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Book part

Tine Köhler, Iris Fischlmayr, Timo Lainema and Eeli Saarinen

VIBu – Virtual Teams in International Business – is the name of a training concept, which is aimed at familiarizing participants with collaborating in a virtual…

Abstract

VIBu – Virtual Teams in International Business – is the name of a training concept, which is aimed at familiarizing participants with collaborating in a virtual environment. Based on the online business simulation RealGame™, participants are assigned to multicultural virtual teams that represent different companies. These companies are either competing with or depending on each other in typical business processes of an internationally operating manufacturing company. Interaction and negotiation are required throughout the whole simulation. All communication takes place via information and communication technology, mainly Skype and Skype chat. The main challenge in the environment is that participants are located in different countries and time zones all over the world. The book chapter first outlines some of the challenges of global teamwork that organizations face. We argue that students need to learn how to navigate in global teams before they leave university as they are bound to become involved in organizational global teamwork sooner rather than later. We draw on frameworks for experiential learning (e.g., Kolb's learning model, Kolb, 1984) and the constructivist learning paradigm (Lainema, 2009) to outline the learning experiences that students need to gather in order to become effective global team members. In addition, we highlight the potential for learner engagement that this approach offers. The chapter concludes by highlighting the key learning and teaching outcomes from incorporating this cutting-edge simulation technology. Furthermore, we direct the reader's attention to ways in which the simulation can be used for research purposes, international inter-university collaborations, and multidisciplinary research on teaching practices and engaged learning.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Classroom Technologies: Classroom Response Systems and Mediated Discourse Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-512-8

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Article

Scott Walter

The purpose of this article is to identify opportunities for effective collaboration between academic libraries and student services offices dedicated to providing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to identify opportunities for effective collaboration between academic libraries and student services offices dedicated to providing services to students of color.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey research method was used to gather demographic information about students affiliated with one of four “cultural centers” at Washington State University and to generate descriptive statistics regarding their patterns of information use and the degree to which they made use of library resources and services.

Findings

Findings are reported in five tables describing library use by students of color as well as their preferences for targeted library programming. Survey results were used to identify a number of potential service enhancements to encourage more effective use of library and information resources by students of color.

Research limitations/implications

Survey dissemination was limited to those students either actively affiliated with one of four cultural centers sponsored by the Office of Multicultural Student Services, or involved in the Academic Enrichment programs sponsored by that office. Survey results suggest that additional inquiry is needed into the development of substantive and sustainable partnerships between academic libraries and student services offices dedicated to providing services to students of color.

Practical implications

Provides a number of discrete approaches to providing more effective library resources and services to students of color within the framework both of liaison with academic departments and of co‐curricular service frameworks.

Originality/value

Builds a framework for service‐based liaison with student communities of color that transcends the familiar discussions related to building library collections that reflect the history and experience of racial and ethnic minority groups. Insight into minority student use of libraries and into avenues for collaboration with multicultural student service programs may be useful to librarians on any college campus with a well‐defined framework for minority student services.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part

Sharon Harris-Byrne and Marina Wikman

Partnerships and collaborative projects between universities and colleges in higher education have the potential to increase diversity in education and can prepare…

Abstract

Partnerships and collaborative projects between universities and colleges in higher education have the potential to increase diversity in education and can prepare students for international experiences in the workplace. With this in mind and through the Erasmus plus program, this chapter sets out to discuss the collaborative project between Institute of Technology Carlow, Ireland and Satakunta University of Applied Sciences, Finland, with international business students. The academic objective of the project was for the students to research and compare the marketing of a similar product in both countries. Underpinning this was the objective of providing the students with experience on working online in international teams, and thus preparing them for their career in international business while further engaging them with the module content.

Many challenges were identified during and after the project was complete. There were communication issues and cultural differences identified throughout. From the lecturers viewpoint, there was a need for clear, concise, hands on instruction from start to finish.

These challenges, however, were outweighed by the many benefits to the project. This project offered the students and lecturers with the opportunity to network, learn, gain experience, liaise and collaborate with new cultures. It presented them with a chance to develop their knowledge on international business, culture and communication.

