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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2009

Murray E. Jennex, Stefan Smolnik and David T. Croasdell

The purpose of this paper is to propose a definition of KMS success.

3061

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a definition of KMS success.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a consensus‐building approach to derive the definition. An expert panel was used to generate a list of possible KM success definitions. A survey was used to identify a likely definition from this list. A second survey was used to further refine the proposed KM success definition. Finally, analysis of the survey comments was used to finalize the proposed definition.

Findings

KM success is a multidimensional concept. It is defined by capturing the right knowledge, getting the right knowledge to the right user, and using this knowledge to improve organizational and/or individual performance. KM success is measured by means of the dimensions: impact on business processes, impact on strategy, leadership, and knowledge content.

Research limitations/implications

An additional survey should be performed that tests the constructs of the proposed KM success definition. Additionally, future research should focus on identifying a set of measures that can be used to measure KM success and determining whether KM and KM System (KMS), success are the same or different constructs.

Practical implications

The proposed definition of KM success provides practitioners with four dimensions that can be used to construct organization‐specific measures for indicating when their KM initiative is successful.

Originality/value

This is important, as the literature, while providing much support for identifying KM critical success factors, does not provide a definition of when KM can be considered successful. Knowing when a KM initiative is successful is important for organizations and practitioners.

Content available

Abstract

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

111

Abstract

Details

Internet Research, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Takahiko Kajiyama, Murray Jennex and Theophilus Addo

This paper aims to discover factors that are truly affecting cloud adoption decisions in organizations. Many reasons have been given for the adoption, or lack thereof, of…

1494

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discover factors that are truly affecting cloud adoption decisions in organizations. Many reasons have been given for the adoption, or lack thereof, of the cloud.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses an empirical approach by means of an exploratory survey, using descriptive statistics and t-tests to determine significant differences among various response groups.

Findings

The findings reveal that current and prospective cloud users feel that public cloud computing is less secure than on premise systems. These users feel that the public cloud may still be currently too immature for mission-critical system deployments; however, they do expect it to be more secure in the future as the service models become more mature and better technologies become available. None of the cloud adoption risk factors were universally considered to be showstoppers with respect to adoption.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size is relatively small compared to the number of cloud participants. Additionally, respondents were concentrated in the high technology industries in Southern California.

Originality/value

The paper provides some valuable insight into cloud adoption and concludes that despite hyped security fears, the risks and threats of the cloud are well understood and that with proper planning and implementation, organizations can adopt cloud technologies with no additional risk.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Murray Eugene Jennex

The purpose of the paper is to propose a methodology for organizations to use to assess the risk of knowledge loss should a specific employee leave. The article also…

1226

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to propose a methodology for organizations to use to assess the risk of knowledge loss should a specific employee leave. The article also proposes actions that can be taken by the organization to capture this knowledge before it is lost.

Design/methodology/approach

Applied research based on the systems analysis approach.

Findings

The paper finds that it is possible to create a system for identifying which knowledge is most likely to be lost and to guide an organization towards the appropriate actions for capturing that knowledge before it is lost.

Research limitations/implications

The process has only been piloted on a single organization and with a limited number of subjects. However, the results are promising, and future research is focused on exploring generalizability.

Practical implications

The paper provides a process that will assist managers in making better decisions when allocating resources for capturing knowledge from departing individuals.

Social implications

The process introduces a new social dynamic in the assessment of individuals which may have an impact on organizational dynamics.

Originality/value

This is a very innovative and original application of traditional risk assessment principles.

Details

VINE: The journal of information and knowledge management systems, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Antonio-Luis Gamo-Sanchez and Juan-Gabriel Cegarra-Navarro

This paper aims to investigate the nature of what is referred to as the Knowledge Management Engineering & Maintenance Program, which is based on practices that influence…

1019

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the nature of what is referred to as the Knowledge Management Engineering & Maintenance Program, which is based on practices that influence the dissemination of knowledge in a structured and sustained manner within a small-sized airport. The air transport system has undergone important changes, particularly in the development of new knowledge management (KM) approaches. In practice, however, results have been mixed. Some programs have been successful, but implementation failures are common and the intended users are frequently reluctant to use such management structures. A possible explanation for efficiency and effectiveness gaps of services provided by these knowledge structures may relate to the advantages and disadvantages of the knowledge processes that airports highlight as a result of their differential structural properties.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data collected from the Engineering & Maintenance Department at a Spanish Airport, this work has examined how the existence of some knowledge structures is linked to knowledge transfer and how this component is linked to customer service (external users, e.g. passengers; and internal users, including any airport staff).

