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1 – 10 of 130
Article
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Honglei Li, Qianqian Hu, Guangzhi Zhao and Bin Li

This study aims to answer the question of how business models (BMs) maintain stability while coping with environmental uncertainties. This study proposes a dynamic…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to answer the question of how business models (BMs) maintain stability while coping with environmental uncertainties. This study proposes a dynamic co-evolution of knowledge management and business model transformation based on a comparative analysis of the focal firms’ BMs and their main partners in two e-commerce ecosystems in China.

Design/methodology/approach

The open data of listed companies regarding the introduction of emerging topics on the transformation tendency of BMs in the post-COVID-19 business world is qualitatively analysed. The theoretical foundation is based on a critical review of the literature.

Findings

Three aspects of the co-evolution between knowledge management and business model transformation are introduced. These three aspects are as follows: knowledge integration helps with multi-system business integration and decision-making collaborations; knowledge sharing helps to enhance cognitive ability and network value based on businesses; and the creation of new knowledge helps enrich the knowledge base and promote the transformation of BMs.

Research limitations/implications

Solely attributing a firm’s ability to cope with environmental uncertainties to its business model weakens the importance of its knowledge management. This study argues that the co-evolution between knowledge management and business model transformation also plays a key role in a firm’s response to issues post-COVID-19.

Originality/value

This study calls for the development of a normative theory of co-evolution between knowledge management and business model transformation, implying uncharted territories of knowledge management based on interaction with business model designs in e-business ecosystems.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Paula Braun, Leo Hörnig and Friso Visser

The purpose of this article is to describe the development and implementation of a new service, (zoek&boek), that provides the Dutch public with a resource that allows…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to describe the development and implementation of a new service, (zoek&boek), that provides the Dutch public with a resource that allows them to search and request items from regional, provincial and national catalogues should their request be unavailable from their local library. The new digital system is able to handle both the logistic and cost considerations involved. By checking holdings and availability of the requested item, a rota is drawn up listing the libraries that can supply the item, whilst also considering the maximum cost a customer is prepared to pay for their request.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive approach is provided.

Findings

The article finds that Zoek&boek will be implemented during 2006 and available for public use from the autumn. A number of issues relevant to establishing a cultural shift in attitudes to resource sharing are discussed and the article looks at the resulting increased efficiency of such a collaborative approach, as well as the hurdles to be overcome in order to achieve the final implementation. In this project, a layered network was established consisting of a national organisation and national, provincial and local players. Key considerations of the initiative were national vs provincial and local requirements, multi‐system integration using standards, resource sharing policies, ease of use for customers, authentication policies, logistical and cost implications, and the requirement for a stable and versatile system.

Originality/value

Of particular importance to public librarians internationally. This service goes well beyond what is available in most countries in giving direct access to regional and national resources for the individual citizen.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 17 October 2012

Suma Damodaran and Uday Damodaran

Business strategy and industrial economics.

Abstract

Subject area

Business strategy and industrial economics.

Study level/applicability

This case may be used early on in a basic course on strategy in an MBA program or in a course in industrial economics. It can also be used in a session of an executive development program on strategy.

Case overview

The TV Broadcasting industry, worldwide, has been moulded by frequent changes in technology and by regulatory interventions. So has been the case of India. The case begins with a general introduction to the technology of TV broadcasting and distribution and then moves on to a discussion of the technological changes in the Indian context. The evolving structure of the industry in India over three distinct periods is then described. The Industry consists of content producers, broadcasters, aggregators, direct-to-home distributors, multi-system operators and local cable operators. Over the three periods of time, changes in technology and regulation constantly impacted on the structure, the conduct and the performance of players in each segment.

Expected learning outcomes

The analysis of the case is expected to demonstrate the use of theoretical frameworks like the structure-conduct-performance model and Porter's five-force model in arriving at a prognosis of the structure of an industry in general, and that of the Indian TV broadcasting industry in particular.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available, please consult your Librarian for access.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 2 no. 8
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 February 2022

Jenny Lunt, Sally Hemming, James Elander, Amy Baraniak, Kim Burton and Destiny Ellington

The prevalence and multi-system nature of post-COVID-19 symptoms warrants clearer understanding of their work ability implications within the working age population. An…

Abstract

Purpose

The prevalence and multi-system nature of post-COVID-19 symptoms warrants clearer understanding of their work ability implications within the working age population. An exploratory survey was undertaken to provide empirical evidence of the work-relevant experiences of workers recovering from COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

A bespoke online survey based on a biopsychosocial framework ran between December 2020 and February 2021. It collected quantitative ratings of work ability and return-to-work status, qualitative responses about return-to-work experiences, obstacles and recommendations, along with views on employer benefits for making accommodations. A sample of 145 UK workers recovering from COVID-19 was recruited via social media, professional networks and industry contacts. Qualitative data was subject to thematic analysis. Participants were mainly from health/social care (50%) and educational settings (14%).

