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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Keith G. Brown

The purpose of this paper is to provide an historical context of the growth of Celtic music on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada and to trace the development as a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an historical context of the growth of Celtic music on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia, Canada and to trace the development as a component of a cultural tourism product.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines literature on music and cultural tourism as well as government reports. Semi‐structured interviews were done with a cross‐section of people, key to the development of musical cultural tourism on Cape Breton Island.

Findings

The paper reports on the initial investments of the federal government of Canada in tourism infrastructure on Cape Breton Island in the 1970s and the initial investments in entertainment as a component of tourism in 1986. The paper examines the growth of Celtic music in Cape Breton and the birth of the success of the Cape Breton sound.

Research limitations/implications

The practitioners of the music industry are quite clear in their views of the importance of their sector to the broader tourism industry. However, the study is quiet on the actual perceptions and views of the tourist. Further research should examine the importance of the cultural experience in contributing to the satisfaction of the visitors' experience.

Practical implications

The success of the Celtic Colors International Festival has clearly indicated the market for Cape Breton Celtic music and that festivals of this sort have the ability to extend the tourism season.

Originality/value

The paper chronicles the development of one of the most successful Atlantic Canadian cultural tourism products which has broad applications in comparable tourist destinations.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Thomas Bustomi and Bhakti Nur Avianto

Bandung city had constructed new facilities in urban areas or supplemented existing facilities to create a city branding of music-design-culinary. This paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

Bandung city had constructed new facilities in urban areas or supplemented existing facilities to create a city branding of music-design-culinary. This paper aims to assess their potential as new tourist areas for urban. This study very little research explicitly to discuss new phenomena tourism from urban areas that raise the image of three branding concepts at once.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative research more emphasized meaning and process analysis. Data analysis was carried out by looking at the status of an urban community, an object and a set of conditions in the thought system or current cases. The supporting data analysis technique used in this research is spatial analysis overlay is one of the basic ways to create spatial relationships between music, design and culinary by processing the result SWOT analysis factor.

Findings

Three forms of brand imaging development can ultimately lift new changes in strengthening relationships for building a good image of the tourism city with visitors.

Originality/value

For developing a new branding that can be implemented, the actors necessary to identify and assess internal and external factors policy for further formulation development of tourism city strategy. These articles very few research to explore discuss new phenomena in urban tourism that raise the image of three branding concepts at once. The present work was a modest effort to fill this gap literature with uses a compilation of research findings separately from city branding in various cities used as a conceptual basis and a comparative analysis is then conducted of three schemes.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Tyler Sonnichsen

This paper discusses how vinyl records become souvenirs of musical tourism. The record-as-souvenir dynamic is particularly relevant in the discussion about punk culture in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper discusses how vinyl records become souvenirs of musical tourism. The record-as-souvenir dynamic is particularly relevant in the discussion about punk culture in cities like Washington, DC, and other scenes which defy encapsulation as touristic landscapes. Arguing a fluid perspective on musical tourism, the purpose of this paper is to present the argument that vinyl functions as de facto souvenirs of underground musical landscapes.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper incorporates literature on souvenirs within tourism studies, market research, and empirical data. It also builds upon research on emotional geographies and the resurgence of the vinyl record industry.

Findings

In many cases, musical recordings (particularly those on vinyl, for tactile and fetishist reasons), while not designed for the function of being souvenirs, come to signify counter-narrative definitions of place.

Research limitations/implications

This work focuses on the context of vinyl as souvenirs with findings derived from the intersection of tourism, critical geography, and music marketing. In offering this contextual account, there is no claim toward generalization but rather the work is put forward as a depth of insight on a phenomenon long in the making yet neglected by researchers. However, a more comprehensive approach to provide further insight on vinyl as souvenirs might include consumer interviews.

Practical implications

This paper expands the conversation about souvenirs further into the era of modern, underground tourism. It argues for the inclusion of music consumption, especially vinyl, as prototypical and unintentional souvenirs as decided by the consumer rather than the producer. It also expands the discourse on counter-narratives of places like Washington, DC, in conversations about place-based music marketing and tourism.

