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1 – 10 of over 3000
Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2004

Donna L. Leonetti, Dilip C. Nath, Natabar S. Hemam and Dawn B. Neill

Among the Khasi, a matrilineal society in N. E. India, women have direct control over resources and help from matrilineal kin. Given this context, we question what effects…

Abstract

Among the Khasi, a matrilineal society in N. E. India, women have direct control over resources and help from matrilineal kin. Given this context, we question what effects husbands might have on women’s reproductive success. Multivariate analyses of husband contributions on number of live-born children, child survival, and growth of children find positive effects. These effects pertain particularly if the husband is reported to be head of household, otherwise husband effects can be negative. The analysis is framed in terms of facultative reproductive strategies as husbands’ contributions are viewed as responses to variation in women’s resources and condition.

Details

Socioeconomic Aspects of Human Behavioral Ecology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-255-9

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Jyoti Trehan

The independence of India from the British Empire was marked by its partition into two countries, viz India and Pakistan. As a corollary to independence and partition of…

Abstract

The independence of India from the British Empire was marked by its partition into two countries, viz India and Pakistan. As a corollary to independence and partition of India, 500‐odd princely states which had direct relationship with the British Empire were required to integrate with either India or Pakistan — the successor states. The process of integration of princely states was not without its highs and lows. Some of the princely states, like Hyderabad, Junagarh and Jammu and Kashmir, posed quite a few problems at the time of integration for several reasons, namely the inclination of its rulers, the religious component of the local population and the competing interests of the two successor states, India and Pakistan. Hyderabad and Junagarh were favourably resolved in India's favour. Integration of Jammu and Kashmir with India was not a smooth affair. It was only after Pakistan‐aided forces including the Pakistan army had invaded Jammu and Kashmir that the then ruler of Jammu and Kashmir signed the instrument of accession in India's favour. With the instrument of accession, India had a locus standi to protect its territory in Jammu and Kashmir by military means. The salvage operation of throwing the Pakistan‐aided forces and Pakistan military out of Jammu and Kashmir could not be accomplished fully, because India agreed that the United Nations, to which the Kashmir dispute was to be referred, would help in the resolution of the Kashmir issue within the accepted legal framework which was in India's favour. However, India's experience with the United Nations was a great disappointment. In fact India had put so much faith in the United Nations that it even agreed to a plebiscite in Kashmir for resolving the dispute, subject to the condition that Pakistan vacated the illegally occupied areas of Jammu and Kashmir. India need not have agreed to a plebiscite in Jammu and Kashmir, but it did so because of its abiding faith in democratic principles, notwithstanding the legal framework on the basis of which the integration of other princely states with the successor states was carried out. To date, Pakistan has not vacated what is today called ‘Pakistan‐occupied Kashmir’. On top of that, in 1962 China gobbled up a large part of Kashmir in the north‐east, on the basis of a boundary dispute which it raised with India and which has yet to be resolved. To make matters still worse and more complicated, Pakistan ceded a part of Pakistan‐occupied territory to China. Thus the situation, as of today, is that 45.7 per cent of the 222,336 sq. km area of Jammu and Kashmir is with India, 35.1 per cent is with Pakistan and 19.2 per cent is with China. Apart from a war with China, two more full‐scale wars have been fought with Pakistan over Kashmir; the 1965 war, which was confined to the western theatre, and the 1971 war. The 1965 war was a short one and through the Soviet Union's mediation, an agreement was arrived at which was to no one's advantage and more or less restored the status quo ante. Following the 1971 war with Pakistan, India was in an advantageous position, because East Pakistan had ceded from West Pakistan and emerged as an independent country, the two‐nation theory to which Pakistan subscribed as the basis for partition of India into two successor states of India and Pakistan had been exploded; India had 90,000 Pakistan prisoners of war and it had also made large gains on the western front by occupying certain strategic positions. It was from this position of strength in 1971 that India decided that the Kashmir dispute had to be resolved bilaterally by India and Pakistan without any foreign intervention; a doctrine to which Pakistan subscribed at that point of time. In fact, India approached the bilateral talks between the two countries in a spirit of magnanimity. As a first step, India decided to return to Pakistan 90,000 prisoners of war. It agreed to a fresh demarcation of the Line of Control (including withdrawal from several strategic positions) on the unwritten understanding that this Line of Control, over a period of time, based on good neighbourly relations with Pakistan — supplemented by economic ties — would ultimately result in its becoming a de jure border from a de facto border with Pakistan; though the officially stated position continues to be that the whole of Jammu and Kashmir is an integral part of India. The 1971 agreement with Pakistan, which is also called the ‘Shimla Agreement’, thus constitutes the principal plank for the settlement of the Kashmir issue with Pakistan on a bilateral basis.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Krishnamurthy Sriramesh

