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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

John Simmons and Ian Lovegrove

To demonstrate that stakeholder analysis has a significant contribution to make as a “middle ground” research method and as a means of organisational change.

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7389

Abstract

Purpose

To demonstrate that stakeholder analysis has a significant contribution to make as a “middle ground” research method and as a means of organisational change.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of performance appraisal in UK academic institutions uses stakeholder analysis to address issues of organisation performance and development in a way that bridges the divide between theory and practice. This approach is supported by locating stakeholder theory within modes of organisation enquiry, and by positioning it more specifically within its conceptual domain.

Findings

Demonstrates the integrity and value of stakeholder analysis as a “middle ground” research method via development of a stakeholder systems model that identifies design, operation and evaluation stages of the performance management process and links these to measures of effectiveness and equity.

Research limitations/implications

“Joined up thinking” in organisation analysis implies incorporation of quantitative and qualitative research methods in a holistic method of organisation enquiry. Stakeholder analysis illustrates how different research philosophies and methods can be combined in a pragmatic but robust way.

Practical implications

The stakeholder systems model builds on the concept of multi‐source approaches to performance appraisal. Both broaden the basis of assessment by incorporating stakeholder perspectives but, while the former seeks stakeholder consensus at the evaluation stage, the later incorporates multi‐source (stakeholder) perspectives on design, process and evaluation stages and on the system as a whole.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates how stakeholder theory can draw from the conceptual clarity and intellectual rigour of “objective” epistemologies while retaining acceptance of the “soft”, unstructured and value‐based nature of organisation problems.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Armelle Brun, Geoffray Bonnin, Sylvain Castagnos, Azim Roussanaly and Anne Boyer

The purpose of this paper is to present the METAL project, a French open learning analytics (LA) project for secondary school, that aims at improving the quality of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the METAL project, a French open learning analytics (LA) project for secondary school, that aims at improving the quality of teaching. The originality of METAL is that it relies on research through exploratory activities and focuses on all the aspects of a learning analytics environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This work introduces the different concerns of the project: collection and storage of multi-source data owned by a variety of stakeholders, selection and promotion of standards, design of an open-source LRS, conception of dashboards with their final users, trust, usability, design of explainable multi-source data-mining algorithms.

Findings

All the dimensions of METAL are presented, as well as the way they are approached: data sources, data storage, through the implementation of an LRS, design of dashboards for secondary school, based on co-design sessions data mining algorithms and experiments, in line with privacy and ethics concerns.

Originality/value

The issue of a global dissemination of LA at an institution level or at a broader level such as a territory or a study level is still a hot topic in the literature, and is one of the focus and originality of this paper, associated with the large spectrum of different concerns.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 36 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2021

Hongming Gao, Hongwei Liu, Haiying Ma, Cunjun Ye and Mingjun Zhan

A good decision support system for credit scoring enables telecom operators to measure the subscribers' creditworthiness in a fine-grained manner. This paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

A good decision support system for credit scoring enables telecom operators to measure the subscribers' creditworthiness in a fine-grained manner. This paper aims to propose a robust credit scoring system by leveraging latent information embedded in the telecom subscriber relation network based on multi-source data sources, including telecom inner data, online app usage, and offline consumption footprint.

Design/methodology/approach

Rooting from network science, the relation network model and singular value decomposition are integrated to infer different subscriber subgroups. Employing the results of network inference, the paper proposed a network-aware credit scoring system to predict the continuous credit scores by implementing several state-of-art techniques, i.e. multivariate linear regression, random forest regression, support vector regression, multilayer perceptron, and a deep learning algorithm. The authors use a data set consisting of 926 users of a Chinese major telecom operator within one month of 2018 to verify the proposed approach.

Findings

The distribution of telecom subscriber relation network follows a power-law function instead of the Gaussian function previously thought. This network-aware inference divides the subscriber population into a connected subgroup and a discrete subgroup. Besides, the findings demonstrate that the network-aware decision support system achieves better and more accurate prediction performance. In particular, the results show that our approach considering stochastic equivalence reveals that the forecasting error of the connected-subgroup model is significantly reduced by 7.89–25.64% as compared to the benchmark. Deep learning performs the best which might indicate that a non-linear relationship exists between telecom subscribers' credit scores and their multi-channel behaviours.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the existing literature on business intelligence analytics and continuous credit scoring by incorporating latent information of the relation network and external information from multi-source data (e.g. online app usage and offline consumption footprint). Also, the authors have proposed a power-law distribution-based network-aware decision support system to reinforce the prediction performance of individual telecom subscribers' credit scoring for the telecom marketing domain.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 29 April 2014

Mark H. Blitz, Jason Salisbury and Carolyn Kelley

The Comprehensive Assessment of Leadership for Learning (CALL) is an online task-based assessment of distributed instructional leadership. In developing CALL, researchers…

Abstract

Purpose

The Comprehensive Assessment of Leadership for Learning (CALL) is an online task-based assessment of distributed instructional leadership. In developing CALL, researchers faced the challenge of structuring survey items that would measure leadership practice rather than individual traits. Critical in this work was developing items that accurately reflected current leadership practice. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to pilot the CALL instrument and conducted cognitive validity testing on the instrument.

