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Book part
Publication date: 29 August 2005

David Chan

Multivariate latent growth modeling (multivariate LGM) provides a flexible data analytic framework for representing and assessing cross-domain (i.e., between-constructs…

Abstract

Multivariate latent growth modeling (multivariate LGM) provides a flexible data analytic framework for representing and assessing cross-domain (i.e., between-constructs) relationships in intraindividual changes over time, which also allows incorporation of multiple levels of analysis. Using the chapter by Cortina, Pant, and Smith-Darden (this volume) as a point of departure, this chapter discusses important preliminary data analysis and interpretation issues prior to performing multivariate LGM analyses.

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Multi-Level Issues in Strategy and Methods
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-330-3

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Book part
Publication date: 24 November 2010

Edward E. Rigdon, Christian M. Ringle and Marko Sarstedt

Alongside structural equation modeling (SEM), the complementary technique of partial least squares (PLS) path modeling helps researchers understand relations among sets of…

Abstract

Alongside structural equation modeling (SEM), the complementary technique of partial least squares (PLS) path modeling helps researchers understand relations among sets of observed variables. Like SEM, PLS began with an assumption of homogeneity – one population and one model – but has developed techniques for modeling data from heterogeneous populations, consistent with a marketing emphasis on segmentation. Heterogeneity can be expressed through interactions and nonlinear terms. Additionally, researchers can use multiple group analysis and latent class methods. This chapter reviews these techniques for modeling heterogeneous data in PLS, and illustrates key developments in finite mixture modeling in PLS using the SmartPLS 2.0 package.

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Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-475-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1990

Mohamed E. Ibrahim, Saad A. Metawae and Ibrahim M. Aly

In recent years, a sizeable amount of research in finance and accounting has been devoted to the issue of bond rating and bond rating changes. A major thrust of these…

Abstract

In recent years, a sizeable amount of research in finance and accounting has been devoted to the issue of bond rating and bond rating changes. A major thrust of these research efforts was to develop and test some prediction‐based models using mainly financial ratios and their trends. This paper tests the ability of statistical decomposition analysis of financial statements to predict bond rating changes. The results show that the decomposition analysis almost does not beat the a priori probability model and is no better than multiple discriminant analysis using simple financial ratios. One important piece of information for participants in debt markets is the assessment of the relative risk associated with a particular bond issue, commonly known as bond ratings. These ratings, however, are not usually fixed for the life of the issues. From time to time, the rating agencies review their ratings of the outstanding bond issues and make changes to these ratings (either upward or downward) when needed. Over the years, researchers have attempted to develop and test some prediction based models in order to predict bond ratings or bond rating changes. These prediction models have employed some variables that are assumed to reflect the rating agency decision‐making activities. Although the rating process is complicated and based mainly on judgmental considerations, Hawkins, Brown and Campbell (1983, p. 95) reported that the academic research strongly suggests that a reliable estimate of a potential bond rating or rating change can be determined by a few key financial ratios. Information theory decomposition measures have received in recent years considerable attention as a potential tool for predicting corporate events, namely corporate bankruptcy (e.g., Lev 1970; Moyer 1977; Walker, Stowe and Moriarity 1979; Booth 1983). The underlying proposition in these studies is that corporate failure, as an event, is expected to be preceded by significant changes in the company's assets and liabilities structure. Although the event of bond rating changes is different from the bankruptcy event in terms of consequences, one can still propose that a bond rating change, as a corporate event, is also expected to be preceded by some significant changes in the company's assets and liabilities structure. Therefore, the decomposition analysis may have a predictive ability in the case of bond rating changes. The purpose of this paper is to empirically test and compare the classification and predictive accuracy of the decomposition analysis with the performance of a multiple discriminant model that uses financial ratios and their trends in the context of bond rating changes.

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Managerial Finance, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 5 July 2021

Jian Li, Yanping Gong, Julan Xie and Yuxuan Tan

The purpose of this study is to employ a user-centered approach to identify subgroups of people with similar profiles based on their perceptions of multiple dimensions of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to employ a user-centered approach to identify subgroups of people with similar profiles based on their perceptions of multiple dimensions of digital products' coolness and to test the differences across subgroups in the intention to use these products.

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, 1,161 adults rated a virtual digital product on four dimensions of coolness. In Study 2, 660 college students made similar ratings and also reported their intention to use a real digital product. Participants' ratings were analyzed using a user-centered approach, namely latent profile analysis.