Developing countries are fast becoming the emerging markets in a ‘global village’. Yet few systematic analyses exist about public relations in developing nations. This…

3150

Abstract

Developing countries are fast becoming the emerging markets in a ‘global village’. Yet few systematic analyses exist about public relations in developing nations. This study uses Grunig's models of public relations to explore the nature of public relations in a sample of four types of organisations in India. Data were collected from 18 organisations and 40 public relations professionals using the survey method and ethnographic analysis. Whereas the self‐reported questionnaires revealed that respondents engaged in two‐way symmetrical communication, the ethnographic data suggested that the press agentry/publicity model was predominantly used by all the organisations. In addition, a new model, the personal influence model, was found to be most popular in the sample organisations.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2019

Hirak Jyoti Hazarika and S. Ravikumar

The purpose of this paper is to explain how the author had carried out the implementation of the radio-frequency identification (RFID) system at Central Library…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain how the author had carried out the implementation of the radio-frequency identification (RFID) system at Central Library, Fakiragram College and to explain to the library professional on how to integrate RFID with Koha integrated library management system (ILMS) in their respective library without taking IT/technical experts assistance. This paper will encourage library professionals to implement RFID technology for the library security and embrace open source software in their institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the author’s practical experiences regarding implementation of the RFID system and integration of middleware RFID software with library management software.

Findings

From the present study, it was found that the library staff are having a positive attitude toward embracing RFID technology in their library. The present implementation of RFID technology in the studies area gives a clear picture about integrating a third-party software/tool like RFID to the existing systems and how the new system has helped the library to provide better service to their users

Research limitations/implications

There were some teething problems at the start between the Koha ILMS SIP2 software and the RFID system. The main issue faced while integration was with setting up the hostname, integrating the instance (i.e. database) and with setting up the port.

Practical implications

This paper will help librarians to implement RFID technology in a practical way to their libraries. The author implemented Koha ILMS with RFID system at the Central Library, Fakiragram College within 1 month and the author migrated data from common communication format (CCF) format to MARC 21 formats. CCF is basically used in SOUL 2.0 developed by INFLIBNET.

Originality/value

This study discusses issues and possible solutions in the process of implementing RFID applications for two innovative applications in library services. This will influence library professionals to learn Koha ILMS and RFID technology implement it in their libraries.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 1954

THE winter months ahead promise to be as active in libraries as those of any recent winter. For students this and next month see the L.A. examinations and, as we write…

Abstract

THE winter months ahead promise to be as active in libraries as those of any recent winter. For students this and next month see the L.A. examinations and, as we write, more schools, whole‐time and part‐time, are engaged as seldom before. There are more meetings, too, and we have been encouraged by the effort in London to provide the fullest possible information of their times and places. Public librarians know that quite noticeable progress is being made with new library buildings, even if, as yet, few on a major scale have been sanctioned ; and there have been signs that non‐public libraries are developing. Those who believe in librarianship will have noticed that a Government Library advertising for a F.L.A. or an A.L.A., includes this, “Candidates must have had considerable experience (preferably technical) of library work.” Some may have glowed to discover that two thousand of us— “professionals and specialists”—have been thought to be worthy of a place in the new Who's who in librarianship. One more point, the new and pleasant library at Chaucer House will be open to us. There can be few more pleasant plans for a Studious off‐day than to spend it in this, with an interval lunch in the Members' Room where we are bound to meet other librarians. Why not try it?

