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1 – 10 of over 16000
Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Cathy Bailey, Julie Doyle, Susan Squires, Cliodhna ni Scanaill, Chie Wei Fan, Cormac Sheehan, Clodagh Cunningham and Ben Dromey

This paper seeks to discuss the authors' experiences of multidisciplinary practice in relation to developing home‐based assisted living technologies.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to discuss the authors' experiences of multidisciplinary practice in relation to developing home‐based assisted living technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on almost three years' experience of working within an ongoing, large, multi‐sited and multidisciplinary Irish national research programme: the Technology for Independent Living Centre. This involved industry and academic partners. Teams of clinicians, physical and social scientists, technologists, engineers, designers and ethnographers worked with older adults to design, test and deliver, home‐based technologies that focus on mitigating falls, keeping socially connected and maintaining or improving cognitive function. The authors' experiences and challenges are organised and presented through their retrospective team building model: ENDEA and through comparison with team building literature.

Findings

Learning outcomes and implications for technology focused multidisciplinary practice are offered. The paper concludes that a vital step in developing successful assisted living technologies with and for older adults is to spend resources on building effective, creative and committed multidisciplinary teams and practices.

Originality/value

The model, ENDEA, is proposed which is a blueprint for successful outcomes, through the management and delivery of multidisciplinary research.

Details

Journal of Assistive Technologies, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-9450

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2019

Silvia Mazzetto

The purpose of this paper is to present a practical approach to the teaching of project management as it was applied in the Department of Architecture and Urban Planning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a practical approach to the teaching of project management as it was applied in the Department of Architecture and Urban Planning and the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the College of Engineering, Qatar University. The leadership skills of the project managers, leading several working groups, were evaluated by running a multidisciplinary collaborative project.

Design/methodology/approach

The main aim of the research was to propose a practical approach for assessing the extent to which the knowledge and skills of a leader are important for ensuring that a project is completed successfully. The research exercise highlighted the fact that some of the leadership attitudes of the project manager are fundamental to the success of the work. The project manager’s ability to lead a team through the different work stages of a project is seen as a fundamental contributor to its success.

Findings

This practical approach to the appraisal of leadership brings the theoretical teaching of project management closer to its practical applications, by encouraging students to learn the techniques and tools commonly used in the professional setting. The paper concludes by suggesting that there is a need to focus more attentively on assessing leadership skills when selecting a project manager, in either an academic or a professional context.

Originality/value

The research exercise highlighted the fact that some of the leadership attitudes of the project manager are fundamental to the success of the work. The project manager’s ability to lead a team through the different work stages of a project is seen as a fundamental contributor to its success.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2007

Helen Buckley, Sadhbh Whelan, Cliona Murphy and Jan Horwath

This article reports on the evaluation of a pilot project which tested the utility of a framework for the Assessment of Vulnerable Children and their Families in five…

Abstract

This article reports on the evaluation of a pilot project which tested the utility of a framework for the Assessment of Vulnerable Children and their Families in five health board (local authority) areas in the Republic of Ireland. The framework had been developed following a consultancy process with practitioners and managers from a number of disciplines. The evaluation sought to establish whether (1) use of the framework helped to standardise practice across a range of organisational environments, (2) the framework was effective in a range of family situations and circumstances, (3) the process of assessment was transparent, (4) the framework advanced collaboration between disciplines and (5) the materials were user‐friendly. The methods used for evaluation were: semi‐structured interviews, a review of case records, a postal survey of practitioners, an action learning set and consultation with an expert group. Findings indicated that the framework was largely successful in its aims, with weaknesses demonstrated principally in two areas, namely inadequate use of evidence for decision‐making and deficiencies in documented information about children.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 November 2020

Kerrie Sadiq

There are many success stories during Covid-19 of academics providing expertly delivered online learning experiences for tertiary students locally and around the world…

Abstract

Purpose

There are many success stories during Covid-19 of academics providing expertly delivered online learning experiences for tertiary students locally and around the world. This paper aims to consider how success was achieved by academics who are not specifically educated with the knowledge and skills to convert a traditional delivery model into an online format and who conventionally spend years working on single projects before they come to fruition.