Details

Improving Classroom Engagement and International Development Programs: International Perspectives on Humanizing Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-473-6

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Article

Anastasios A. Economides

In a collaborative learning environment there will be many learners with diverse cultures. These learners should be supported to communicate and collaborate among…

Abstract

Purpose

In a collaborative learning environment there will be many learners with diverse cultures. These learners should be supported to communicate and collaborate among themselves. The variety of the communication and collaboration tools and modes available to each learner would depend on his/her personal cultural background. The purpose of this paper is to suggest the adaptation of the collaborative learning environment to the learner's cultural profile. So, first it aims to present learner's models with respect to his/her cultural characteristics. It also aims to present the various communication and collaboration tools and modes that would be available to the learners. Then, each learner has at his/her disposal the appropriate communication and collaboration tools and modes according to his/her cultural characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

The cultural models of Trompenaars and Hampden‐Turner, as well Hofsted are modified relaxing the dualism of their dimensions. The modified models are used in a collaborative learning environment. The various attributes and types of communication and collaboration among learners and teachers in a collaborative learning environment are also identified.

Findings

This paper presents learner's cultural models across several cultural dimensions. Each cultural dimension weights differently. Also, a learner may not belong strictly to a cultural extreme of a dimension, but he/she may have characteristics from both cultural extremes of each dimension. Based on a learner's cultural profile, different communication and collaboration tools would be available to the learner.

Research limitations/implications

Based on the learner's profile, either the adaptation engine, or the teacher, or the learner him/herself may select the appropriate communication and collaboration tools and modes for the particular learner. Designers, developers and evaluators of collaborative learning systems may benefit from these learners' cultural models and the communication and collaboration attributes. For example, they may create collaborative learning systems with flexible communication and collaboration attributes that provide to each learner personalized communication and collaboration tools according to his cultural profile.

Practical implications

This paper proposes the adaptation of the collaborative learning environment to the cultural characteristics of the learner. Future research may assign the specific communication and collaboration tools to each particular learner's cultural profile.

Originality/value

This paper proposes the adaptation of the communication and collaboration tools and modes that are used by a learner in a collaborative learning environment to the learner's cultural characteristics. First, the paper presents new cultural models of a learner. Then, it presents the communication and collaboration attributes and types that would be used by the learners in a collaborative learning environment. A learner would have at disposal the appropriate personalized communication and collaboration tools.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

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Article

James McShay and Patricia Randolph Leigh

The purpose of this paper is to describe the double infusion (DI) model, which was developed to offer technology and multicultural teacher educators a systematic process…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the double infusion (DI) model, which was developed to offer technology and multicultural teacher educators a systematic process for helping prospective teachers to become proficient in using technology to enhance student learning in K‐12 environments, while they work toward strengthening their own conceptions of critical multicultural education.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reports on the implementation and conceptual analysis of this DI model, which was piloted in a 16‐week graduate level instructional technology course for future educators. Data collected for this analysis included student course projects, a focus group interview with students, and an interview with the course instructor.

Findings

The preliminary findings for this pilot project yielded that the participants had the critical dispositions needed to understand and make meaning of the “doubly infused” content, however, the opportunities they had in their graduate programs to reflect upon how these ways of thinking can be reflected in technology‐based applications were few to non‐existent.

Originality/value

The authors found that the organizational structure of teacher education programs plays a critical role in helping students to envision how technology can be used to support the learning goals of critical multicultural education, and conversely, how critical multicultural education, can be used to support learning within a technology context.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

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Book part

Eija Raatikainen and Aija Ahokas

The aim of this chapter is to describe a five-year long cooperation between seven Higher Education Institutions (Universities of Applied Sciences and Universities) in…

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to describe a five-year long cooperation between seven Higher Education Institutions (Universities of Applied Sciences and Universities) in Europe. The focus of the text is to describe the structure of the Intensive Program (IP) and the pedagogical approach behind it. The aim is to introduce the results of this course. Our question in this chapter is “How can the Intensive Program support students and teachers to develop their mindset of European professional (in their own field) and what kind of pedagogical approaches and teaching methods/pedagogical solutions are needed for it?”

