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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2022

Myriam Ertz, Émilie Boily, Shouheng Sun and Emine Sarigöllü

The purpose of this study is to examine the process underlying how consumers shift roles from users to suppliers of goods or services in the collaborative economy (CE). It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the process underlying how consumers shift roles from users to suppliers of goods or services in the collaborative economy (CE). It examines quantatively the impact of a series of explanatory variables underlying that switchover process.

Design/methodology/approach

This study identifies and tests the key factors that motivate the user-provider transition by introducing the spillover effect from the proenvironmental literature into collaborative practices and using four experimental designs. Considering behavioral characteristics, context, intrinsic variables and socialization, this study provides an in-depth understanding of the process of transition from user to supplier in the CE.

Findings

The results suggest the interactive nature of the spillover as peer influence boosts changes in individual motivations, preferences and behaviors. Furthermore, promoting solidarity between members of the CE platform facilitates the transition of participants from users to providers. In addition, the users’ perception of socialization, satisfaction and sense of indebtedness may also play a significant role in the transition.

Research limitations/implications

The study highlights the process underlying the switchover from user to provider at the prosumer level. More specifically, this study identifies key variables influencing the intention to switchover in the CE by drawing on the spillover effect from pro-environmental behavior and considering the spillover as an interactive process.

Practical implications

Managers who wish to develop collaborative systems must attract a critical mass of providers to ensure the viability of their systems. Instead of recruiting new providers, managers may convert existing users into providers. This study identifies the key variables to modulate to this end.

Originality/value

The findings offer important managerial implications and shed new light on the CE literature.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 56 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 January 2021

Shian-Yang Tzeng, Myriam Ertz, Myung-Soo Jo and Emine Sarigöllü

Singles' Day (SD) in China is the world's biggest online shopping event while consumer dissatisfaction is also on the rise. Both theory and practice need sharper insights to…

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Abstract

Purpose

Singles' Day (SD) in China is the world's biggest online shopping event while consumer dissatisfaction is also on the rise. Both theory and practice need sharper insights to foster consumer satisfaction, but such knowledge remains sparse in the literature. The current study addresses this void by assessing the effects of online and offline retail service features on consumer satisfaction with SD.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-phase survey was implemented before and after the SD online shopping holiday, with 594 participants in China. Respondents were randomly selected from unique proprietary databases of merchants in the top-five online product categories in China.

Findings

The findings show that information quality, product quality and savings improve, but product return worsens, customer satisfaction with the online shopping holiday. However, good after-sale service can ease the product return process thereby boosting customer satisfaction.

Originality/value

This paper addresses a research void by studying effectiveness of retail service features on consumer satisfaction with online shopping festivals.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 39 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2019

Myriam Ertz, Fahri Karakas, Frederick Stapenhurst, Rasheed Draman, Emine Sarigöllü and Myung-Soo Jo

This study aims to offer a better understanding of supply side of bribery and corruption in an international business perspective by conceptualizing it in the narrower concept of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to offer a better understanding of supply side of bribery and corruption in an international business perspective by conceptualizing it in the narrower concept of misconduct in business (MIB) derived from the deontological perspective to business ethics.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a case study methodology of professionals working within Canadian mining multinational corporations operating in Africa. The authors conducted 2 focus groups, 25 in-depth interviews, document search and an open-ended questionnaire to 15 professionals. Further, they drew on a combination of the classic relationalist sociological framework and its recent revision, that they named the relationalism-substantialism framework to analyze the data.

Findings

The triangulated empirical data show that the reason why MIB in the form of bribery supply occurs is not exclusively tied to any given perspective, whether the individual, the organization or the wider societal context. Rather, these different layers are tightly intertwined and interact with each other for the supply of bribery to occur.

Originality/value

Although the three siloed perspectives of MIB have been studied in the literature, they have not been addressed in relation to one another, and even less with a relationalism-substantialism framework. Yet, this perspective contributes compellingly to the understanding of the supply side in bribery. The authors propose a net of conceptually related constructs that intervene in the process of bribery supply occurrence, namely relationality influenced by institutional dysfunctionality and conflation and substantiality through agency and culture.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Myriam Ertz, Fabien Durif, Agnès Lecompte and Caroline Boivin

The purpose of this study is to investigate the extent to which collaborative consumption (CC) enthusiasts are significantly more likely to engage into specific forms of socially…

1892

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the extent to which collaborative consumption (CC) enthusiasts are significantly more likely to engage into specific forms of socially responsible consumption (SRC), in contrast to regular consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors administered an online questionnaire survey to a panel of 1,006 consumers. A cluster analysis combined with analyses of variance then determined the extent to which CC enthusiasts were more likely to engage in the focal SRC behaviors as opposed to others.

