Search results

1 – 10 of over 3000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

M.M. Metwally

Introduction Although there is no Muslim country, at present, which can be called an Islamic economy, in the sense of following, in a strict fashion, the teachings of the…

Abstract

Introduction Although there is no Muslim country, at present, which can be called an Islamic economy, in the sense of following, in a strict fashion, the teachings of the Qur'an, the traditions of Prophet Muhammad and the practices of early Muslims, a majority of Muslim consumers would seem to hold to Islamic values and views regarding the disposal of their incomes. The aim of this paper is to throw some light on the effect of this behaviour on optimal consumption of a Muslim individual. The paper is divided into three sections. Section one briefly summarises the economic behaviour of a non‐religious (rational) consumer. Section two discusses the utility function of a Muslim consumer and highlights the differences between this function and that of a non‐Muslim consumer. Section three determines the conditions of optimum consumption of a Muslim consumer.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Ili‐Salsabila Abd‐Razak and Asmat‐Nizam Abdul‐Talib

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the globality and intentionality aspects of consumer boycotts among the Muslim dominant markets around the world through the…

Downloads
922

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the globality and intentionality aspects of consumer boycotts among the Muslim dominant markets around the world through the consumer animosity perspective, to provide better understanding of the issues. Some applied and potential solutions for marketers and policy makers in dealing with the issues are also discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

The analytical definition of consumer boycotts through the consumer animosity perspective is proposed and the relevance of the discussion is considered. The relationships between the globality and intentionality attributions with animosity and consumer boycotts are assessed before strategies to deal with the issues are diagnosed. Seminal works of classic and current consumer boycotts and animosity literature are reviewed in developing the conceptual background of the paper. Further conceptual reflections are stated based on the depicted current events in the market around the world.

Findings

The conceptual discussion revealed that consumer boycotts in the Muslim dominant market and animosity are two related issues worthy being explored. The issues are of the global concern and occurred unintentionally, therefore they could stimulate unexpected outcomes for the marketers and policy makers alike. Nonetheless, several strategies in dealing with the issues are found to be effective in preventing the issues from getting worse. However, the strategies would not work for all entities in all situations. Understanding the root of the issues would be the best solution.

Research limitations/implications

The discussion is limited to conceptual background of the aspects discussed. Further empirical studies would enhance the applicability of the discussions presented.

Practical implications

In order to find strategies to deal with consumer boycotts in the Muslim dominant markets, marketers need to understand the real reason for the events to occur and demonstrate sincere understanding towards the issues. By doing so, consumer boycotts would not obstruct the progress and growth of the international business in general. Looking at the issues from the animosity perspective is a prolific attempt to understand the events.

Originality/value

The paper reveals the relationship between consumer boycotts and animosity in the Muslim dominant markets and offers understanding of the specific events occurrence. The discussion is extended to describe the events' globality and intentionality attribution assessment.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 November 2020

Dg Ku Zunaidah Ag Majid, Suhaila Abdul Hanan and Hazlinda Hassan

The halal industry has been growing in recent years, seeing an increasing demand for halal products from both Muslim and non-Muslim consumers and acknowledging that halal…

Abstract

Purpose

The halal industry has been growing in recent years, seeing an increasing demand for halal products from both Muslim and non-Muslim consumers and acknowledging that halal is a universal concept accepted by both Muslim and non-Muslim societies. Service-related providers, such as logistics, could influence the demand for halal products by consumers. This paper aims to investigate the factors that influence consumers' willingness to pay (WTP) for halal logistics among young non-Muslim adults.

Design/methodology/approach

A set of survey questions were distributed to young non-Muslim adults and 280 questionnaires were analysed.

Findings

The results indicate that three independent variables had a direct relationship and significant influence on the WTP for halal logistics among non-Muslim consumers. These variables are concern on halal, knowledge about halal and perception of halal logistics. Meanwhile, the awareness of halal logistics significantly influenced the consumers' WTP for halal logistics, provided that it was mediated by the perception of halal logistics.