Social implications

This paper frames musical souvenirs in terms of the consumer deciding their value and role in the cultivation of sense of place, rather than the producer. Additionally, music retailers provide a valuable role in their city’s cultivated image, but even this is a collaboration between the retailers and consumers.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the function of vinyl records within the purview of tourism studies and positions as an original contribution connecting music consumption and tourism practices.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2009

Francesc González‐Reverté and Oriol Miralbell‐Izard

The purpose of this paper is to assess the touristic potential of music festivals in Catalonia. It is an opportune goal because even though this region is experiencing an…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the touristic potential of music festivals in Catalonia. It is an opportune goal because even though this region is experiencing an important increase of new festivals and cultural events, there is a lack of adequate coordinating and guiding tourism policies.

Design/methodology/approach

The data was gathered with a survey to managers of music festivals that provided information about their management structure and economic results. The study findings are the result of an analysis done with a statistical multivariate technique and constructing indicators of event economic feasibility and tourism specialisation.

Findings

Data reveals the coexistence of two different types of festivals in Catalonia depending on their cultural or touristic orientation and with clear differences in their management style. Both types have a professionalized management structure and an economic self‐sufficiency when compared with the rest of Catalan cultural events, so they can be considered as an asset for regional tourism development. Nevertheless, some problems are detected in management practices that should be improved when implementing a specific tourism event policy.

Originality/value

The research has built a unique event data base that can be useful for decision making in tourism public administration. The paper suggests that local and regional administration should consider music festivals and cultural events, in general, as excellent resources to create new tourism products. Some of the characteristics of festivals, such as their important potential as tourism attractions and their cultural identity or the economical success, are critical assets to their high potential in local tourism development. These findings should justify a more resolute public policy of events and music festivals in Catalonia.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 64 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

David Leaver and Ruth A. Schmidt

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the nature of music‐based tourism in the context of the childhood locations of music icons from the 1950s and 1960s. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the nature of music‐based tourism in the context of the childhood locations of music icons from the 1950s and 1960s. The Beatles, Bob Dylan, Buddy Holly and Elvis Presley are selected and fieldwork is carried out in Hibbing, Liverpool, Lubbock, Memphis and Tupelo.

Design/methodology/approach

A normative approach is chosen using existing work on music‐based tourism as a backdrop. Key informant interviews are the main sources of primary data with a snowball technique used to gain access. Content and theme analysis is used.

Findings

Music‐based tourism is emotion driven with ideas of pilgrimage, nostalgia and heritage centring on sites of production of music; birth and death of individual artists; and places which shaped their early history. The demographic base of this market segment is widening to include both “baby‐boomers” and younger visitors for whom these music icons have become part of pop culture. It is important to recognise the sensitivities of these visitors and authenticity is a key factor.

Originality/value

This study is of interest to managers involved in promoting tourism and the marketing of place. It provides detail from major cities such as Liverpool to small towns such as Hibbing, Minnesota with a population of 18,000.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2014

Inmaculada Diaz Soria, Asunción Blanco-Romero and Gemma Canoves I. Valiente

– The purpose of this paper is to focus on territorial dynamics generated by five music festivals in the Emporda region (Spain) and its tourism sector.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on territorial dynamics generated by five music festivals in the Emporda region (Spain) and its tourism sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Using qualitative methodology, 10 qualified informants were interviewed. Their answers were coded and analysed.

Findings

Territorial features favour the organisation of festivals. Promoters wish to offer some added value using local products. Festivals broadcast local identity to the world. Festivals’ features as tourist products explain how they are perceived as innovative.

Practical implications

These existing products are being further developed to meet cultural tourism requirements. This strategy is justified by the search for innovation in a fiercely global competitive context.

Originality/value

Current paper focuses on a present product and analyses its transformation: how a territory uses an old strategy in a new way generating future opportunities for tourism sector and local economies.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Martinette Kruger and Melville Saayman

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether a music festival leads to additional intangible benefits such as the appreciation of the specific music genre and music

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether a music festival leads to additional intangible benefits such as the appreciation of the specific music genre and music tourism. This was done by using visitors’ behavioural intentions related to these benefits as a tool for market segmentation.

Design/methodology/approach

The research followed a quantitative approach by conducting a visitor survey at an international jazz festival in South Africa.

Findings

The results showed that visitors’ post-festival behavioural intentions are a useful market segmentation tool. This approach revealed three distinct market segments with different levels of post-festival behavioural intentions (high, medium, and low). The results further showed that music festivals have the potential to create benefits beyond the festival itself or the host destination in the form of music tourism and the appreciation of a music genre. However, influencing visitors’ behavioural intentions can only be achieved by a thorough understanding of the characteristics of the market.