Findings

Study 1 identified groups of participants who had similar profiles of product ratings on the four dimensions of coolness: niche cool, mass cool, uncertain cool and uncool. Study 2 replicated the findings of Study 1 and in addition showed that these groups varied in their intention to use the product and in whether a specific dimension increased or decreased this intention.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional data preclude inferences about causality, calling for experimental or longitudinal research. Additionally, future research should explore whether the results generalize to other product categories and other age groups.

Practical implications

Managers should design digital products, segment the market and develop flexible strategies based on combined responses to dimensions of coolness perception.

Originality/value

The present research employed a user-centered approach to identify groups of people who share similar patterns of coolness perception. This study provides new insight that was not available in variable-centered research.

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Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 1989

Bruce C. Payne

For years institutional investors have concentrated their holdings of common stock in a relatively small group, the “institutional favorites.” While the market performance…

Abstract

For years institutional investors have concentrated their holdings of common stock in a relatively small group, the “institutional favorites.” While the market performance and changes in the composition of institutional favorites were reported in financial literature from the 1950s, no recent studies concerning the characteristics of firms classified as institutional favorites have been presented. The purpose of this study is to establish a financial profile for firms currently favored by financial institutions, and to determine whether these firms differ significantly from firms selected at random. It is concerned with those variables that are indicators ofthe firm’s risk‐return trade off character. As in previous studies of this nature, Multiple Discriminant Analysis was used. The results were somewhat surprising in that institutions did not seem to be drawn to what are perceived to be growth firms. As was expected, however, institutional favorites were larger in size than firms selected at random.

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American Journal of Business, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Kevin K. Byon, Soonhwan Lee and Thomas A. Baker

The purpose of this paper is: to explain the relative influence of attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control on purchase intention of the 2010 FIFA World…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is: to explain the relative influence of attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control on purchase intention of the 2010 FIFA World Cup sponsored products; and to compare the purchase intention of American and Korean spectators toward sponsoring products of the 2010 FIFA World Cup. The structural equation modeling (SEM) revealed that subjective norm and perceived behavioral control were predictors of purchase intention. Further, multiple group analysis revealed that the path coefficient between subjective norm and purchase intention for the two groups was significantly different.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administered questionnaire was developed to measure the four constructs of the theory of planned behavior (TBP) as well as demographic information. Upon completion of the psychometric properties test of the TPB, a SEM was conducted to examine the proposed hypotheses. The same fit indices as with the measurement model were adopted to evaluate the model fit. Finally, a multi-group analysis was conducted to examine if the proposed relationships are different based on nationality (American vs Korean samples). A comparison of χ2 value between unconstrained and constrained models was employed to assess whether the two groups are statistically different.

Findings

SEM revealed that subjective norm and perceived behavioral control were predictors of purchase intention. In this study, a multi-group analysis was conducted to examine if the proposed relationships in our model are different based on nationality. As a result, we found that two groups (i.e. American vs Korean) exhibited notable differences in subjective norms in determining purchase intentions of the 2010 FIFA World Cup sponsored products.

Originality/value

Sponsors for mega sporting events, like the FIFA World Cup, must develop global marketing plans that appeal to worldwide audiences. Sport marketers, therefore, need cross-cultural marketing analysis on equivalence and bias so that they better understand how spectators from different cultures behave after consuming the same event. Thus, application of the TPB in cross-cultural studies aimed at understanding consumer intention after spectating the FIFA World Cup would provide marketers with valuable information for the formation of global marketing strategies.

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Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2020

Prachi Vinod Ingle, Gangadhar Mahesh and Deepak M.D.

The construction industry is facing challenges because of performance shortfalls. Construction projects are highly complex, distinctive, fragmented and do not have…

Abstract

Purpose

The construction industry is facing challenges because of performance shortfalls. Construction projects are highly complex, distinctive, fragmented and do not have well-established performance assessment models to evaluate their project success. The purpose of this paper is to assess the direction through determination of performance areas that would affect project performance in Indian construction projects.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey instrument was developed to gather data on the perception of industry professionals on these identified areas. Purposive sampling method was used to select respondents for the survey. These performance areas are ranked using relative importance index to ascertain a level of importance among the group. Factor analysis (FA) was conducted to identify the significant performance areas project performance. Further to identify the most influence performance areas on Indian construction projects, multiple regression analysis was carried out.

Findings

Findings indicated 28 significant performance areas. This shows the low level of adoption of good construction management practices in Indian construction projects. FA resulted in the areas being grouped to nine broad significant performance areas with 59.49% of the total variance, namely, quality, schedule, environment and stakeholder satisfactions, cost, productivity, safety, communication management, customer relations and finance. Multiple regression analysis revealed two pivotal factors “customer relations” and “schedule” that significantly influence project performance in Indian construction industry.

