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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Lili Mundle, Marianne Beisheim and Lars Berger

This paper aims to analyze the relevance of private meta-governance for multi-stakeholder partnerships. The authors assume that meta-governance, defined as higher level…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to analyze the relevance of private meta-governance for multi-stakeholder partnerships. The authors assume that meta-governance, defined as higher level rules that shall guide partnerships’ governance activities, could build on and institutionalize lessons learned about partnerships’ success conditions and, in doing so, may render partnerships’ work more effective in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

The research paper investigates a case of non-state meta-governance in the standard-setting arena. It explores how actors assess the interaction of the meta-governance efforts of the International Social and Environmental Accreditation and Labelling (ISEAL) Alliance (mainly in the form of their three Codes of Good Practice) and the Alliance for Water Stewardship’s efforts when setting and implementing their International Water Stewardship Standard. For this, a combination of research methods is applied: a literature review for deriving propositions on success conditions; document analysis, participatory observation and semi-structured interviews for gathering empirical evidence on the interaction between meta-governance and the partnership’s work.

Findings

Respondents praise the benefits of ISEAL’s enabling meta-governance measures to strengthen their standard, structures and processes, as well as from ensuring activities, as these also improve their internal governance system while simultaneously providing credibility. In this context, they confirm the relevance of three success factors mentioned in the literature on voluntary standards: an inclusive process, a locally adapted design of the standard and institutionalized compliance management.

Practical implications

Instead of reinventing the wheel with every new multi-stakeholder partnership, meta-governance frameworks should be used to enable partnership staff and members, policymakers and stakeholders to learn from experience.

Originality/value

The authors’ analysis generates unique insights into perceptions of partnerships’ staff and stakeholders regarding lessons learned and private meta-governance. The present study on these actors’ perspectives provides a starting-point for further research on how meta-governance could help institutionalize success factors to scale-up and improve the impact of standard-setting partnerships.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

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Book part
Publication date: 18 August 2014

Mara Gorli, Laura Galuppo, Paolo Pezzana, Giuseppe Scaratti and Abraham B. (Rami) Shani

This chapter focuses on an innovative effort in the Italian context in which a complex web of partnerships was created as the foundation of an alternative model of health…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter focuses on an innovative effort in the Italian context in which a complex web of partnerships was created as the foundation of an alternative model of health care. More specifically, the start-up of a health-care organization – Welfare Italia Servizi (WIS) – is analyzed and discussed with respect to its sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

The process of organizing a sustainable health care is analyzed through the theoretical lenses of multi-stakeholders management and partnership perspectives.

The possibility of developing dense knowledge about the WIS’s case has stemmed from our collaboration with the organization board with regard to a research process intended to monitor the organizational start-up and its sustainability challenges.

Findings

The case provides new insights into the dynamic nature of building multi-stakeholder partnership in a complex environment; the developmental life-cycle challenge of multi-stakeholder partnership, and the meaning of sustainability. The case suggests a tapestry of issues such as how sustainability may be “paradoxical,” dynamic, led by different and sometimes conflicting logics, and changeable over time like a growing tree in an intricate forest.

Originality/value

The case can stimulate learning and discussions both within the community of practitioners and the community of academics with respect to which promising conditions could help address the challenge of starting-up a sustainable organization in the health-care field.

Details

Building Networks and Partnerships
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-886-0

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2019

Nina Kolleck

The purpose of this paper is to address school–NGO interactions by analyzing the power of foundations – a specific type of third sector organization or NGO in education.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address school–NGO interactions by analyzing the power of foundations – a specific type of third sector organization or NGO in education.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected through a quantitative survey, qualitative interviews, official documents, reports and websites. Social network analysis and grounded theory are used to analyze the data with the aim to develop a theoretical approach.

Findings

The study identifies three dimensions, i.e. relational, structural and discursive dimensions of power. Based on the analysis of an illustrative multi-stakeholder initiative, the paper highlights the role of foundations in framing educational settings, concepts and structures of the education system as such.

Practical implications

The three-dimensional power perspective offered in this paper is particularly useful for scholars investigating school–NGO interactions or multi-stakeholder partnerships in education. Furthermore, it is of crucial importance for practitioners, school principals and education administrators dealing with school–NGO interactions given that foundations seem to be increasingly able to draw on new sources of power in these interactions.