Originality/value

This research applied an innovative market segmentation approach that showed the post-festival behavioural intentions of different visitor segments at a music festival. The findings confirm that music festivals can have far-reaching benefits that can contribute to their legacy.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 February 2020

Maria Gorete Dinis, Celeste Eusébio and Zélia Breda

This paper aims to present a framework to analyse whether information published on social media is accessible for people with disabilities (PwD), namely, visual and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a framework to analyse whether information published on social media is accessible for people with disabilities (PwD), namely, visual and hearing disabilities, with an application to a music festival.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology used in this exploratory study consists of establishing a recommended framework to assess social media accessibility for PwD, especially for people with visual and hearing disabilities (PwVHD), and analyse, through an observation grid, if the information published on the official pages of the “Rock in Rio Lisboa” music festival on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and YouTube is accessible for this target audience.

Findings

The results indicate that, although the Rock in Rio Lisboa music festival is promoted as a festival for all, posts on social media are not accessible for people with visual and/or hearing disabilities and do not meet most of the defined parameters established in the proposed assessment framework.

Originality/value

Social media accessibility has not been analysed in previous research in the tourism context. This paper aims to fill in the void by establishing criteria and parameters that can serve as a basis for a framework for accessibility assessment in social media for PwVHD.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2020

Emma Harriet Wood and Maarit Kinnunen

This study aims to explore how emotionally rich collective experiences create lasting, shareable memories, which influence future behaviours. In particular, the role of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how emotionally rich collective experiences create lasting, shareable memories, which influence future behaviours. In particular, the role of others and of music in creating value through memories is considered using the concept of socially extended emotions.

Design/methodology/approach

Over 250 narratives were gathered from festival attendees in the UK and Finland. Respondents completed a writing task detailing their most vivid memories, what made them memorable, their feelings at the time and as they remembered them, and how they shared them. The narratives were then analysed thematically.

Findings

Collective emotion continues to be co-created long after the experience through memory-sharing. The music listened to is woven through this extension of the experience but is, surprisingly, not a critical part of it. The sociality of the experience is remembered most and was key to the memories shared afterwards. The added value of gathering memorable moments, and being able to share them with others, is clearly evidenced.

Practical implications

The study highlights the importance of designing events to create collective emotional moments that form lasting memories. This emphasizes the role of post-experience marketing and customer relationship building to enhance the value that is created customer-to-customer via memory sharing.

Originality/value

The research addresses the lack of literature exploring post-event experience journeys and the collective nature of these. It also deepens a theoretical understanding of the role of time and sociality in the co-creation and extension of emotions and their value in hospitality consumption. A model is proposed to guide future research.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2011

Nnamdi O. Madichie

This paper seeks to highlight hip‐hop's contribution to the entrepreneurship and place marketing literature. Hip‐hop is taken from the lens of an individual artist, Akon…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to highlight hip‐hop's contribution to the entrepreneurship and place marketing literature. Hip‐hop is taken from the lens of an individual artist, Akon, whose music and lyrics – a “hybrid of silky, West African‐styled vocals mixed with North America's East Coast and Southern beats” – provides fresh insights for place marketers.

Design/methodology/approach

A “discourse analysis” of the lyrics from two non‐chart songs Senegal and Mama Africa provided the conceptual base for a better understanding of the fusion of music and entrepreneurship with place marketing.

Findings

Through music, Akon has bridged socio‐cultural (ethnic cuisine, immigration and social exclusion, faith or spirituality) and economic attributes (notably remittances) – with implications for entrepreneurship and place marketing.

Research limitations/implications

The paper demonstrates that music and entrepreneurship can be extended to place marketing using discourse analysis. Future research may need to consider how to leverage the potential of celebrity endorsement or partnerships in place marketing strategies. It was by no accident that Akon was recruited by PepsiCo for the recently concluded 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa through a charity single – Oh Africa!

Originality/value

The paper is an attempt to fuse three distinct streams of literature (music, entrepreneurship and place marketing). The value lies in extrapolating a well‐known, but little discussed, subject in academia, i.e. the role of hip‐hop music in the place marketing discourse.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

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