Originality/value

Given the gap in research on halal logistics and WTP, this paper presents a consolidated examination of this subject, particularly the WTP of young non-Muslim adults. Furthermore, by including the perception of halal logistics as a mediator, this study leverages the halal logistics knowledge to a new level, thus deepening the understanding of this topic and contributing additional knowledge. This study also presents some opportunities for future empirical research.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Reham I. Elseidi

This study aims to explore the perceptions of Arabian Muslim consumers about halal food products and to investigate their behaviour towards halal-labelled food products in…

Downloads
2174

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the perceptions of Arabian Muslim consumers about halal food products and to investigate their behaviour towards halal-labelled food products in UK mainstream supermarkets using the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). The role of Islamic religiosity and consumers’ confidence regarding the halal logo as moderating factors is investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional data were collected through distributed 400 questionnaires in Scotland, mainly to Muslim consumers who come from different Arabian countries and are currently living in Scotland.

Findings

The results show that the TPB is a valid model for predicting Muslim consumers’ intention to purchase halal-labelled food products. The findings reveal that for consumers with high and low Islamic religiosity, subjective norms are the most influential determinants of their intention to purchase halal-labelled food products.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the focus on only Arabian Muslim consumers within an ethnic minority population living in Scotland, and the use of convenience and snowball sampling.

Practical implications

The findings could be useful for halal industry food makers to better serve their customers through sophisticated marketing strategies.

Originality/value

This study extends understanding of consumershalal-labelled food purchasing behaviour using TPB to determining the rationales for purchasing halal foods from mainstream UK supermarkets. Unlike others studies, this study used Islamic religiosity instead of self-identity (being a Muslim) as a moderating factor.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Norazah Mohd Suki

This study aims to distinguish between Muslim and non-Muslim consumers regarding celebrity influence on brands and purchase intention, and assess the relative importance…

Downloads
3938

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to distinguish between Muslim and non-Muslim consumers regarding celebrity influence on brands and purchase intention, and assess the relative importance of celebrity credibility, in terms of physical attractiveness, trustworthiness, expertise and product–brand congruency. The study also researches attitudes towards brands, and purchase intention and their ability to predict consumers’ religion.

Design/methodology/approach

The research aim was achieved through an empirical study involving a self-administered questionnaire distributed to members of the public recruited from the Federal Territory of Labuan, Malaysia. Data were collected from 250 Muslim and non-Muslim consumers using a convenience sampling method. Their participation was purely voluntary. Multiple discriminant analysis via Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) computer program version 20 was used to answer the research questions.

Findings

Empirical results of the multiple discriminant analysis indicated that celebrity expertise and attitudes towards brands strongly predict allocation to Muslim consumers rather than non-Muslim consumers. The relative importance of the celebrity credibility aspects from Muslim consumers’ perspectives was: celebrity expertise, celebrity attitudes towards brands, purchase intention, product–brand congruency and physical attractiveness. Muslim consumers are found to choose expertise but not trustworthiness. Muslim consumers’ faith or trust may be linked to the perception that products and services endorsed by the celebrities are in line with Shariah principles which are consistent with Islamic principles.

Research limitations/implications

Respondents were randomly drawn from the Muslim and non-Muslim population of the Federal Territory of Labuan, Malaysia. Consequently, they may not represent the entire population of Malaysia. Future researchers could overcome the limits of generalizability by increasing sample coverage.

Originality/value

The paper empirically justified the discriminating function among celebrity credibility elements in terms of physical attractiveness, trustworthiness, expertise, and product–brand congruency of Muslim and non-Muslim consumer attitudes towards brands and purchase intention. Thus, the results of this study offer a new forward motion to the findings of prior studies on consumer perception of celebrity credibility, which is not much covered in the literature in the Malaysian context between Muslim and non-Muslim consumer perspectives. The findings are able to add literature on Muslim consumer behaviour in the use of celebrities, as these celebrities could act as inspirational to the consumers.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Jessen Floren, Tareq Rasul and Azmat Gani

The purpose of this study is to systematically review the existing literature on Islamic marketing and its major impacts on consumer behaviours. In addition, this study…

Downloads
1141

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to systematically review the existing literature on Islamic marketing and its major impacts on consumer behaviours. In addition, this study seeks to shed light on global trends and dynamics beyond Islamic marketing and how Islam, as one of the most prominent religions worldwide, affects the consumption and purchasing choices of Muslim consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review of published peer-reviewed articles on Islamic marketing was conducted. A comprehensive search strategy was applied on different databases, including Google Scholar, JSTOR, ScienceDirect, MUSE and Directory of Open Access Journals, and the retrieved articles were then selected from 14 leading journals published between 2010 and 2018.