Originality/value

The outcome of the study will guide project stakeholders, who desire to improve project performance on construction projects, to prioritize their efforts. It also highlights performance areas of project management which required more focussed research in the context of Indian construction projects. The findings can be extended to the developing countries.

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Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2007

Jeffrey L. Lennon and David W. Coombs

The purpose of this study is to test the effectiveness of an educational board game for increasing knowledge, positive attitudes‐beliefs, and self‐efficacy for dengue…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to test the effectiveness of an educational board game for increasing knowledge, positive attitudes‐beliefs, and self‐efficacy for dengue prevention in a sample of Philippine school children and adolescents. Effective board games are more advantageous than lectures because they are adaptable, inexpensive and foster learning independently of teachers or lecturers. Also tested were relationships between perceived fun by students playing the game and outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

A school‐based pre‐test/post‐test experimentally controlled design was employed in a Filipino primary and secondary school population.

Findings

The lecture was more effective in increasing knowledge. But neither was more effective than the other in increasing positive attitudes‐beliefs and self‐efficacy. Both modes produced specifically significant increases in knowledge and self‐efficacy; only the lecture produced significant increases in attitudes‐beliefs. Also, there was a significant relationship between fun and self‐efficacy in the game group at the reduced regression model level but not in the presence of all study variables.

Research limitations/implications

No long term outcomes or behavioral change outcomes were measured. However, an educational game may increase knowledge and self‐efficacy about the dengue fever without the assistance of a teacher or other pre‐game instructional aids. In addition, the board game technique is flexible and easily adapted to other community or school health issues.

Originality/value

This was the first experimentally controlled study on the use of a game with the topic of dengue. The study on the use of a game was the first to demonstrate a significant increase in self‐efficacy as a result of the play of a board game. Original instruments measured self‐efficacy related to dengue control and also the variable of fun.

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Health Education, vol. 107 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2012

Alexander Settles and Valentina Kuskova

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to examine methodological trends in emerging market strategy research and to provide a comprehensive review of methods of…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this chapter is to examine methodological trends in emerging market strategy research and to provide a comprehensive review of methods of assessing group variation in comparative studies.

Methodology/approach – This comprises a systematic review of the methodology of emerging market research over the past 10 years, followed by methodological best practices for comparative studies involving emerging and mature markets, with exemplars from the past research.

Findings – Despite previous calls for more comparative studies in emerging market research, most of the literature is reporting on single-country studies. There is some confusion in terminology and the methods used in this area of strategy research. Increased attention to the “East” calls for a reevaluation of methods utilized in comparative studies. The methods described in this chapter present best practices for comparative research.

Social implications – More comparative studies would substantially expand our understanding of the differences between the emerging and developed markets, and the potential impact of emerging markets on global economy. Rigorous research methods extend validity and generalizability of the studies.

Originality/value – This chapter is the first study to date to analyze the methodological trends of the entire field of emerging market research over the span of 10 years and to provide systematic methodological recommendations tailored to analyzing variation in comparative studies.

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West Meets East: Toward Methodological Exchange
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-026-0

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Article
Publication date: 22 October 2020

June-Hyuk Kwon, Seung-Hye Jung, Hyun-Ju Choi and Joonho Kim

This study aims to empirically analyze the effects of marketing communications, such as advertisement/promotion and social network service (SNS) content, on consumer…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to empirically analyze the effects of marketing communications, such as advertisement/promotion and social network service (SNS) content, on consumer engagement (CE), brand trust and brand loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

The study’s participants were 230 US and 376 Korean consumers who have used (i.e. contacted) a food service establishment (i.e. family restaurant) at least once before and who continue to use an SNS (e.g. Facebook and Instagram). This study conducted a hypothesis test using structural equation modeling analysis. In addition, hierarchical analysis was performed to further generalize and support the statistical analysis results.

Findings

Advertisement/promotion and SNS content have a statistically significant positive effect on CE. Advertisement/promotion has a statistically significant positive effect on brand trust, and SNS content has a statistically significant negative effect on brand trust. CE has a statistically significant positive effect on brand trust, and CE and brand trust have a statistically significant positive effect on brand loyalty. No statistically significant differences were shown between the US and Korean consumer groups (critical ratios for difference of path coefficient < ± 1.96). The hypothesis test results of the structural equation model analysis and hierarchical analysis were the same for the entire group.

Originality/value

The findings indicate that the overall mediating role of CE is important. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to investigate which marketing communication channels are most effective in the restaurant sector.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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1 – 10 of over 115000