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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Jiang Feng, Daniel I. Prajogo, Kay Chuan Tan and Amrik S. Sohal

The purpose of this paper compares the experience of organizations in Australia and Singapore with respect to the multidimensionality of TQM and its relationship with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper compares the experience of organizations in Australia and Singapore with respect to the multidimensionality of TQM and its relationship with quality performance and innovation performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was initially conducted in Australia and replicated in Singapore using the same questionnaire. We obtained a total of 252 responses, 194 from Australia and 58 from Singapore. The respondents were all middle and senior management who had experience and understandings of their organizations' quality management and innovation activities.

Findings

Results of the survey cross‐validate that TQM practices take place along several dimensions. Relatively more organic dimensions such as leadership and people management are related more to innovation performance, whilst more mechanistic dimensions such as customer focus and process management are significantly related to quality performance.

Research limitations/implications

Relatively small sample size, especially that from Singapore limits the generalisation of the findings.

Practical implications

The paper supports the compatibility of the best practices modelled in both Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award (MBNQA) and Singapore Quality Award (SQA).

Originality/value

The paper presents a comparative analysis on TQM and innovation between the two countries in terms of both descriptive and structural relationships. Specifically, it confirms the construct validity and criterion validity of TQM practices presented in the earlier studies using scientific method.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Philip Hyland

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the reader to the nature of confirmatory bifactor modelling. Confirmatory bifactor modelling is a factor analytic procedure that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the reader to the nature of confirmatory bifactor modelling. Confirmatory bifactor modelling is a factor analytic procedure that allows researchers to model unidimensionality and multidimensionality simultaneously. This method has important applications in the field of criminal psychology.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper begins by introducing the topic of factor analysis and explains how confirmatory bifactor modelling is similar yet distinct to the more familiar factor analytical procedures in the psychological literature.

Findings

Through practical examples this paper explains the value of this analytical technique to researchers in criminal psychology. Examples from the existing criminal psychological literature are used to illustrate the way in which bifactor analysis allows important theoretical questions to be addressed.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the strengths and limitations associated with traditional “restricted” confirmatory bifactor models and introduces the notion of the “unrestricted” bifactor model. The unrestricted bifactor model allows greater flexibility for addressing interesting research questions. The paper concludes by providing the reader with an annotated Mplus syntax file for how to perform confirmatory bifactor modelling.

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2011

Jaakko Aspara, Henrikki Tikkanen, Erik Pöntiskoski and Paavo Järvensivu

Long‐run corporate success requires engagement in two types of innovative activities: exploitation and exploration. However, earlier research has focused on exploration…

Abstract

Purpose

Long‐run corporate success requires engagement in two types of innovative activities: exploitation and exploration. However, earlier research has focused on exploration and exploitation concerning a firm's technologies. The purpose of the present article is to explicitly examine exploration and exploitation related to customers and markets.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is conceptual in nature, based on marketing, strategic management, and organization literatures.

Findings

The article explains the logic of exploration‐exploitation with respect to two market‐related resource classes – the firm's knowledge of markets and customers (market/customer intelligence) and market actors' knowledge of and bonds to the firm (brands/bonds) – as viewed in combination with the resource class of technologies, processes, and products (technologies/processes). The distinction of these three resource classes enables a three‐dimensional conceptualization of the ideal types of a firm's business development projects, which are seen as combinations of exploration and exploitation of resources across the three classes. The article also introduces the notions of multidimensionality of exploration‐exploitation within the resource classes and relativity of resource newness.

Originality/value

The article explicates how firms can orient their exploration and exploitation strategies not only on the technology dimension but also on the dimensions of market/customer intelligence and brands/bonds.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2009

Uri Fidelman

Feynman's claim that a positron is an electron moving backwards in time implies a paradox. The purpose of this paper (Part I of II) is to prevent the contradiction in…

Abstract

Purpose

Feynman's claim that a positron is an electron moving backwards in time implies a paradox. The purpose of this paper (Part I of II) is to prevent the contradiction in physics due to this paradox.

Design/methodology/approach

Both physical considerations and neuropsychological considerations are applied.

Findings

The physical considerations imply that assuming multidimensionality of time prevents Feynman's paradox and additional physical paradoxes. This multidimensionality in explained by neuropsychological considerations.

Practical implications

A suggested method of obtaining unlimited quantity of clean energy based on the principle of annihilating matter and antimatter is presented in Part II.

Originality/value

This theory is entirely new. Its approach is different from that of other approaches to the multidimensionality of time.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 38 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 29 August 2008

Martina G. Gallarza and Irene Gil

This work aims to introduce the usefulness of the concept of value for tourism research both conceptually and empirically. Destination and tourism services can be better…

Abstract

Purpose

This work aims to introduce the usefulness of the concept of value for tourism research both conceptually and empirically. Destination and tourism services can be better understood if analysed through the multidimensionality of value, as the tourist can simultaneously experience several factors: affective and cognitive, social and personal, active and reactive.

Design/methodology/approach

From literature review, Holbrook's conceptual framework (definition and typology) is chosen to investigate the dimensionality of consumer value in a travel‐related context (students' tourism behaviour). An empirical investigation on one of his conceptual axes – the relativistic character of consumer value – is presented.

