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1 – 10 of over 28000
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Walter Sumetzberger

To develop more sensitivity for different patterns of human resource management in multinational companies.

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Abstract

Purpose

To develop more sensitivity for different patterns of human resource management in multinational companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Systemic approach; the concepts and models are based on the evaluation of consulting projects in the field of human resource management.

Findings

A concept of four typical varieties of human resource management, a model and important aspects for designing the cooperation processes between human resource departments and company management in multinational companies.

Originality/value

This paper provides a complex mindset about human resource management in a multinational context, which is a prerequisite for designing constructive cooperation processes between human resource departments and company management and for increasing the effectiveness of human resource activities.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 29 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 June 2017

Erik Poutsma, Paul E. M. Ligthart and Ulke Veersma

Taking an international comparative approach, this chapter investigates the variance in the adoption of employee share ownership and stock option arrangements across…

Abstract

Taking an international comparative approach, this chapter investigates the variance in the adoption of employee share ownership and stock option arrangements across countries. In particular, we investigate the influence of multinational enterprises (MNEs), industrial relations factors, HRM strategies, and market economies on the adoption and spread of the arrangements across countries. We find that industrial relations factors do not explain the variance in adoption by companies in their respective countries. MNEs and HRM strategies are important drivers of adoption. Market economy does not moderate the influence of MNEs on adoption, suggesting that MNEs universally apply the arrangements across borders.

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Work, Workplaces and Disruptive Issues in HRM
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-780-0

Article
Publication date: 24 October 2008

Maral Muratbekova‐Touron

The purpose of this paper is to study the case of one French multinational company which has undergone a process of radical restructuring and “internationalization”…

17178

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the case of one French multinational company which has undergone a process of radical restructuring and “internationalization” because of acquisitions of Anglo‐Saxon multinational companies. It examines how the organizational changes influenced the company's approach to the international human resource management (IHRM).

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology of this research is the single case study. Sources of evidences are direct participation and observation, interviews with top managers, and documentation.

Findings

The results show that the ethnocentric model, when French managers were placed on the top of the foreign subsidiaries, becomes non‐efficient in the company which doubled its size and the geographical spread of its activities. It is argued that the forces of globalization constrained this multinational company to change from an ethnocentric approach to a geocentric approach to its IHRM.

Originality/value

The case demonstrates that national and organizational cultures are important contextual factors which influence the company's approach to its IHRM. The paper outlines the interconnectedness of globalization and the geocentric approach to the IHRM.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 December 2003

Danchi Tan and Joseph T Mahoney

This paper develops an integrative framework explaining multinational firms’ managerial staffing decisions in initial foreign-entry situations from resource-based theory…

Abstract

This paper develops an integrative framework explaining multinational firms’ managerial staffing decisions in initial foreign-entry situations from resource-based theory, agency theory, and transaction-costs theory, and it offers a set of theoretically grounded, testable propositions concerning these staffing decisions. In particular, we maintain that managerial staffing decisions are influenced by: (1) the value that managerial expatriates and local hires could potentially add to the firm; and (2) the relative contractual risks associated with the use of managerial expatriates and local managers.

This paper indicates that the use of managerial expatriates can improve contractual efficiencies in at least four ways. First, the use of expatriates helps align the economic incentives between the headquarters and the foreign subsidiaries. Second, the headquarters knows better the characteristics of expatriates relative to local hires. The use of expatriates reduces the uncertainty of the headquarters in recruiting managers and mitigates the incomplete contracting problem. Third, expatriates are better equipped with firm-specific capabilities than local hires, reducing contractual (small-numbers) problems. Fourth, expatriates have committed greater sunk cost investments in the multinational firm than local hires. These investments support their cooperative relationships with the firm and mitigate potential bargaining problems in employment contracting. However, although managerial expatriates can potentially improve contractual efficiency and may relieve a firm’s concern over its limited control on managers, expatriates may not have adequate abilities in managing local idiosyncrasy.