Findings

CC enthusiasts differ positively from other consumers concerning sustainable transportation, citizen consumption and composting but negatively from other consumers concerning recycling; they do not differ significantly with regard to environmental, animal protection and local consumption.

Originality/value

Conflating CC and SRC remains debatable. This study provides some preliminary evidence about the complex associations that exists between the two constructs.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2023

Myriam Ertz, Shashi Kashav, Tian Zeng and Shouheng Sun

Traditionally, life cycle assessment (LCA) has focused on environmental aspects, but integrating social aspects in LCA has gained traction among scholars and practitioners. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Traditionally, life cycle assessment (LCA) has focused on environmental aspects, but integrating social aspects in LCA has gained traction among scholars and practitioners. This study aims to review key social life cycle assessment (SLCA) themes, namely, drivers and barriers of SLCA implementation, methodology and measurement metrics, classification of initiatives to improve SLCA and customer perspectives in SLCA.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 148 scientific papers extracted from the Web of Science database were used and analyzed using bibliometric and content analysis.

Findings

The findings suggest that the existing research ignores several aspects of SCLA, which impedes positive growth in topical scholarship, and the study proposes a classification of SLCA research paths to enrich future research. This study contributes positively to SLCA by further developing this area, and as such, this research is a primer to gain deeper knowledge about the state-of-the-art in SLCA as well as to foresee its future scope and challenges.

Originality/value

The study provides an up-to-date review of extant research pertaining to SLCA.

Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Francine Rodier, Fabien Durif and Myriam Ertz

Previous research has extensively examined “food deserts,” where access to healthy food is limited. However, little is known of the buying behavior at the individual household…

1561

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has extensively examined “food deserts,” where access to healthy food is limited. However, little is known of the buying behavior at the individual household level in terms of buying habits and consumption in these areas. The purpose of this paper is to determine to what extent other factors than access can account for the purchase of healthy food products, namely, fruits and vegetables.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper proposes to partially fill this gap through a qualitative (n=55) and quantitative (n=512) study of those people who are in charge of their household purchases in two food deserts in the city of Montreal.

Findings

Results show that geographical access to supermarkets is not the main factor fostering the purchase of healthy foods (fruits and vegetables). Indeed, food education (e.g. information, simple recipes, cooking classes), associated with a changing mediation process through product diversification (e.g. availability of local products in bulk) and supply (e.g. farmers) seems to be more significant.

Research limitations/implications

Future studies could compare the results obtained through this study in different socio-demographic contexts. Longitudinal analyses could also increase the understanding of the social and commercial challenges.

Originality/value

In contrast to previous studies, the results show that geographical access to supermarkets is not the main factor fostering the purchase of fruits and vegetables. Indeed, food education (e.g. information, simple recipes, cooking classes), associated with a changing mediation process through product diversification (e.g. products in bulk) and supply (e.g. farmers) seem to be more significant.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 April 2022

Muhammad Yaseen Bhutto, Myriam Ertz, Yasir Ali Soomro, Mussadiq Ali Ali Khan and Waheed Ali

The purpose of this study is to develop an extended theory of planned behavior (TPB) model by adding religious commitment (RC) and self-efficacy as internal variables and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop an extended theory of planned behavior (TPB) model by adding religious commitment (RC) and self-efficacy as internal variables and investigating the effect of these variables on attitudes toward halal cosmetics. In addition, this study also examined the moderating role of halal literacy in the relationships between attitudes (ATT), subjective norms (SN), perceived behavioral control (PBC) and intentions to purchase halal cosmetics.

Design/methodology/approach

The method of data collection used was self-administered surveys with customers in two stores in Karachi, Pakistan, yielding 267 valid questionnaires. To guarantee validity and reliability, convergent and discriminant validity analyses were conducted, and structural equation modeling was advanced to assess the relationships between variables using smart partial least squares 3.0 software. The interaction moderation technique has been used to examine the moderating effect of halal literacy on the purchase intention (PI) of halal cosmetics.

Findings

The results show that RC and self-efficacy both significantly impact the attitudes of Gen Y. Normative beliefs also had a significant relationship with SN. Further, ATT and SN had a significant relationship with PI of halal cosmetics, while PBC was nonsignificant. Furthermore, halal literacy is found to have a positive moderating influence on ATT and PI, and SN and PI. Finally, the moderating effect of halal literacy does not exist in the relationship between PBC and PI.

