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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Martinette Kruger and Melville Saayman

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether a music festival leads to additional intangible benefits such as the appreciation of the specific music genre and music

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether a music festival leads to additional intangible benefits such as the appreciation of the specific music genre and music tourism. This was done by using visitors’ behavioural intentions related to these benefits as a tool for market segmentation.

Design/methodology/approach

The research followed a quantitative approach by conducting a visitor survey at an international jazz festival in South Africa.

Findings

The results showed that visitors’ post-festival behavioural intentions are a useful market segmentation tool. This approach revealed three distinct market segments with different levels of post-festival behavioural intentions (high, medium, and low). The results further showed that music festivals have the potential to create benefits beyond the festival itself or the host destination in the form of music tourism and the appreciation of a music genre. However, influencing visitors’ behavioural intentions can only be achieved by a thorough understanding of the characteristics of the market.

Originality/value

This research applied an innovative market segmentation approach that showed the post-festival behavioural intentions of different visitor segments at a music festival. The findings confirm that music festivals can have far-reaching benefits that can contribute to their legacy.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 22 August 2011

Margaret Lam

How does one classify instructional videos uploaded by musicians of different caliber and mastery on video‐sharing sites? What kinds of communities are forming around…

Abstract

Purpose

How does one classify instructional videos uploaded by musicians of different caliber and mastery on video‐sharing sites? What kinds of communities are forming around these content sources? How does one address the different perception and understanding of what music means to a diverse audience? How does one identify and address the needs of new kinds of users, who learn how to play music by using primarily online resources? While this paper does not seek to directly address all these questions, it aims to raise them with the aim of contextualizing the discussion as a necessary foundation to effectively address the more practical questions above.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a knowledge organization model of music knowledge based on the concept of musicianship as used in music education. A balanced and holistic approach is sought, especially in light of the interdisciplinary nature of the challenge being addressed. Drawing on Hjørland's work on domain analysis, and Hennion's concept of the user of music, this paper discusses music as a domain, music as information, and music as knowledge.

Findings

In particular, the concept of listening and genre are considered important ways through which one mediates one's understanding of music as knowledge. There are four “layers” in the model: Vocabulary of Music; Structures and Patterns of Music; Appreciation of Music; and Cultural‐Historical Contexts.

Originality/value

The model addresses knowledge organization challenges specific to the domain of music.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2010

Shiori Sasaki, Kiku Watagoshi, Kosuke Takano, Kazuo Hirashima and Yasushi Kiyoki

The purpose of this paper is to present the design and implementation of music courseware that features a music search system that uses impression keywords. The paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the design and implementation of music courseware that features a music search system that uses impression keywords. The paper applies the courseware to Kansei (sensibility) development for elementary and junior high school students. The objectives of this courseware are to cultivate children's sensitivity to the mood of a music selection; an understanding of the effects of tonality on the mood of the music; and) an ability to appreciate and express music through activities such as searching, selecting, and listening while also utilizing information about musical impression. The courseware is also designed to support teachers who do not specialize in music education.

Design/methodology/approach

Music courseware is designed containing the following three components: a semantic associative search engine that enables the retrieval of media data related to impression keywords selected by users; interfaces and tools for music retrieval and learning, which support users as they study the mood of the music in an easy‐to‐understand format using basic music teaching scenarios; and basic music teaching scenarios that are designed and created by elementary school teachers to encourage student understandings of the tonality and mood of the music in a practical manner.

Findings

The results of several qualitative and quantitative experiments show that this courseware assists children in independently learning musical elements by feeling, understanding, and expressing music impressions using words from the courseware that are extracted automatically from musical elements, such as key, rhythm, tempo, pitch, melody, and harmony.

Research limitations/implications

Additional applications in various elementary and junior high school settings are needed to address a variety of practical, real‐life teaching scenarios.

Social implications

This courseware have the potential to support enrichment programs not only in ordinary schools but also in a wide range of non‐educational settings, such as welfare care, disability care, and cross‐cultural communication.

Originality/value

The main feature of this courseware is its multimedia database technology, which applies Kansei to music education, thereby enabling students to understand the mood and structure of music based on their own subjective impressions using an objective framework.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

T. Dary Erwin

– The purpose of this paper is to refine and measure esthetic development.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to refine and measure esthetic development.