Design/methodology/approach

This study provides, as a possible explanation for success, the willingness of academics to embrace a tertiary sector rather than discipline-specific collaborative learning approach to their own informal education in online learning practices through communities of practice. Using learning theory, both analytical and reflective methodologies are adopted through an examination of an example of a successful academic community of practice.

Findings

Engaging with a multidisciplinary community of practice can be highly beneficial for academics not specifically educated with the knowledge and skills to convert a traditional delivery model into an online format. Communities of practice provide more than online educational skills; they foster a sense of togetherness and a safe environment to share concerns and challenges on both a professional and personal level.

Originality/value

The benefits of communities of practice for academics during a period of profound operational disruption have yet to be documented in the literature. Specifically, this study highlights the supportive environment provided by a community of practice by examining the successful large-scale transition from face-to-face learning to an online environment during a pandemic.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 July 2009

Dorothy Sutherland Olsen

The paper aims to gain a better understanding of how different disciplines work together to develop new technologies.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to gain a better understanding of how different disciplines work together to develop new technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs qualitative methods in the form of semi‐structured interviews and observations. A socio‐cultural approach is taken and the concept of the activity system is used to examine emerging practices.

Findings

In the process of creating common practices the community overcomes some of the challenges normally associated with disciplinary diversity. What develops cannot really be described as a convergence of knowledge, more as an intertwining of work practices.

Research limitations/implications

Although only tentative conclusions can be drawn from a single case study, the findings may have implications for the organisation of multidisciplinary tasks.

Originality/value

The paper suggests a conceptualisation of emerging interdisciplinary practice and provides a descriptive account of knowledge creation in a new field within nanosciences and nanotechnologies.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 October 2021

Maria Cadiz Dyball and Ravi Seethamraju

The paper reports on a study that investigated the (potential) impact of client use of blockchain technology on financial statement audits of Australian accounting firms.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper reports on a study that investigated the (potential) impact of client use of blockchain technology on financial statement audits of Australian accounting firms.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were primarily collected from semi-structured interviews with a range of stakeholders including audit partners from first- and second-tier accounting firms in Australia. The interviews focused on the perceived (potential) impact of blockchain on the stages of obtain (retain) engagement, engagement planning, risk assessment, audit evidence and reporting of financial statement audits of clients that use blockchain technology. Perceptions of changes to financial statement audits were interpreted using the logics of professionalism and commercialism.

Findings

Australian accounting firms have either obtained or considered engagements with clients with a cryptocurrency business or that use a blockchain platform although they are a small group. There is a view that blockchain technology is distinctive and therefore poses risks not encountered before in audit engagements. These risks would most likely shift how firms plan, design audit methodologies and execute financial statement audits. The study showed that the logics of professionalism and commercialism are not conflicting but instead complementary. They present both opportunities and challenges for firms to apply and develop audit expertise in an emerging area in audit.

Research limitations/implications

Being an exploratory study, the findings are tentative. A case study of an audit engagement with a cryptocurrency business will add to a nuanced understanding of the challenges posed to financial statement audits by blockchain technology.

Originality/value

This study is novel because of its focus on the impact of an evolving technology on the stages of financial statement audits.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 35 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Keith Hurst, Jackie Ford and Cath Gleeson

After briefly describing self‐managed integrated community teams, the authors explore potential and actual methods of evaluating their structures, processes and outcomes…

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Abstract

After briefly describing self‐managed integrated community teams, the authors explore potential and actual methods of evaluating their structures, processes and outcomes. Primary health care staff in three comparable sites were studied using non‐participant observation, interviews, focus groups and questionnaires. After describing the fieldwork, the authors examine integrated team structures, which are characterised by a large number of barriers that integrated teams face. Processes surrounding different working practices are explored next. Ways of unifying health care professional practice in integrated teams are suggested using evidence from both the literature and fieldwork. Outcomes that emerged after one year of the new teams’ lives are discussed in detail. The difficulty in establishing acceptable outcomes, especially the validity and reliability of outcome measures, is considered. Throughout, the positive and negative aspects of integrated teams emerging from the fieldwork are compared and contrasted with issues in the literature. Finally, recommendations are made to help strengthen integrated teams in the UK.

