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Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1999

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Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

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Publication date: 1 December 1999

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Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

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Publication date: 1 August 2000

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Microelectronics International, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-5362

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Publication date: 1 August 2000

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Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

G.A. Gravvanis, P.I. Matskanidis, K.M. Giannoutakis and E.A. Lipitakis

The purpose of this paper is to propose novel parallel computational techniques for the parallelization of explicit finite element generalized approximate inverse methods…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose novel parallel computational techniques for the parallelization of explicit finite element generalized approximate inverse methods, based on Portable Operating System Interface for UniX (POSIX) threads, for multicore systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors' main motive for the derivation of the new Parallel Generalized Approximate Inverse Finite Element Matrix algorithmic techniques is that they can be efficiently used in conjunction with explicit preconditioned conjugate gradient‐type schemes on multicore systems. The proposed parallelization technique of the Optimized Banded Generalized Approximate Inverse Finite Element Matrix (OBGAIFEM) algorithm is achieved based on the concept of the “fish bone” approach with the use of a thread pool pattern. Theoretical estimates on the computational complexity of the parallel generalized approximate inverse finite element matrix algorithmic techniques are also derived.

Findings

Application of the proposed method on a two‐dimensional boundary value problem is discussed and numerical results are given on a multicore system using POSIX threads. These results tend to become optimum and are favorably compared to corresponding results from multiprocessor systems, as presented in recent work by Gravvanis et al.

Originality/value

The proposed parallel explicit finite element generalized approximate inverse preconditioning, using approximate factorization and approximate inverse algorithms, is an efficient computational method that is valuable for computer scientists and for scientists and engineers in engineering computations.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Brian N. Ellis

This profile is somewhat more exotic than the usual ones found in this, hopefully, august journal and your reporter would like to dwell on the background more than is…

Abstract

This profile is somewhat more exotic than the usual ones found in this, hopefully, august journal and your reporter would like to dwell on the background more than is usual. If you take your world atlas, you may find Ipoh as an isolated dot in the middle of the Malaysian peninsula, a little to the north‐west of Kuala Lumpur. Viewed thus, why would Multicore Solders choose such an isolated outpost to establish a subsidiary factory? Arriving at the international airport at Kuala Lumpur starts to give one a clue: there are enormous bare scars in the plain. Flying from Kuala Lumpur to Ipoh, these scars multiply. They are the remains of the open‐cast tin mines in the alluvial deposits. Viewed from the air, they are a terrible blot on the landscape. The amazing thing is that they juxtapose oil palm, fruit and rubber plantations and even untouched jungle, but they remain bare and desert for decades. It is evident that no effort has been made to conserve the vegetable soil and replace it after the mining operations are finished, but this may be because the humus layer is so thin that it would be impossible to do so. To the ignorant European that this writer is, I imagined that the jungle was an all‐invading vegetation ready to swallow‐up every square metre of land: not so, it is a very precarious ecosystem where the humus formed by the rotting vegetation is swallowed up by the new growth faster than it can form. The jungle soil is very thin, bare rock being common and such a humus layer may take decades or even centuries to form. Most of the disused tin‐mines are therefore as devoid of life as the starkest desert. It would seem that, after fifty years or so, the first signs of vegetation start to reappear, a very meagre growth which, in time, may develop into scrub or secondary jungle without high trees.

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Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

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Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

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Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Abstract

Details

Soldering & Surface Mount Technology, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-0911

Keywords

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