Design/methodology/approach

Three phrases of data collection were conducted utilizing four separate student samples (n = 120, 154, 241, and 343). In Phase I, an initial esthetic development stage model was tested with a constructed response test format using generalizability measurement theory. In Phase II, this conceptual model in esthetic development was refined with a modified constructed response format. In Phase III, a selective response test format was designed with five esthetic development stage scores, which were correlated with several artistic discipline-based and interdisciplinary courses.

Findings

Higher esthetic development stages correlate with verbal ability and grades in interdisciplinary general education arts courses. Lower esthetic development stages were associated with lower verbal ability and grades in traditionally taught discipline-based arts courses.

Research limitations/implications

What this study did not do is examine whether attendance at arts events and activities support or lead to higher esthetic development.

Social implications

People at Stages Four and Five of this esthetic development model are able to compare artistic experience – whether visual or performing art – within a historical and cultural context or perspective. Individuals at these highest stages are able to communicate about the social significance and societal themes of the artistic experience to wider audiences.

Originality/value

No accepted model or assessment method about the arts in higher education is available. Although the arts are commonly accepted as important in higher education, there is a paucity of research about esthetic development in the curriculum. This paper attempts to address this gap, in part, and to advance further study about quality of arts’ programs and activities in higher education.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1980

Karen Markey, Pauline Atherton and Claudia Newton

A series of studies was performed in late 1978 and early 1979 by the ERIC Clearinghouse on Information Resources Special Project staff and consultants to discover how ERIC…

Abstract

A series of studies was performed in late 1978 and early 1979 by the ERIC Clearinghouse on Information Resources Special Project staff and consultants to discover how ERIC online searchers were using free and controlled vocabulary in their search statements. Over 40 experienced ERIC online searchers were interviewed and more than half of these volunteered to show us their activity online. Over 650 search traces from 18 different ERIC online searchers using three different retrieval systems were analyzed. Findings show that controlled vocabulary terms are used in 68% of ERIC searches. Controlled vocabulary searching is higher if only terms which resulted in offline printed output are considered. The use of free text was more carefully scrutinized to see if we could discover ways to improve the ERIC database and its online access, since free text searchers have few online search aids besides the basic index with postings information. The vocabulary in 165 free text search statements was analyzed to determine whether ERIC descriptors and identifiers were incapable of representing these concepts. Information for every free text statement was sought on the following questions: (1) Is it a descriptor? (2) Is it cross‐referenced to an accepted term? (3) Is it a variant of a descriptor? (4) Is it expressible using descriptors? (5) Is it expressible using identifiers? (6) Is it only expressible using free text? Five tables summarize the output results of our comparative analysis of free text and controlled vocabulary searching. Six categories of search concepts were discovered for which searchers could only input free text terms or phrases. Online searching tests comparing free and controlled vocabulary were performed using six search topics. The free text search formulations had higher recall and controlled vocabulary formulations had higher precision. Search objective (high recall or high precision), we concluded, should dictate which formulation to use. All our findings helped point to the need for new searching aids for online ERIC searchers. Four displays exhibit what these might be; for example, an on‐line rotated descriptor or identifier display, and some linkage between free text and the Thesaurus. Responsible agents for effecting changes in searching ERIC online are identified and suggestions for improvements are addressed to these three agents.

Details

Online Review, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-314X

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Jason MacVaugh and Francesco Schiavone

The purpose of this article is to integrate existing theoretical explanations for innovation diffusion across the disciplines of marketing, innovation and sociology research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to integrate existing theoretical explanations for innovation diffusion across the disciplines of marketing, innovation and sociology research.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature reviews and historical case analysis were used to support an integrative model.

Findings

Innovation diffusion is affected by technological, social and learning “conditions” while operating in the contextual “domain” of the individual, community or market/industry.

Research limitations/implications

The model is drawn from new product development and marketing theory. Both fields are dominated by the assumption that users adopt new technology to maximise their utility. Also, the model does not integrate the overlapping effects of the different contexts and domains.

Practical implications

The article provides a sound model for orienting new product development strategy, since it may reduce the risk of low and slow user adoption of radical innovations due, for instance, to their technological, social, and cognitive differences with former products. A second critical managerial implication is that technological, social and learning conditions clearly have an effect on marketing actions and competitive strategies.