Details

Journal of Management in Medicine, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-9235

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2005

Patricia H. Thornton, Candace Jones and Kenneth Kury

We contribute to the literature on institutional and organizational change by integrating two related areas of study: the theory and methods of analysis informed by the…

Abstract

We contribute to the literature on institutional and organizational change by integrating two related areas of study: the theory and methods of analysis informed by the research on institutional logics and historical-event sequencing. Institutional logics provide the theory to understand how the content of culture influences organizational change; historical-event sequencing reveals the underlying patterns of cultural transformation. We apply this dual perspective to the cases of institutional stability and change in organizational governance in three industries: accounting, architecture, and higher-education publishing. Research on governance has focused on changes in organizational design between markets, hierarchies, and networks. Missing from this research is an understanding of how institutions at the wider societal level motivate organizations to adopt one of these governance forms over another. We examine how the governance of firms in these industries has been influenced by the institutional logics of the professions, the market, the state, and the corporation by focusing on three mechanisms – institutional entrepreneurs, structural overlap, and historical-event sequencing. Overall, our findings reveal how accounting was influenced by state regulation producing a punctuated equilibrium model, architecture by professional duality producing a cyclical model, and publishing by market rationalization producing an evolutionary model of institutional change in organizational governance.

Details

Transformation in Cultural Industries
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-365-5

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Gill Chalder and Peter Nolan

A survey of the views of members of a forensic mental health team on the post of forensic nurse consultant was carried out by means of a questionnaire. All respondents…

Abstract

A survey of the views of members of a forensic mental health team on the post of forensic nurse consultant was carried out by means of a questionnaire. All respondents were supportive of the development of the post and hoped that the consultant would be the ‘voice’ of nursing, a strong individual with the confidence and competence to challenge traditional interprofessional boundaries and to raise the profile of mental health nurses within the clinical team. Concerns, however, were expressed that the post might have too many facets and that the consultant could become a victim of elevated expectations, unable to meet all the demands. Respondents advised that in order to avoid consultant burnout, the role needs to be clearly defined, to retain a clinical focus and to provide time for continuing professional development. For postholders to be effective, it is essential that they are supported at all levels of the organisations in which they work.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Helen Tucker and Mark Burgis

This paper aims to demonstrate the approach taken in Norfolk, UK, to engage patients and staff to develop and improve services by stimulating improvements in integrated…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate the approach taken in Norfolk, UK, to engage patients and staff to develop and improve services by stimulating improvements in integrated working. The two year programme focused on making specific improvements that patients said they wanted to see by working with staff who volunteered to take part in the programme.

Design/methodology/approach

The “Integrating Care in Norfolk” pilot (ICN) was one of 16 national pilots. GPs from 32 practices worked with local community staff to redesign services to meet “patient pledges”. The impact of changes on patients, staff and services were evaluated locally using questionnaires and by analysing data combined in a performance dashboard. The ICN was subject to both national and local evaluations, which provided a basis for comparison.

Findings

The local evaluation showed that progress had been made towards meeting objectives, including patients and staff satisfaction and reducing unplanned admissions. GPs recorded improvements to joint working, and all staff concerned chose to continue the project beyond the pilot period.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the local evaluation contrasted with those of the national evaluation. The Norfolk study demonstrated the positive impact of integrating care on patients, staff and services. The national study concluded that there were minimal or negative impacts of integrating care, although the study amalgamated all 16 pilots, with very different clients, services and objectives.

Originality/value

The ICN was novel in the way that patients and staff were engaged. Patients were invited to set an agenda for change, and provided a mandate to staff from each organisation to redesign their services. This approach may provide a solution to sustainable integrated working. The ICN was evaluated locally as well as nationally as part of the DH ICP programme, enabling respective findings to be compared and validated.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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