Findings

This paper reports a KM program, which is customized and based on four knowledge structures: technical infrastructure; people to facilitate and drive the process; a system that supports and rewards sharing; and the team leader.

Research limitations/implications

Conducting this type of single case study (an interview-based case study approach) is to be understood foremost as a prelude to further quantitative studies including common measures for passengers and users, staff, managers and board members.

Originality/value

In an applied sense, the model provides engineering and maintenance practitioners with identifiable factors, which enable the four frameworks and address the relevant issues by changing strategies at both the individual and the organizational levels. Without a KM program, practitioners may lose the ability to see the market signals stemming from the transport system members and they may decide to go solely by their own ways of doing and interpreting things.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 November 2012

Kamla Ali Al‐Busaidi

The purpose of this paper is to empirically assess the payoffs of a corporate portal in an academic institution in Oman and its impacts on business processes and employees.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically assess the payoffs of a corporate portal in an academic institution in Oman and its impacts on business processes and employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The study included 100 employees, mostly instructors, in an academic institution. The questionnaire included indicators related to the portal usage, employees’ benefits (learning, adaptability and job satisfaction) and business processes’ benefits (effectiveness, efficiency and innovativeness) constructs. Data were analyzed by PLS‐Graph 3.0, a variance‐based structural equation modeling software.

Findings

Results revealed that corporate portal has significant returns on employees’ learning, adaptability and job satisfaction, and business processes’ effectiveness, efficiency and innovation. All six hypotheses in this study were supported.

Originality/value

The paper provides empirical evidence for practitioners and researchers on the benefits of a corporate portal in an academic institution in Oman.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2011

Abstract

Details

New Directions in Information Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-171-8

Article
Publication date: 17 March 2020

Mehwish Waheed, Jane E Klobas and NoorUl Ain

Examines how perceived knowledge quality influences researchers' satisfaction with academic social media (ASM) site use, perceived learning from use, and loyalty toward the site.

Abstract

Purpose

Examines how perceived knowledge quality influences researchers' satisfaction with academic social media (ASM) site use, perceived learning from use, and loyalty toward the site.

Design/methodology/approach

Built upon the theoretical grounding of the information system success framework, it was hypothesized that satisfaction, perceived learning, and loyal behavior toward an ASM site are all functions of the perceived quality of knowledge obtained. Data were collected by online survey from 348 researchers registered on ResearchGate and subjected to SmartPLS structural equation modeling, bootstrapping, and blindfolding.

Findings

The hypothesized relationships were supported. Perceived knowledge quality significantly influences researchers' satisfaction with ASM site use, and satisfaction affects perceived learning and researchers' loyalty with the ASM site.

Research limitations/implications

Identification of the relationship between perceived knowledge quality and ASM site success extends the study of ASM sites from description of usage patterns to understanding the effect of content quality on important outcomes of use.

Practical implications

ASM sites rely on the quality of knowledge contributed by their members for satisfaction, loyalty, and perceptions of value. The ongoing success of an ASM requires directed attention to quality knowledge provision.

Originality/value

This paper contributes a simplified DeLone & McLean information system success framework for studies of content quality. It also provides fresh insights into ASM site usage through a focus on the role of perceived knowledge quality in forming satisfaction, learning, and loyalty.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 October 2011

Jarkko Kari

The basic idea of this chapter is to utilize spiritual information in empirically exploring how its purported source beings view the impacts of such information upon…

Abstract

The basic idea of this chapter is to utilize spiritual information in empirically exploring how its purported source beings view the impacts of such information upon various phenomena. This chapter aims at discovering and describing the most central effect dimensions in this context and, by so doing, at building theoretical constructs. The empirical work was done during 2005–2009 in Finland. Because of the relative novelty of the research topic, an inductive approach was applied. The research data were composed of a representative sample of 62 spiritual texts (printed books and articles, as well as Web and e-mail articles). The chapter examines the discovered categories and their subcategories, shows the most salient connections between them and discusses the findings in the context of previous research. The investigation explored two dimensions: the targets and actuality of the impacts of spiritual information. The impact targets were classified as organisms (human individuals, human communities, extraterrestrials, spirits), things (parts of beings, objects, information, situations), processes (events, practices, life) and spaces (areas, Earth, universe). The actuality of the impacts of spiritual information fell under these categories: desired (implicitly desired, intended, explicitly desired, requisitioned) impacts, real (possible, believed, factual, alternative) impacts, nonexistent (hypothetical, no) impacts, as well as conditional (on supernatural sender, information, humans, situation) and unconditional impacts. This inquiry revealed several new varieties of information impact and even built whole new typologies, because quite little was known about both the targets and actuality of the impacts of information before the present study.

Details

New Directions in Information Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-171-8

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