Details

Engaging Dissonance: Developing Mindful Global Citizenship in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-154-4

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Article

Fion Lau and Adam M. Williams

Research on the impact of oneʼs self-perception of voice on their willingness to take part in organizations collaboration has recently been empirically demonstrated…

Abstract

Research on the impact of oneʼs self-perception of voice on their willingness to take part in organizations collaboration has recently been empirically demonstrated. However, in the context of larger, global organizations, research has yet to determine the importance of voice and collaboration. Moreover, the failure to account for influences such as globalization warrants revisiting theoretical explanations of voice and collaboration. This manuscript proposes a new model merging cultural theory and the work on voice and collaboration to describe how global organizations seek to develop a structure and attract personnel that will collaborate to make decisions towards the organizationʼs preferred outcome and ensuing behaviors.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Book part

Nancy Erbe and Rebecca Korinek

This chapter introduces how the teaching of leadership, within negotiation, conflict transformation, and peace building uses adult education strategies. In turn, adult…

Abstract

This chapter introduces how the teaching of leadership, within negotiation, conflict transformation, and peace building uses adult education strategies. In turn, adult education effectively prepares learners, especially those concerned about poverty, and injustice, to be active agents working on behalf of community development. Optimally, the pedagogy of conflict transformation and peace building incorporates the best of both adult and leadership education. The chapter begins with a case study where the ecumenical Services for Peace (SEP) inspired an agricultural cooperative and other response to community need between conflicted communities in Cameroon. SEP did so through using adult education in mediation and peace building strategy that prioritized reflective practice (assessment, monitoring, and evaluation). The chapter then shows how these same and other adult learning activities are used in the authors’ classroom to teach conflict transformation so that students master collaborative skills. As a result, they are potently equipped to act as effective leaders on behalf of social justice concerns.

Details

Collective Efficacy: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on International Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-680-4

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Article

Andreas Novy

The purpose of this self‐reflective paper is to focus on practical efforts to combat inequality and foster intercultural dialogue in education. It introduces “knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this self‐reflective paper is to focus on practical efforts to combat inequality and foster intercultural dialogue in education. It introduces “knowledge alliances”, a type of social practice open for education technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is structured in a theoretical and an empirical part. The theoretical part ledge production is divided in two sections: the first one summarizes transdisciplinarity and Paulo Freire's dialogical pedagogy as two innovative approaches to knowledge sharing, production and appropriation. In the second section knowledge alliances are presented as innovative forms of lasting learning and research partnerships. The empirical part presents a case study and discusses the potential and limits of this specific knowledge alliance.

Findings

The paper demonstrates the importance of a partnership approach to combat inequality and discrimination. Knowledge alliance is a normative as well as an analytical concept to grasp the dynamics of lasting and transdisciplinary cooperation. For multicultural education, their implementation can be supported by learning technologies.

Research limitations/implications

The paper is a self‐reflection on a lasting learning and research cooperation which offers deep insights into practical challenges. The limitations of these socially innovative practices are the lack of ex‐ante scientific rigor.

Practical implications

The paper argues in favour of lasting cooperation.

Social implications

The paper shows the necessity to link practice and theory in knowledge alliances which last beyond the single project.

Originality/value

The paper introduces the term knowledge alliances and the related normative and analytical implications.

Details

Multicultural Education & Technology Journal, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-497X

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Book part

Lena Zander, Christina L. Butler, Audra I. Mockaitis, Kendall Herbert, Jakob Lauring, Kristiina Mäkelä, Minna Paunova, Timurs Umans and Peter Zettinig

We propose team-based organizing as an alternative to more traditional forms of hierarchy-based organizing in global firms.

Abstract

Purpose

We propose team-based organizing as an alternative to more traditional forms of hierarchy-based organizing in global firms.

Methodology/approach

Advancements in the study of global teams, leadership, process, and outcomes were organized into four themes: (1) openness toward linguistic and value diversity as enhancing team creativity and performance, (2) knowledge sharing in team-based organizations, (3) the significance of social capital for global team leader role success, and (4) shared leadership, satisfaction, and performance links in global virtual teams.

Findings

We identify questions at three levels for bringing research on team-based organizing in global organizations forward. At the within-team individual level, we discuss the criticality of process and leadership in teams. At the between-teams group level, we draw attention to that global teams also need to focus on relationships and interactions with other teams within the same global firm, for example, when sharing knowledge. With respect to the across-teams organizational level, we highlight how bringing people together in global teams from different organizational units and cultures creates the potential for experiential individual and team-based learning, while making the firm more flexible and adaptable.

Theoretical implications

The potential of the relatively underexplored idea of global team-based firms as an alternative to hierarchy open up questions for empirical research, and further theorizing about the global firm.

Practical implications

Practitioners can learn about organizational, team, and individual challenges and benefits of global team-based organizing.

Originality/value

A century-old dominant organizational form is challenged when moving away from hierarchy- and hybrid-based forms of organizing toward team-based global organizing of work.

Details

The Future Of Global Organizing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-422-5

Keywords

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