Design/methodology/approach

CALL researchers piloted the survey in six schools in Wisconsin in order to test and refine the survey instrument. Researchers conducted cognitive walk-through interviews with five participants from each school: principals, associate principals, teachers, department chairs, guidance counselors, and activities directors. The interviews focussed on specific items in order to observe the users’ thought processes and rationale in choosing a response for each item. The researchers focussed on relevancy, clarity, and accuracy of survey items in collecting and analyzing the resulting data.

Findings

Three specific survey items were identified that exemplify these challenges and opportunities such as: accessible language, extended leadership, socially desirable responding, 360-degree perspectives, applying appropriate terminology, and identifying appropriate practices. These findings provided insight into survey development work and implications of distributed leadership. The authors discuss the challenges of creating a task-based leadership assessment.

Originality/value

Developing a formative assessment of school leadership is valuable in supporting school leaders’ work. The process of utilizing a qualitative approach to develop a quantitative instrument has proven critical in measuring task-based distributed leadership.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 52 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2017

Gil Bozer, Leon Levin and Joseph C. Santora

Despite the extensive breadth of research into the critical challenge of succession in family business, generational succession in family business has been investigated…

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8424

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the extensive breadth of research into the critical challenge of succession in family business, generational succession in family business has been investigated from predominately one-dimensional perspective. The purpose of this paper is to respond to call for a multi-perspectives examination of leadership succession in order to embrace the dynamic and complex nature of succession in a family business. Accordingly, the authors investigated the key personal and professional factors associated with effective family-business succession across four key stakeholders: incumbent, successor, family, and nonfamily members.

Design/methodology/approach

The explanatory research design included 16 interviews in Phase 1 and 41 prospective case study interviews in Phase 2, both with Australian family businesses that had or were about to experience generational transition.

Findings

Incumbents and successor interview findings support the benefits of maintaining a cohesive family business, adaptable family culture, and familiness for effective succession. The authors also identified several personal components (e.g. family-business socialization and external experiences) that can help determine the commitment of successors and how this commitment can change once they assume a leadership position. Business size was the professional component supported by incumbent, successor, and nonfamily members as having a significant impact on succession process. As family business grows and becomes more highly complex, a clearly defined set of procedures become imperative.

Practical implications

Family-business practitioners can apply the findings to manage the processes and expectations of family and the business to achieve effective generational succession and thereby increase the sustainability of the business.

Originality/value

This research provides a coherent and comprehensive understanding of the interdependencies of competing priorities in the complex succession process that is essential for family-business sustainability and performance.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Judy P. Strauss

To examine the relationship between self‐esteem and job performance using others' perceptions of self‐esteem and to examine agreement in ratings of self‐esteem across sources.

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4618

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the relationship between self‐esteem and job performance using others' perceptions of self‐esteem and to examine agreement in ratings of self‐esteem across sources.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 143 sales representatives, 113 supervisors, 420 peers, 435 customers, and 510 family and friends completed Rosenberg's measure of self‐esteem and a measure of acquaintanceship. Peers and supervisors rated the subjects' job performance. Correlations and hierarchical regression were used to explore the relationships.

Findings

Customer, peer, and supervisor perceptions of subjects' self‐esteem related significantly to peer and supervisor performance ratings, whereas self and family/friends perceptions did not. There was limited support for the acquaintanceship effect (greater agreement across sources when familiarity is greater), while context affected agreement (same context sources had greater agreement).

Practical implications

The study highlights the importance of looking at an employee from a variety of perspectives. Also, training employees to develop self‐enhancing behaviors may enhance their outcomes. Finally, training raters that their perceptions of co‐workers' self‐esteem may influence evaluations of performance could reduce unconscious errors.

Originality/value

If this had been a traditional study measuring self‐esteem's impact on performance ratings, no significant relationships could have been reported since individuals' perceptions of their own self‐esteem were not valid predictors of performance ratings. It may be the individual's public self‐esteem (e.g. impression management skills) that influences performance ratings. In particular, workplace sources perceived high self‐esteem as being important to job performance. The validity of self‐esteem may be understated through reliance on the self‐report method alone.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2009

Timothy Bond Baker

The purpose of this study is to examine and extend Noer's theoretical model of the new employment relationship.