Details

Managing Multinationals in a Knowledge Economy: Economics, Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-050-0

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

José Paulo Esperança, Manuela Magalhães Hill and Ana Cláudia Valente

The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between entry mode and human resource management in the context of small, emerging, multinationals.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyze the relationship between entry mode and human resource management in the context of small, emerging, multinationals.

Design/methodology/approach

This study surveyed international personnel from Portuguese firms actively present in the Spanish market through different modes, ranging from exporting to direct investment. Usable data on 208 relevant employees from 28 firms was obtained.

Findings

Firms selecting weak entry modes tended to prefer country‐specific competences, such as knowledge of foreign languages and capacity to adapt, as well as younger personnel. By contrast, preference for stronger entry modes was significantly related to firm‐specific knowledge and higher management skills.

Practical implications

Successful expansion into foreign markets depends on the crucial role played by human resources. This study underscores the importance of hiring and training competent international personnel whose skills fit the selected entry modes. This may be even more important for firms that are younger, smaller and less experienced with foreign markets.

Originality/value

This study extends previous knowledge of the relationship between human resource requirements and the entry modes used by multinational enterprises (MNEs) when they enter foreign markets.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 January 2020

Monica Zaharie, József Poór, Patricia Ratiu and Codruta Osoian

Multinational companies (MNCs) expect the highest return from their locally dispersed units, and thus the factors that impact the success of the subsidiaries have been of…

Abstract

Purpose

Multinational companies (MNCs) expect the highest return from their locally dispersed units, and thus the factors that impact the success of the subsidiaries have been of great interest to the literature. Building on the resource-based view, this paper aims to explore the effects of a set of contextual resources, in particular, the international staffing (expatriate and inpatriate assignments) and human capital resources on the performance of foreign-owned subsidiaries in Central and Eastern European (CEE) countries.

Design/methodology/approach

By means of a survey applied on 295 MNC subsidiaries from five CEE countries (Hungary, Romania, Poland, Serbia and the Czech Republic), the paper reveals the main relationships between contextual subsidiary level resources (the in-coming and out-going international assignments, human capital resources at both employee and management level and the human resource knowledge transfer) and the subsidiary performance.

Findings

This paper brings empirical support for the positive relationship between the MNCs’ contextual resources, in particular, the inpatriate assignments, the human capital resources and the performance of the locally dispersed subsidiaries. The findings show an interaction effect between the inpatriate and the expatriate assignments on the performance of the subsidiaries. The empirical results bring an insight into the understanding of the added value that the out-going inpatriate assignments and the human capital resources have for the global businesses.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is empirical in nature and calls for further exploration of the topic on larger random MNC samples. The findings of this paper have the potential to improve how the management of the global businesses leverages the inpatriate assignments and human capital resources, thus leading to more value-added to stakeholders.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper stems from the implementation of the empirical survey in the dynamic but under-researched context of the CEE region. Thus, the findings reveal valuable input about the contribution of the human capital resources at the subsidiary level for the performance of the locally dispersed MNC units in five European developing countries.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Miao Zhang

The diffusion of “best management practice” across national boundaries is becoming a significant strategy for multinational companies (MNCs) to achieve competitive…

9362

Abstract

The diffusion of “best management practice” across national boundaries is becoming a significant strategy for multinational companies (MNCs) to achieve competitive advantage in global markets. Several studies have shown that national cultural and institutional differences may constrain or limit the transfer of such “best practice”. However, these conclusions are based on studies of MNCs from developed countries and we know little about MNCs from developing countries in relation to human resource management best practice. China is engaging in rapid economic development and internationalisation of its business system, and Chinese MNCs see the adoption of advanced management practices as central to the process. Drawing on a study of Chinese MNCs operating in the UK, the article shows how the subsidiaries of these MNCs used the advanced environment of a developed country to transfer best practice of HRM into their organisations.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 March 2020

József Poór, Allen D. Engle, Ildikó Éva Kovács, Michael J. Morley, Kinga Kerekes, Agnes Slavic, Nemanja Berber, Timea Juhász, Monica Zaharie, Katerina Legnerova, Zuzana Dvorakova, Marzena Stor, Adam Suchodolski, Zoltán Buzády and Ainur Abdrazakova

We explore the effects of three organizational variables (country of origin of the multinational company (MNC), the timing of entry into the European Union and the mode of…

Abstract

Purpose

We explore the effects of three organizational variables (country of origin of the multinational company (MNC), the timing of entry into the European Union and the mode of establishment of the MNC subsidiary unit) on the human resource management (HRM) practices being pursued by subsidiaries of large MNCs operating in selected countries in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) and the Former Soviet Union. Furthermore, we examine whether the degree of autonomy afforded to the subsidiary over its preferred HR recipes is related to overall local unit performance.