Originality/value

The article provides a literature review of resistance to technology adoption through a multidisciplinary lens.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2018

Gaohui Cao, Mengli Liang and Xuguang Li

This paper aims to clearly conceptualize the idea of the smart library and propose a holistic approach to building smart libraries, in accordance with recent practices and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to clearly conceptualize the idea of the smart library and propose a holistic approach to building smart libraries, in accordance with recent practices and state-of-the-art technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on an extensive review of existing literature and practice about library construction, this paper distinguishes between similar types of smart library and divides the concepts associated with smart library building into three dimensions: technology, service and human.

Findings

Traditional libraries can transform to smart libraries by strategic design and implementation of advanced technologies, such as cloud computing, data mining and artificial intelligence, but they also need to consider service building, user cultivation and librarian training.

Originality/value

Aligning to the three main dimensions of smart libraries (technology, service and human), this study clarifies the concept of the smart library and offers strategic principles: integration of infrastructures, construction of service and human learning. It provides guidelines and directions for public and academic libraries committed to becoming smart libraries.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 27 September 2011

Nan Zhang

This paper aims to explore the roles Web 2.0 applications play in niche cultures such as rock music diffusion.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the roles Web 2.0 applications play in niche cultures such as rock music diffusion.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper aims to examine the influence of online forums on fans of rock music and to validate the intermediating roles of the cognitive variables.

Findings

The results show that the three factors associated with innovation diffusion theory play different intermediating roles in the relationship between the stickiness of online forums (their ability to make users stay longer and return) and the levels of appreciation displayed by fans of rock music. While stickiness shows a significant positive impact on an individual's perception and image of a rock band, visibility has a significant negative influence on the individual's level of enthusiasm for the band.

Research limitations/implications

Additional data and measures are required for in‐depth investigations of other cultural contexts.

Practical implications

The study could be helpful for determining the influence of online forums on rock music diffusion and for planning innovative promotions and sales strategies for rock bands. Moreover the findings could be applicable to the marketing and promotion of other niche culture items.

Originality/value

This study's originality lies in confirming the intermediating roles of the cognitive variables based on innovation diffusion theory between online forums' stickiness and appreciation of rock bands by using a mixed qualitative and quantitative approach and then by showing the opportunities and challenges provided by networking to rock music.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Book part
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Noah Askin and Joeri Mol

Since the arrival of mass production, commodification has been plaguing markets – none more so than that for music. By separating production and consumption in space and…

Abstract

Since the arrival of mass production, commodification has been plaguing markets – none more so than that for music. By separating production and consumption in space and time, commodification challenges the very conditions underlying economic exchange. This chapter explores authenticity as the institutional response to the commodification of music, rekindling the relationship between isolated market participants in the increasingly digitized world of music. Building upon the “Production of Culture” perspective, we unpack the commodification of music across five different institutional realms – (1) production, (2) consumption, (3) selection, (4) appropriation, and (5) classification – and provide a thoroughly relational account of authenticity as an institutional practice.

Details

Frontiers of Creative Industries: Exploring Structural and Categorical Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-773-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Martin Ashley

A growing literature is now claiming that participation in the arts, and music in particular, is beneficial to health. Whilst some claims are made for music benefiting…

Abstract

A growing literature is now claiming that participation in the arts, and music in particular, is beneficial to health. Whilst some claims are made for music benefiting physiological health, the main benefit would seem to be for gains in emotional wellbeing. There is a gender dimension to participation in music, with girls being more likely to participate, and boys who wish to sing or play certain instruments facing the disapproval of a “macho” peer culture. The paper reports on qualitative research carried out into the views of 18 boy singers in a well‐known church choir in England, using observation, diary keeping, individual and group interviews. The boys showed a deep appreciation of and engagement with the music. They exhibited many features of high personal wellbeing, including the social competence to circumscribe the proscriptions of “macho” culture. Those from state schools were very critical of the superficial way singing was tackled in their schools. Secondary schools were reported as being more accepting of their singing than primary schools. All the boys were academic high achievers and were particularly keen on autonomous reading, again being critical of the guided reading offered by their schools. The paper concludes that state schools could do more to involve young people, including boys, in singing, and to take the subject more seriously, but acknowledges that the pressures on state schools to deliver literacy and numeracy are making this difficult.

Details

Health Education, vol. 102 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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