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4011

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine and extend Noer's theoretical model of the new employment relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study methodology is used to scrutinise the model. The results of a literature‐based survey on the elements underpinning the five values in the model are analysed from dual perspectives of individual and organization using a multi‐source assessment instrument. A schema is developed to guide and inform a series of focus group discussions from an analysis of the survey data. Using content analysis, the transcripts from the focus group discussions are evaluated using the model's values and their elements. The transcripts are also reviewed for implicit themes. The case studied is Flight Centre Limited, an Australian‐based international retail travel company.

Findings

Using this approach, some elements of the five values in Noer's model are identified as characteristic of the company's psychological contract. Specifically, to some extent, the model's values of flexible deployment, customer focus, performance focus, project‐based work, and human spirit and work can be applied in this case. A further analysis of the transcripts validates three additional values in the psychological contract literature: commitment; learning and development; and open information. As a result of the findings, Noer's model is extended to eight values.

Research limitations/implications

The study offers a research‐based model of the new employment relationship. Since generalisations from the case study findings cannot be applied directly to other settings, the opportunity to test this model in a variety of contexts is open to other researchers.

Originality/value

In practice, the methodology used is a unique process for benchmarking the psychological contract. The process may be applied in other business settings. By doing so, organization development professionals have a consulting framework for comparing an organization's dominant psychological contract with the extended model presented here.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2010

Effie Lai‐Chong Law and Anh Vu Nguyen‐Ngoc

The rising popularity of social software poses challenges to the design and evaluation of pedagogically sound cross‐cultural online collaborative learning environments…

Abstract

Purpose

The rising popularity of social software poses challenges to the design and evaluation of pedagogically sound cross‐cultural online collaborative learning environments (OCLEs). In the literature of computer‐mediated communications, there exist only a limited number of related empirical studies, indicating that it is still an emergent research area. The purpose of this paper is to describe an OCLE – iCamp Space – which addresses the challenges by integrating three pedagogical concepts – cross‐cultural collaboration, self‐directed learning (SDL) and social networking – with the aim to advance participants' competencies and by mixed‐method approaches to evaluating the complex situations.

Design/methodology/approach

A validation field study involving four European countries was conducted. Groups of students co‐created a questionnaire, which was assessed to provide an indicator of task performance. Multi‐source (surveys, blogs, emails, diaries, chats, videoconference and interviews) and multi‐perspective data (facilitators, students and researchers) were studied with social network analysis, content analysis and conversation analysis.

Findings

Motivation of learners as well as facilitators is the critical success factor for an OCLE; voluntary involvement is recommended. Participants should be provided with basic training on the use of selected social software tools. Other critical success factors include task selection that contributes to participants' sense of ownership and moderately structured setting that offers some guidance whilst leaving room for the development of SDL competence.

Originality/value

The paper enhances a limited, albeit increasing, number of empirical studies deploying social software for educational purposes. It thus contributes to a body of applied knowledge that enables a coherent understanding of this specific research topic to be drawn.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

John Simmons

This paper uses stakeholder theory to critique the morality of managerialism, and advocates “ethical corporate governance” as an alternative philosophy and practice…

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4650

Abstract

This paper uses stakeholder theory to critique the morality of managerialism, and advocates “ethical corporate governance” as an alternative philosophy and practice. Managerialism is seen as morally and commercially inferior to “moral management” in the new era of stakeholder accountable organisations. The alternative philosophy proposed centres on the concept of “the responsible organisation” with a stakeholder systems model of corporate governance offered as the means of operationalising this. The model incorporates organisational justice considerations and measures by which ethical corporate governance can be evaluated.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 42 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 4 January 2016

Karin A. King

An organisation’s management of talent is central to its opportunity to benefit from human capital (HC). Closer examination of the impact of strategic talent management…

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3536

Abstract

Purpose

An organisation’s management of talent is central to its opportunity to benefit from human capital (HC). Closer examination of the impact of strategic talent management (STM) on the psychological contract (PC) and employee organisation relationship of talented employees is imperative if STM is to achieve intended organisational performance outcomes. Conceptualising the talented-employee perception of exchange as the “talent deal” and experience of STM over time as the “talent journey”, an empirical research model is introduced. The paper aims to discuss these issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The model examines employee perceptions of STM, locating the employee response to STM within the wider SHRM-performance linkage.

Findings

The research model theorises the PC of talented employees is modified by talent identification and STM is experienced through a series of significant career events.

Research limitations/implications

Further developing theory within the emerging field of STM, the paper extends STM, SHRM and organisational behaviour literatures by considering the employee’s psychological response to STM. Empirical study considerations are presented.

Practical implications

The “talent deal” and “talent journey” illustrate the employee experience of STM, drawing management attention to the consequences of talent identification including potential risk of altered expectations.

Originality/value

Considering the employee centrally in STM, the model theorises the impact of STM on the talented employee’s PC and their relationship. Introducing the talent deal and talent journey provides a lens to examine the attitudes of talented employees relative to the broader workforce. The model frames future multi-level research of the association between the “Talent Deal” and performance outcomes.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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