Findings

Islam as a religion has been found to impact the ethical beliefs and behaviours of Muslim consumers from different countries, as well as consumers’ choice of services and some taboo products on the basis of Islamic Shariah law. The results show that Islamic marketing has a significant impact on the characteristics of Muslim consumers and therefore affects their key choices about certain products and services.

Research limitations/implications

The studies included in this review are extensively based on peer-reviewed articles published in high-ranked marketing journals (A* and A in the Australian Business Deans Council list), which may be perceived as a limitation in the present study. Another limitation is that this study only took into account peer-reviewed articles written in English.

Practical implications

The important relationship between Islam and the heterogeneous Muslim consumer will have a considerable practical implication for companies that explore the marketing supply capacity in the Islamic world. The authors hereby expect the current review to significantly impact the identification of methodologies for the main trends in the academic analysis of Islamic marketing and Islamic consumer behaviour.

Originality/value

This review provides a strong contribution to Islamic marketing literature by recommending the need to integrate the Islamic practices related to consumer consumption of goods and services in studies focused on consumer behaviour analysis.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Norazah Mohd Suki and Norbayah Mohd Suki

– This paper aims to examine whether Muslim and non-Muslim consumers give different importance to green food consumption.

Downloads
3528

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine whether Muslim and non-Muslim consumers give different importance to green food consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were analysed using means comparison and multiple discriminant analysis across a sample of 700 students in a public higher learning institution in the Federal Territory of Labuan, Malaysia, using the convenience sampling technique.

Findings

Empirical results via multiple discriminant analysis discovered that imperative aspects such as specific needs, personal environmental values related to green food and governmental efforts strongly predict discrimination towards green food consumption among the non-Muslim consumers. Muslim consumers follow a strict diet that complies with religious dietary laws.

Practical implications

Understanding Muslim and non-Muslim consumers’ awareness of and intentions towards green food consumption is very important for any manager in the food industry or food market, as it is critical that the food they produce is safe, environmental and healthy. It is understood that Muslim consumers are very particular about food intake, as they can only consume food that complies with religious dietary laws.

Originality/value

The results of this study presented vital insights and enhanced the understanding of the role of religion and its influence on green food consumption in Asia.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Norafni @ Farlina binti Rahim

Islamic finance and Halal product sectors are thriving successfully. This chapter is a general review of the perception of Asian consumers on Islamic finance and Halal…

Abstract

Purpose

Islamic finance and Halal product sectors are thriving successfully. This chapter is a general review of the perception of Asian consumers on Islamic finance and Halal sectors in the global Halal economy.

Methodology/approach

The first section will briefly describe the Halal concept in both Islamic finance and Halal industries, and the growth of both sectors in Asian countries. The second part highlights the review of Asian consumers’ perception towards Islamic finance products and Halal products.

Findings

The review found that the consumers’ perception towards the Islamic finance products and Halal products is distinctive. This is due to the diversity of Asian countries in terms of geography, religion, culture, ethnic, school of thoughts (madzahib), income per capita and government’s involvement.

Originality/value

The third part of the chapter concentrates on planning towards Halal marketing, which involves the move and future challenges in different layers of industries to gear up and strengthen the Halal economy.

Details

Advances in Islamic Finance, Marketing, and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-899-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Mehree Iqbal and Nabila Nisha

This study aims to explore the presumed relationship between religion and purchase behavior of consumers in the context of Bangladesh.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the presumed relationship between religion and purchase behavior of consumers in the context of Bangladesh.

