Search results

1 – 2 of 2
Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Gayle C. Avery

This interview discusses a “Blue Ocean” strategy initiative: how to introduce effective change in diabetes care into Thailand given a strong reluctance in patients, and in…

Abstract

Purpose

This interview discusses a “Blue Ocean” strategy initiative: how to introduce effective change in diabetes care into Thailand given a strong reluctance in patients, and in Thai society, to see that diabetes is not a condition to be treated by doctors alone.

Design/methodology/approach

An interview with Dr Thep Himathongkam, the pioneer of holistic diabetes care in Thailand.

Findings

One strategic management problem he faced was the lack of suitably trained staff. Thailand had no university courses producing the multidisciplinary personnel needed for diabetes treatment such as diabetes educators, dieticians, or foot care specialists. He address the multidisciplinary personnel shortage by training the missing specialists, getting universities on board and more recently securing funding from the World Diabetes Foundation.

Practical implications

The result of the diabetic foot-care training for more than 2,500 personnel, mostly from community hospitals, has been markedly successful, with a reduction in annual amputations in Thailand of 80 per cent over five years.

Originality/value

This interview offers a look at the multi-track problem solving required to successfully implement a Blue Ocean strategy.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Judith Madill, Libbie Wallace, Karine Goneau-Lessard, Robb Stuart MacDonald and Celine Dion

– The purpose of this paper is to identify, summarize and assess literature focused on developing social marketing programs for Aboriginal people.

1398

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify, summarize and assess literature focused on developing social marketing programs for Aboriginal people.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a literature search and review of research papers concerning social marketing and Aboriginal populations over the period 2003-2013.

Findings

The research reveals very little published research (N = 16). The literature points to a wide range of findings including the importance of segmenting/targeting and avoiding pan-Aboriginal campaigns; cultural importance of family and community; the importance of multi-channels; universal value of mainstream and Aboriginal media outlets, use of print media, value of elders and story-telling for message dissemination; increasingly important role of Internet-based technology; need for campaign development to reflect Aboriginal culture; and importance of formative research to inform campaign development.

Social implications

Considerable research is warranted to better develop more effective social marketing campaigns targeted to Aboriginal audiences to improve health outcomes for such groups across the globe.

Originality/value

This paper provides a baseline foundation upon which future social marketing research can be built. It also acts as a call to action for future research and theory in this important field.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

1 – 2 of 2