Originality/value

While the number and power of the third sector in education continues to rise worldwide, there is wide consensus that NGO power in education has, to date, hardly been researched. This paper contributes to this dearth of research by uncovering foundations’ different sources of power and by developing a theoretical approach for analyzing the power of third-sector organizations in education.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 57 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2011

Rachel L. Finn and David Wright

The purpose of this paper is to discuss whether existing organisations that seek to integrate a range of stakeholders (i.e. senior citizens, industry, academics, public…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss whether existing organisations that seek to integrate a range of stakeholders (i.e. senior citizens, industry, academics, public authorities, civil society organisations and the media) in the field of information and communication technology (ICT) and ageing are adequately meeting the needs of each of these stakeholder groups, and to determine whether a new, or re‐organised, mechanism is needed to better meet the needs of stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors identify, describe, assess and compare the adequacy of various candidate multi‐stakeholder mechanisms in order to improve stakeholder co‐operation.

Findings

The authors' principal finding is that the stakeholder co‐ordination mechanisms discussed in this paper are not adequate to foster e‐inclusion co‐operation, co‐ordination and collaboration among all different types of stakeholders.

Practical implications

This analysis offers direction in how a new organisation, or the expansion of an existing mechanism, could ensure that currently un‐met needs are addressed. The strengths and weaknesses of the stakeholder co‐ordination mechanisms discussed here demonstrate that some organisational types are better for performing certain tasks and for integrating particular types of stakeholder. Thus, a federated, multi‐dimensional organisation offers one possibility for addressing the needs of all different types of stakeholders.

Originality/value

This paper provides an avenue of response to various calls for closer stakeholder collaboration by the European Commission and other stakeholders, in order to improve the quality of life for older persons and to meet European social objectives.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 23 April 2019

Monica Thiel

Abstract

Details

SDG17: Partnerships for the Goals: Strengthening Implementation Through Global Cooperation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-315-9

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Zainal Abidin Sanusi and Hamoon Khelghat‐Doost

The purpose of this paper is to share the experience of Universiti Sains Malaysia in promoting the sustainable development agenda through its leadership role in the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share the experience of Universiti Sains Malaysia in promoting the sustainable development agenda through its leadership role in the Regional Centre of Expertise (RCE) Penang using an “inside‐out approach”.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes the institutional structure, policies and programme within the campus, and activities carried out with the surrounding community to promote sustainable development.

Findings

Being part of the RCE network provides various reciprocal benefits. One, it provides a greater opportunity and an impetus for the university to transform itself into an agent of sustainable development. Two, it serves as an excellent platform for the university‐community partnership programme which brings the two closer together. Three, it improves the university's reputation and allows it to participate in regional and global discussions on sustainability and the sustainable development agenda.

Practical implications

This paper provides an example of establishing and promoting education for sustainable development through university research, teaching and learning as well as community engagement.

Originality/value

The format of the main discussion is offered as a potential model for adoption by others engaged in education for sustainability.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

K.V. Ramani and Dileep Mavalankar

The paper seeks to show that health and socio‐economic developments are so closely intertwined that is impossible to achieve one without the other.

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5185

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to show that health and socio‐economic developments are so closely intertwined that is impossible to achieve one without the other.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper sees that building health systems that are responsive to community needs, particularly for the poor, requires politically difficult and administratively demanding choices. Health is a priority goal in its own right, as well as a central input into economic development and poverty reduction.

Findings

The paper finds that, while the economic development in India has been gaining momentum over the last decade, the health system is at a crossroads today. Even though Government initiatives in public health have recorded some noteworthy successes over time, the Indian health system is ranked 118 among 191 WHO member countries on overall health performance.

Originality/value

This working paper describes the status of the health system, discusses critical areas of management concerns, suggests a few health sector reform measures, and concludes by identifying the roles and responsibilities of various stakeholders for building health systems that are responsive to the community needs, particularly for the poor.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2020

Gabriel Eweje, Aymen Sajjad, Shobod Deba Nath and Kazunori Kobayashi

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the concept of multi-stakeholder partnerships in relation to the United Nations' sustainable development goals and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically examine the concept of multi-stakeholder partnerships in relation to the United Nations' sustainable development goals and propose a renewed multi-stakeholder partnerships framework that enables the implementation of the sustainable development goals.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper employs an integrative review methodology to assess, critique and synthesize the extant literature on the multi-stakeholder partnerships and sustainable development goals.