Details

New Library World, vol. 56 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

M. DHANASEKAR

Deployment of optimal size of resources is a key issue in repetitive construction projects. This paper describes a simulation model based on queuing theory for the…

Abstract

Deployment of optimal size of resources is a key issue in repetitive construction projects. This paper describes a simulation model based on queuing theory for the resource scheduling of a real repetitive housing project involving 320 dwelling units constructed in East Delhi, India. The optimal size of resources, defined as the minimum size required to keep the project duration a minimum, has been identified from the results of a series of sensitivity analyses in which the size of the resources was varied one at a time. The duration of the project, the period of utilization of the resources, and the queue length of activities waiting for service are also reported in this paper. It has been shown that reduction in size of resources is achievable without increasing the duration of the project and queue length of activities. Increase in the size of some specialised crews is also proved advantageous.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1943

THE beginning of a new volume is necessarily a time for reflection. Our journal is now forty‐four years old and has appeared without intermission, always with the purpose…

Abstract

THE beginning of a new volume is necessarily a time for reflection. Our journal is now forty‐four years old and has appeared without intermission, always with the purpose, enunciated by its founder, James Duff Brown—to furnish librarians of all kinds and ages with a thought‐exchange and a medium of expression independent of any other control than the editor's conviction that what was published was sincere in intention and likely to be of use to the profession. This does not mean, as our pages to‐day witness, that matters of controversy or even of severe criticism of those who lead the profession officially are excluded. On the contrary, we believe that the best spur to advance is a critical vigilance. Thus it has occurred occasionally that our writers have been at variance with some current policy of the Library Association, some phases of its examinations or its conference policy. Occasionally, too, there have been criticisms of library authorities which an official journal might hesitate to make because those authorities may be in membership of the Library Association. Such criticism was never more necessary than now. The library movement has to be kept alive under the greatest strain in history; indeed, it should progress.

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New Library World, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2004

Abstract

Details

Socioeconomic Aspects of Human Behavioral Ecology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-255-9

Article
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Gopikrishnan S. and Virendra Kumar Paul

The purpose of this paper is to identify and validate user requirement related building performance attributes and sub attributes for performance evaluation of government…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and validate user requirement related building performance attributes and sub attributes for performance evaluation of government residential buildings.

Design/methodology/approach

User requirements in a building were listed from ISO 6241-1984 (E). Seven building performance attributes were identified through literature review and linked with the user requirements. Three more attributes not directly related to building performance but that could influence user satisfaction were also identified. The attributes were grouped into physical, environmental and external factors to suit the intervention strategies proposed to be implemented by maintenance agencies to enhance user satisfaction. The need for amplifying the attributes for better comprehension by occupants was felt; hence, characteristics of each of these attributes were listed based on literature survey and review. In total, 42 such sub attributes were identified to amplify ten attributes. To validate the adequacy of these attributes, an online survey was launched to garner feedback on first adequacy of the attributes and secondly to confirm whether there is a necessity for amplification of attributes for better comprehension by occupants. In total, 200 responses were received through the online survey, and the data received were categorized as per gender, location, sector, profession and finally civilian/military.

Findings

The outcome of the survey revealed that 84% of the participants felt that the attributes were adequate enough to assess building performance and 75% of them agreed that amplification of attributes through sub attributes as essential for better comprehension and to avoid ambiguity in response. Also the seven identified attributes were ranked from 1 to 7 with 1 being the most important. Weights of each attribute in the scale of 1 were also arrived at based on the responses. Similar exercise was carried out for all sub attributes.

Research limitations/implications

Present research is confined to government residential buildings that are constructed and maintained through public funds and hence individual occupants are not constrained by economics. Other type of building infrastructure used for training, sports, storage, medical, etc., will have certain more specific performance parameters in addition to the ones identified in this paper for residential buildings. Economics also become a factor from users' perspective in case of private residential buildings which does not form part of the scope of this paper. However, as a future scope, the number of attributes can be escalated depending upon the type of building being surveyed, keeping the identified attributes as core attributes.

Practical implications

This paper links the end user satisfaction with building performance and the outcome of surveys will provide useful insights to the behaviour of buildings as well the efficiency and effectiveness of the existing maintenance management systems. Survey based on these attributes and sub attributes will enable the facility managers to ascertain the satisfaction level of occupants with respect to building performance, satisfaction with respect to external factors such as accessibility, amenities and societal issues other than building performance. It will enable the facility managers and decision makers to prioritize their maintenance according to importance, availability of funds, etc. It will also provide a data bank over the years that can indicate the changing aspirations of occupants of government residential buildings. This will enable policymakers to review specifications, authorizations and scales.

Originality/value

This paper links user requirement with building performance. ISO 6241-1984(E) forms the basis for user requirement. Survey based on these user requirement related building performance attributes shall enable facility managers prioritize their maintenance efforts in management of facilities.

Details

Facilities, vol. 36 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 3000