Findings

Several research questions are proposed regarding the relativity of value, using the t‐test contrast of hypothesis: dimensions of value (efficiency, quality, play, aesthetics and social value) and a measure of overall perceived value are tested as being personal (they vary across people), comparative (with differences among objects) and situational (specific to the context).

Research limitations/implications

The results presented can fully confirm the relativistic character of value dimensions; hence, the value concept is useful for analysing tourism experiences. Nevertheless, the analysis is made interpersonally. Real intrapersonal measurements on these variations with longitudinal studies are recommended for further research. The scope of this work could be broadened by testing additional axes of Holbrook's typology.

Practical implications

Tourism managers should regard the helpfulness of perceived value as a segmentation tool. Because of its multidimensionality, different facets of services value can be enhanced for different consumers, reinforcing in this way the strategic usefulness of value.

Originality/value

Although Holbrook's types of value have been the subject of several conceptual debates there are very few empirical works on it. Any multidimensional approach to value shows the richness and complexity of the value concept, but Holbrook's dimensionality is particularly interesting because it encompasses and interrelates all relevant facets of the tourism experience.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 63 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 2 August 2007

Guus Berkhout, Patrick van der Duin, Dap Hartmann and Roland Ortt

The duration of an innovation process, from new idea to new business, may take many years. This makes it necessary to incorporate a vision of the future. The Cyclic…

Abstract

The duration of an innovation process, from new idea to new business, may take many years. This makes it necessary to incorporate a vision of the future. The Cyclic Innovation Model (CIM) shows that aspects such as multiplicity (looking at multi-fold futures) and multidimensionality (looking at different aspects of the future) should be taken into account. Looking at the different actors involved in CIM, the future should be researched with an open mind (meaning that the transition path to the future should be kept wide open) and different time horizons should be taken into account.

Details

The Cyclic Nature of Innovation: Connecting Hard Sciences with Soft Values
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-433-1

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Book part
Publication date: 7 July 2006

Barbara M. Altman, Elizabeth K. Rasch and Jennifer H. Madans

The multidimensionality of the concept of disability makes the development of questions to measure the concept very complicated. In addition, the purposes of data…

Abstract

The multidimensionality of the concept of disability makes the development of questions to measure the concept very complicated. In addition, the purposes of data collection can require a variety of different dimensions of the concept of disability to meet the variety of data uses. This paper proposes a data matrix for use in focusing the methodologist on the issues related to the multidimensionality of the concept and the variety of data needs when planning surveys. Discussions of the three components of the matrix, purpose, conceptual domains and question characteristics, provides the reader with an understanding of the elements of this tool. Multiple tables provide examples of the possible uses of the matrix.

Details

International Views on Disability Measures: Moving Toward Comparative Measurement
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-394-5

Abstract

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2020

Keita Masuya and Eisuke Yoshida

This study aims to reconceptualize performance evaluation styles and reveal their performance effects.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to reconceptualize performance evaluation styles and reveal their performance effects.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a literature review, this study conceptualizes performance evaluation styles on two dimensions: priority of budgetary targets when setting performance criteria and use of accounting information for ex-post performance evaluation. This study discusses two concepts – budget rigidity and discretionary adjustments – to explain these two dimensions, and their optimal combination is then investigated by considering environmental uncertainty. The empirical analysis uses survey data from Japanese firms.

Findings

The results indicate that suitable combinations of budget rigidity and discretionary adjustments differ depending on environmental uncertainty. As expected, a combination of lower budget rigidity and higher discretionary adjustments is optimal in an uncertain environment. Contrary to expectations, a combination of higher budget rigidity and higher discretionary adjustments is optimal in a stable environment. Moreover, higher discretionary adjustments complement budgetary targets’ motivational effects, regardless of environmental uncertainty.

Originality/value

This study’s theoretical and empirical analysis suggests that it is difficult to understand the performance implications of performance evaluation styles without recognizing their multidimensionality and interdependencies. Moreover, the results demonstrate that discretionary adjustments in budget-based performance evaluations seem to act rationally in practice.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Anders Pehrsson

The purpose of this paper is to extend understanding of business relatedness, a concept that is central to diversification issues. These questions are put forward: What…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend understanding of business relatedness, a concept that is central to diversification issues. These questions are put forward: What characterizes existing types of measurements of business relatedness? What are the weaknesses of these types? What would be the features of a model for measurement of business relatedness?

Design/methodology/approach

As relatedness concerns specific business attributes, common attributes used in measurements are presented. A review of previous studies on types of measurements of business relatedness (codes or indices, researcher assessments and managerial perceptions) is followed by a discussion on correlations between perceptual and objective measurements.

Findings

The review shows that application of standard industrial classification codes/indices and researcher assessments suffer from weak content validity of the measurements, and underestimation of the multidimensionality of the construct. Use of managerial perceptions needs to address the uncertainty inherent in managerial self‐assessments; previous research has found a major divergence between perceptual and objective measurements.

Practical implications

A model is proposed for the measurement of business relatedness using perceptual data. It is stressed that the context of the comparisons (i.e. reason for comparison and units to be compared) has a major influence on the outcomes. Business attributes to be subjectively compared by managers are those that have been singled out as important for financial performance.

Originality/value

The paper is unique as it represents a continuation of the most recent research on measurement of business relatedness, i.e. those measurements that are based on managerial perceptions. Another key value is that the review of research leads to a measurement model.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

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