Findings

We propose a conceptual framework of multi-stakeholder partnerships to support the sustainable development goals implementation. Thus, this paper contributes to the conceptual understanding of the multi-stakeholder partnerships mechanism that enhances the sustainable development goals implementation.

Research limitations/implications

We propose a conceptual framework of multi-stakeholder partnerships to support the sustainable development goals implementation. Thus, this paper contributes to the conceptual understanding of the multi-stakeholder partnerships mechanism that enhances the sustainable development goals implementation.

Originality/value

We contend that this is one of the few early papers that contributes to the conceptual development of a collaborative multi-stakeholder partnerships paradigm by which such partnerships are formed and institutionalized among multiple interacting sectors to achieve the sustainable development goals.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2018

Urša Golob and Anita Hrast

This chapter examines Slovenia’s failed attempt to develop a national corporate social responsibility (CSR) policy via multi-stakeholder partnership. It also discusses the…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter examines Slovenia’s failed attempt to develop a national corporate social responsibility (CSR) policy via multi-stakeholder partnership. It also discusses the potential reasons for this failure.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is grounded in the idea of CSR as a ‘politicised’ concept, acknowledging the importance of the institutional setting and institutional support in diffusing CSR. This empirical research is based on a descriptive case study approach and a qualitative thematic analysis of the data. The data sources are IRDO institute documents, the minutes of the Partnership for National CSR Strategy provided by the Network for Social Responsibility of Slovenia and semi-structured interviews with various actors such as government and local representatives, non-governmental organisations (NGOs), companies and journalists.

Findings

Although the multi-stakeholder Partnership for National CSR Strategy, which was initiated by NGOs and other stakeholders, existed from 2011 to 2013, it later fell apart due to various factors, the most important being a complete lack of support on the governmental side, with the government being the actor with the executive power to implement and promote CSR policies at the national level.

Social implications

The chapter provides an insight into the drawbacks of attempting to set a national CSR policy agenda and discusses the reasons for these drawbacks.

Originality/value

This chapter discusses the importance of the economic, political, and social context in which multi-stakeholder networks can foster the national CSR debate. It recognises the role of CSR in co-regulating public policies and the importance of strong engagement among relevant stakeholders and public authorities.

Details

The Critical State of Corporate Social Responsibility in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-149-6

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

David Wright

This purpose of this paper is to identify principal stakeholders and needs in e‐inclusion, with particular reference to senior citizens, determining to what extent those…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to identify principal stakeholders and needs in e‐inclusion, with particular reference to senior citizens, determining to what extent those needs are being met or could be met by other stakeholders. It considers inclusive stakeholder organisational structures that could address unmet needs.

Design/methodology/approach

Although the European Commission (EC), Member States, local authorities, industry, and researchers have called for greater collaboration and partnerships among stakeholders to overcome the so‐called digital divides, little attention has been giv]en to the form of collaboration. Reviewing various policy‐oriented documents, this paper compiles a list of principal stakeholders and their e‐inclusion needs, reviews existing multi‐stakeholder undertakings and partnership structures as candidates for addressing needs not already met.

Findings

Many important e‐inclusion needs are not addressed by any multi‐stakeholder undertaking. Some structured collaboration or partnership should address those needs. A new structure should not merely represent all interested stakeholders, but involve them in decision‐making processes.

Research limitations/implications

This is a conceptual paper, constrained by length from producing a detailed list of needs. Similarly, although the paper identifies 12 different stakeholder categories, some could be further segmented.

Practical implications

Further research and analysis could be undertaken sourcing each identified need, perhaps adding others and further segmenting stakeholder categories.

Originality/value

The paper is of value to stakeholders involved or interested in e‐inclusion efforts. It uses a novel, straight‐forward, approach for identifying stakeholders and needs, who can meet those needs and who is addressing those needs.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

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