Findings

Just over 90% indicated that they had experienced at least some post-COVID-19 symptoms, notably fatigue and cognitive effects. For 55%, symptoms lasted longer than six months. Only 15% had managed a full return-to-work. Of the 88 who provided workability ratings, just 13 and 18% respectively rated their physical and mental workability as good or very good. Difficulties in resuming work were attributed to symptom unpredictability, their interaction with job demands, managing symptoms and demands in parallel, unhelpful attitudes and expectations. Manager and peer support was reported as variable.

Originality/value

Workplace health management characterised by flexible long-term collaborative return-to-work planning, supported by more COVID-centric absence policies and organisational cultures, appear pivotal for sustaining the return-to-work of the large segments of the global workforce affected by post-COVID-19 symptoms.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 June 2020

Karen Carberry, Jean Gerald Lafleur and Genel Jean-Claude

This chapter explores the impact of delivering culturally community family therapy with strength-based strategies, to transgenerational Black Haitian families living in…

Abstract

This chapter explores the impact of delivering culturally community family therapy with strength-based strategies, to transgenerational Black Haitian families living in Haiti and the Dominican Republic following the 2010 earthquake. A series of workshop intervention over several years, which were co-facilitated by community pastors and leaders provided a cultural-based intervention drawing on Black British and Caribbean culture, Haitian culture, Christian spiritual belief systems, in conjunction with some bi-cultural attachment and systemic methods and techniques. Community feedback through testimonies contributed to evaluation and outcomes in developing new strategies to manage stress, and family conflict and distress, together with developing new strategies in sharing a vision for the future across the community.

Article
Publication date: 22 April 2022

Elizabeth McGhee Hassrick, Guy Weissinger, Catherine VanFossen, Rose Milani, Jonas Ventimiglia, Isaiah Delane-Vir Hoffman, Matthew Wintersteen, Tita Atte, Sherira Fernandes and Guy Diamond

Autistic youth face higher risks for experiencing mental health crises. To develop and test a county-level social network measure of care coordination between police…

Abstract

Purpose

Autistic youth face higher risks for experiencing mental health crises. To develop and test a county-level social network measure of care coordination between police departments and other systems that support autistic youth experiencing suicidal crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

To measure the structure of care coordination for autistic youth experiencing suicidal crisis, the authors created a roster of all police departments and youth servicing organizations in two East Coast counties in the United States. They met or exceeded the whole network recruitment threshold of 70% completion in both counties. From the data, the authors created a directed matrix for each county of all reported connections, which they used to create sociograms and calculate standard network measures, including indegree, outdegree and total degree for each organization in the network. Data management and processing were done using R-programming and ORA.

Findings

Social network findings indicated that about half of all police departments surveyed coordinate care for autistic youth in suicidal crisis. Coordination varied by county, with nonpolice organizations acting as connectors between police and other nonpolice organizations. Two structural configurations were found, including a nonpolice organizational hub structure and a lead police structure. More research is needed to determine how different police integration structures shape care coordination for autistic youth.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the small number of counties included in the study. A larger sample of counties is required for generalizable results.

Practical implications

This article introduces new tools and approaches to assist police in building their capacity to measure and improve their coordination of care with other community systems during crisis situations for youth on the autism spectrum. Network science (e.g. matrix and graph theoretic algebra methods) can be used to measure the configuration of relationships police departments have with complex multi-level healthcare systems.

Social implications

Implications for findings include the consideration of police integration across systems in ways that produce new collaboration possibilities to support autistic youth experiencing suicidal crisis.

Originality/value

While police departments play a critical role in coordinating care for youth in suicidal crisis, little is known if or how police departments collaborate with other systems to provide assistance for autistic youth during a suicidal crisis. Improving care continuity within and between systems could potentially address clinical and structural challenges and reduce risk for autistic youth experiencing a suicidal crisis.

Details

Policing: An International Journal, vol. 45 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Rodolfo Jr. Espada, Armando Apan and Kevin McDougall

The purpose of this paper is to present a novel approach that examines the vulnerability and interdependency of critical infrastructures using the network theory in…

1016

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a novel approach that examines the vulnerability and interdependency of critical infrastructures using the network theory in geographic information system (GIS) setting in combination with literature and government reports. Specifically, the objectives of this study were to generate the network models of critical infrastructure systems (CISs), particularly electricity, roads and sewerage networks; to characterize the CISs’ interdependencies; and to outline the climate adaptation (CA) and flood mitigation measures of CIS.

Design/methodology/approach

An integrated approach was undertaken in assessing the vulnerability and interdependency of critical infrastructures. A single system model and system-of-systems model were operationalized to examine the vulnerability and interdependency of the identified critical infrastructures in GIS environment. Existing CA and flood mitigation measures from government reports were integrated in the above-mentioned findings to better understand and gain focus in the implementation of natural disaster risk reduction (DRR) policies, particularly during the 2010/2011 floods in Queensland, Australia.