Design/methodology/approach

We profile the HRM practices of 379 foreign owned subsidiaries located in Bulgaria, Croatia, The Czech Republic, Kazakhstan, Poland, Hungary, Russia, Romania, Serbia and Slovakia. Using descriptive statistics, we present the general characteristics of the sample and we then use bivariate statistical analysis to test our hypotheses relating to the impact of different organizational factors on the HR practice mix implemented in the MNC subsidiaries covered in our survey.

Findings

We find a significant correlation between the annual training budget, the importance of knowledge flow from headquarters (HQs) to the subsidiary and the perceived criticality of training and development and whether the subsidiary is a greenfield site or an acquisition. A correlation was also found between the national timing of EU membership (older members, newer and then candidate countries and non-EU members) and three HR practice variables: the use of expatriates, external service providers and employee relations practices.

Research limitations/implications

Our research calls attention to the issue of balancing the efficiencies of standardization with the local preferences and traditions of customization which results in more successful MNC control and ultimately higher levels of performance. It also calls attention to the challenges in pursuing research of this nature over time in the CEE region, especially given the dynamic nature of the MNC mix in each of the countries.

Practical implications

Our findings serve to reduce the information gap on foreign-owned companies in CEE and the Former Soviet Union.

Originality/value

Despite some 30 years of transition, there remains a paucity of empirical research on the HR practices of MNCs across a number of countries in the CEE region. For a decade and a half, the CEEIRT group[1] has been systematically gathering empirical evidence. The combination of the breadth (10 countries) and depth (numerous items related to MNC subsidiary relationships with corporate HQs and patterns of HR practices and roles) characterizing the ongoing research effort of the CEEIRT collaboration serves as a mechanism for augmenting the empirical base on HRM in the region.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 July 2009

Demetris Vrontis, Alkis Thrassou and Iasonas Lamprianou

The purpose of this paper is to position multinational companies on a linear continuum indicating their overall attitude towards standardisation/adaptation, examines the…

44629

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to position multinational companies on a linear continuum indicating their overall attitude towards standardisation/adaptation, examines the reasons influencing multinational companies' tactical (7Ps – marketing mix) behaviour towards it, and finally presents the underlying managerial implications of the results.

Design/methodology/approach

A rating scale Rasch model is used in order to place the multinational companies' attitude towards standardisation and adaptation on a linear continuum. Structural equation modelling is subsequently used in order to investigate the relationship between the adaptation and standardisation variable against other variables. An extensive literature review is also undertaken to provide the theoretical foundation.

Findings

The paper corroborates the findings of past research by placing multinational companies on a linear continuum; by identifying their overall attitude towards adaptation/standardization; and by describing the relationship between AdaptStand and other variables. Furthermore, it categorises the reasons pulling towards adaptation or standardisation into “significant” and “peripheral”; and provides valuable insights towards practical application.

Practical implications

The paper provides marketing researchers and practitioners with an overview of the main factors that influence marketing tactical behaviour in international markets. Additionally, the research transcends descriptive analysis to identify vital behavioural issues and to prescribe marketing approaches regarding internationalisation.

Originality/value

Though the subject of “adaptation versus standardisation” has been extensively researched, this paper provides original work through in‐depth quantitative analysis of a sufficient sample of multinational companies. The paper reaches specific and explicit conclusions that scientifically test existing theory on the subject, categorise factors according to their significance in the adaptation/standardisation decision process and offer valuable prescriptions of marketing tactics based on the findings.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 26 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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