Methodology/approach

This research is divided into two main parts. In the first one, the authors reviewed some of the most important studies relative to religion and marketing and those specifically relative to Islamic marketing. In the second part, this research shows the findings of a structured questionnaire administered to a sample of Muslim consumers currently residing in the capital city of Bangladesh – Dhaka. The questionnaire also sought to find out the respondents’ attitude towards the modern marketing tactics, in terms of the physical and visual appearance of local products, their perception of religious principles in the purchase decision and their attitude towards imported products of non-Muslim countries.

Findings

Results of this study highlight that religion often represents an essential reference point in influencing the perception and purchase behavior of consumers in the context of Bangladesh. This implies that marketing strategies based on Islamic ethics is going to be quite instrumental in order to reach out to the consumers in Muslim countries. As such, there is largely a strong positive relationship between religion and the purchase behavior of Muslim consumers.

Research limitations/implications

The lack of research on Islamic marketing limits the intensity of arguments in this study. For this reason, the literature review is not completely exhaustive. A small sample size has also been used due to time and resource constraints. Future research can be done on a bigger sample size of Bangladesh or other Islamic countries across the world. Other research avenues may include the study of Islamic marketing mix and exploring the factors that can influence non-Muslim consumers to select products and services based on Islamic ethics.

Practical implications

It is very important for businesses to introduce healthy practices in countries like Bangladesh and this can be rightly achieved through the use of Islamic marketing. Furthermore, the use of Islamic ethics in marketing strategies can eventually influence the religious perception of consumers and make them loyal towards any brands, products, and services in the context of Bangladesh.

Originality/value

The chapter draws attention to Bangladesh as one of the potential markets where the concept of Islamic market mechanism can be established. It also highlights the challenges that global marketers can face with Islamic marketing in Muslim countries like Bangladesh. Besides, it is the only study to date that focuses upon the relationship of religion, marketing, and consumer behavior for consumer products of the manufacturing industry.

Details

Advances in Islamic Finance, Marketing, and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-899-8

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 March 2020

Syeda Nazish Zahra Bukhari, Salmi Mohd Isa and Goh Yen Nee

The purpose of this study is to empirically examine the determinants of purchase intention of Halal vaccination and compare the results between Muslim consumers in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to empirically examine the determinants of purchase intention of Halal vaccination and compare the results between Muslim consumers in Malaysia and Pakistan. It focuses on analyzing the influence of various factors on the purchase intention of Halal vaccination and determining whether the relationships are significantly different in the two Muslim-majority countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on the extended theory of planned behavior and self-congruity theory. The variable of religiosity was added with the three variables of the theory of planned behavior, i.e. attitude toward Halal vaccinations, subjective norms and perceived behavioral control. It shows the congruity between Muslim consumer and Islamic brands and proposes a wider range of determinants in the framework. The study’s sample size was 378, and the respondents were Muslim consumers in Malaysia and Pakistan. Purposive sampling technique was used to extract the sample from three cities in each country. Partial least square (PLS) was used to statistically analyze the data using PLS–structural equation modeling approach. The measurement model was analyzed, and invariance of the measurement model was established. Afterward, the hypotheses were tested, and multi-group analysis was performed through Henseler’s multi-group analysis (MGA) and Permutation test.

Findings

The results indicate a lack of significant relationships between the independent variables and the purchase intention of Halal vaccination except in the case of subjective norms. This construct has a significant but inverse relationship in the case of Pakistan’s Muslim consumers, which can be attributed to the presence of consumer skepticism regarding the issue of Halal vaccination. The MGA results reveal a statistically significant difference in the influence of religiosity on purchase intention between the two countries, depicting differences in the brand–self congruity perceptions of consumers in the two countries.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size was relatively small due to the limited time duration.

Originality/value

The area of Halal vaccination has been given limited attention in academic literature. This study addresses this area that has limited research and is greatly attractive to a large number of brands targeting the Muslim consumer market. The results of the study can form a foundation for creating the branding strategy of this product category and assessing its demand in various Muslim markets.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 3000