Research limitations/implications

Participants’ characteristics should vary for future studies, and larger sample sizes may yield different results. It is critical for managers working in the cosmetic industry to monitor Muslim consumption patterns to develop strategies to reach Muslim consumers. This study reveals the effect of RC, self-efficacy and the moderating role of halal literacy on the behavioral attitudes of a booming market sector, which can guide marketing managers in developing more effective advertising campaigns.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the halal consumption literature by exploring RC and self-efficacy as constructs for the very first time in the TPB model. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to explore the influence of halal literacy on Gen Y Pakistani Muslim consumer behavioral intention toward halal cosmetic products using the TPB model. The paper offers an extended TPB model framework that may be of interest to scholars, marketers and policymakers.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2017

Myriam Ertz, Fabien Durif and Manon Arcand

Marketing scholars have devoted little attention to the study of practices which grant multiple lives to goods. However, these practices can considerably extend products…

1045

Abstract

Purpose

Marketing scholars have devoted little attention to the study of practices which grant multiple lives to goods. However, these practices can considerably extend products lifecycles with far-reaching implications for traditional retailers and the economy. Accordingly, this paper aims to provide scales for perceived impact and motivations of goods multiple lives practices and to investigate the influence of impacts on motivations.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative phase (three discussion groups and 15 in-depth interviews) identified consumers’ motivations and perceived impacts of goods multiple lives practices. Two online surveys were then conducted on online panels, involving more than 2,200 consumers, to develop the measurement scales and test the structural model.

Findings

Results show that impacts measured only marginally influence economic motives but account significantly for a broad range of other motivations (ecological, protester and social contact motives).

Research limitations/implications

The study design is cross-sectional, therefore lacking causality. Replication studies could cross-validate the findings by means of experimental research.

Practical implications

The findings may prove of specific interest to marketers and organizations in the goods multiple lives sector seeking to harness consumer interest in these types of practices for reasons above and beyond lone economic incentives.

Originality/value

This study is innovative in two regards: it explores a relatively under-theorized field in marketing, namely, goods multiple lives practices; and it proposes a challenging theoretical perspective which supposes that consumers’ perceived impact of their practices plays a significant role in motivating them to engage in practices of the like.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 February 2018

Yongbing Jiao, Myriam Ertz, Myung-Soo Jo and Emine Sarigollu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of culture, personality, and motivation on social and content value, which in turn affect brand equity in social media…

5212

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of culture, personality, and motivation on social and content value, which in turn affect brand equity in social media brand community (SMBC) setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Online surveys were conducted with 595 SMBC participants in China and the USA. AMOS is used in SEM analysis.

Findings

Consumers with collectivistic, extroverted, and extrinsic orientation experience social value through social media participation. In contrast, consumers with individualistic and intrinsic orientation demonstrate content value. Furthermore, Chinese consumers show more social value and the US consumers more content value. Accordingly, the effect of social value (content value) on brand equity is stronger for Chinese (US) consumers.

Research limitations/implications

Culture was assessed only by individualism/collectivism, personality by extroversion/introversion and motivation by extrinsic/intrinsic. Future research should verify external generalizability beyond China and the USA.

Practical implications

Enhanced social and content value through consumers’ social media participation can increase brand equity. Thus, companies should motivate consumers to experience more value via social media participation, and, cultivate a multicultural climate and facilitate the exchange of culture.

Originality/value

First, this research redefines customer value into two components: social and content value. Second, this paper is the first to investigate the antecedents (i.e. culture, personality, and motivation) and the consequence (i.e. brand equity) of customer value in social media community settings. Third, this study illustrates differences in social media customer value experiences of Chinese vs US consumers.

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2018

Damien Hallegatte, Myriam Ertz and François Marticotte

Retro branding is gaining unprecedented momentum. This study aims to empirically examine the moderating impact of nostalgia proneness on the relationship between retro branding…

1541

Abstract

Purpose

Retro branding is gaining unprecedented momentum. This study aims to empirically examine the moderating impact of nostalgia proneness on the relationship between retro branding and consumer behavioral intentions in the music industry. Nostalgia and retro branding are two paramount elements conceptually discussed in literature but rarely investigated together empirically despite their interconnections.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment including four different scenarios blending retro and contemporary stimuli was conducted on 181 subjects. Two rock band variables were manipulated: song set list (i.e. list of songs) and band lineup.

Findings

The findings suggest that mixing the past and present for a retro brand impacts consumer behavior. A more nuanced explanation is suggested by showing that a retro brand has a strong effect on consumers’ intentions to attend and willingness to pay, but not on their WOM intentions, when these consumers are more prone to feeling nostalgia.

Originality/value

Nostalgia and retro branding appear to be interconnected concepts, but few studies have assessed how nostalgia proneness can impact consumers’ intentions toward a retro brand. Fewer have investigated consumers’ intentions toward an experiential, intangible retro brand.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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