Findings

Using the results from the above-mentioned approach, the spatially explicit framework was developed with four key operational dimensions: conceiving the climate risk environment; understanding the critical infrastructures’ common cause and cascade failures; modeling individual infrastructure system and system-of-systems level within GIS setting; and integrating the above-mentioned results with the government reports to increase CA and resilience measures of flood-affected critical infrastructures.

Research limitations/implications

While natural DRR measures include preparation, response and recovery, this study focused on flood mitigation. Temporal analysis and application to other natural disasters were also not considered in the analysis.

Practical implications

By providing this information, government-owned corporations, CISs managers and other concerned stakeholders will allow to identify infrastructure assets that are highly critical, identify vulnerable infrastructures within areas of very high flood risk, examine the interdependency of critical infrastructures and the effects of cascaded failures, identify ways of reducing flood risk and extreme climate events and prioritize DRR measures and CA strategies.

Originality/value

The individualist or “pigeon-hole” approach has been the common method of analyzing infrastructures’ exposure to flood hazards and tends to separately examine the risk for different types of infrastructure (e.g. electricity, water, sewerage, roads and rails and stormwater). This study introduced an integrated approach of analyzing infrastructure risk to damage and cascade failure due to flooding. Aside from introducing the integrated approach, this study operationalized GIS-based vulnerability assessment and interdependency of critical infrastructures which had been unsubstantially considered in the past analytical frameworks. The authors considered this study of high significance, considering that floodplain planning schemes often lack the consideration of critical infrastructure interdependency.

Details

International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-5908

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 March 2019

Amir Gharehgozli, Henk de Vries and Stephan Decrauw

This paper aims to study the function of standardisation in intermodal transport. It identifies where standardisation helps to improve intermodal transport, who is active…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the function of standardisation in intermodal transport. It identifies where standardisation helps to improve intermodal transport, who is active in intermodal transport standardisation, what types of standards are needed and what the decision-making process and implementation of standards should be like to positively influence the performance of intermodal transportation.

Design/methodology/approach

An empirical study is designed to carry out this research project. The empirical study starts with a review of the organisations that are responsible for standardisation and intermodal transport, together with the standards that they have developed, and are developing, so far. It continues with analysing the topics where standardisation helps to improve the performance of intermodal transport. The analysis is based on 12 interviews, followed by desk research, to validate the respondents’ statements.

Findings

The results show that intermodal transportation should be distinguished in continental and maritime transport, which require different standards. In maritime transport, the hardware aspects of the system are highly standardised. However, further standardisation of information exchange offers potential to improve the quality of transport. For continental transport, challenges appear in the heterogeneity of infrastructure and loading units used in Europe. For both systems, openness and consensus are main requirements for the development of successful standards.

Originality/value

Standards facilitate interoperability, quality and safety of intermodal transportation, which leads to better performance. This has drawn little attention in the literature. This study addresses this gap and focuses on Europe.

Details

Maritime Business Review, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-3757

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Hugh Carter Donahue

Profiles broadband communications, wondering whether AOL Time Warner will keep its side of the bargain that promises to provide a universal telephone service, in exchange…

Abstract

Profiles broadband communications, wondering whether AOL Time Warner will keep its side of the bargain that promises to provide a universal telephone service, in exchange for accepting regulations regarding monopoly. Recommends that only by quality of service monitoring can AOL Time Warner be seen to be keeping its side of the bargain. Concludes that quality of service monitoring is a timely approach in the USA with regard to broadband communications systems.

Details

info, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 May 2016

Noemi Sinkovics, Samia Ferdous Hoque and Rudolf R. Sinkovics

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the intended and unintended consequences of compliance and auditing pressures in the Bangladeshi garment industry. To explore…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the intended and unintended consequences of compliance and auditing pressures in the Bangladeshi garment industry. To explore this issue the authors draw on three medium-sized suppliers. The institutional changes that followed the Rana Plaza accident in April 2013 make Bangladesh in general and the garment industry in particular an interesting and suitable research setting for standards compliance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a multiple case study approach. Face-to-face interviews have been conducted with the owners of three Bangladeshi garment manufacturing firms and several workers. Additionally, organisational documents and local newspaper articles had been collected wherever possible.

Findings

The results indicate that the pressure for compliance has led the case companies to prioritise the implementation of measurable standards over the socially grounded needs and priorities of workers. As a consequence certain initiatives instead of adding new social value in fact destroyed previously existing social value. Furthermore, the pressure for compliance created the necessity to find ways to cover the sizable cost of compliance. This prompted firms to pursue process upgrading through technological advancements and increased work pressures on the labour force. These initiatives led to an increased power imbalance and the exclusion of unskilled workers from the job market.

Research limitations/implications

The paper contributes to the understanding of the human rights implications of compliance and auditing pressures and initiatives. Furthermore, in order to further enrich existing knowledge in the critical accounting literature, the study draws on insights from the global value chains (GVC) and international business (IB) literatures.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the understanding of the human rights implications of compliance and auditing pressures and initiatives. Furthermore, in order to further enrich existing knowledge in the critical accounting literature, the study draws on insights from the GVC and IB literatures.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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