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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2009

Ayse Olcay Costello and Thomas G. Costello

To better understand the relationship between the headquarters and subsidiaries of multinational corporations, we introduce and test a theoretical framework that builds on…

Abstract

To better understand the relationship between the headquarters and subsidiaries of multinational corporations, we introduce and test a theoretical framework that builds on and extends the positive agency theoretic corporate governance literature. Results indicate that there are three types of subsidiary bundles of corporate governance mechanisms that are used by multinational corporations. In addition, the following factors can help predict what type of subsidiary bundle a multinational corporation will use to align the interests of its headquarters with a particular subsidiary: the multinational corporation’s international strategy, its subsidiary’s importance, environmental uncertainty faced by its subsidiary, and its subsidiary’s age.

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Phattharatharaporn Singkheeprapha, Zulfiqar Ali Jumani and Sasiwemon Sukhabot

In southeast Asia, international companies are growing to serve customers with multiple faiths. This study aims to focus on Thailand and it is one of Southeast Asia’s…

Abstract

Purpose

In southeast Asia, international companies are growing to serve customers with multiple faiths. This study aims to focus on Thailand and it is one of Southeast Asia’s nations and it has Muslim minority customers. To represent Thai Muslim companies, Thai Muslims are marketing their goods by bearing the tagline “we are Islamic”. Scholars described it as “Islamic brands”. This research describes the significant feature of Islamic brands between Thai Muslim people. It examines, which of the Islamic brand dimensions motivates Thai customers towards buying Islamic brands.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study’s conceptual model was the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and 281 Thai Muslims responded via a standardised survey. The data was collected from four southern Thailand provinces (Narathiwat, Pattani, Satun and Yala) and the statistical application Smart-partial least-squares 3 was used for data analysis.

Findings

The most significant factor motivating Thai Muslims towards purchasing Islamic brands is the customer’s Islamic brand. The second factor was the Islamic brands by compliance and Islamic brands by country of origin.

Research limitations/implications

Three regions in Thailand have been researched, as well as the results concentrate only on three Islamic brand attitudes as independent variables and the development of behavioural expectations of TPB. This research also presents a model that could help understand the consumer perceptions about Islamic brands and established brands amongst various consumers.

Practical implications

The present research applies to small companies and multi-national businesses, as it illuminates and recognises the image of Islamic brands and suggests the preferences of customers in selecting the brand of Islamic brand.

Originality/value

The current study aims to explain Thai Muslim customers’ buying behavioural intentions while purchasing Islamic brands in Thailand.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Anastasia Suhartati Lukito

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of private sector in Indonesia to prevent and combat corruption practices. The eradication of corruption is not only the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of private sector in Indonesia to prevent and combat corruption practices. The eradication of corruption is not only the government’s problem which can be solved only by government regulations. The private sector should be involved in and be aware of these matters because of the huge interest of the business activities concerning national interest as well as their private interest to achieve highest profit.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores the Indonesian laws on corruption eradication and analyzes the important role of the private sector that needs to be built.

Findings

The role of private sector in the financial system can be viewed as a non-penal policy, which has a great impact as a prevention method to combat economic crimes such as corruption. A new perspective is needed to build, balance and integrate the role of the private sector. As a new perspective combating corruption, Indonesian Laws on Corruption Eradication is fostering the role of the private sector in promoting integrity and good corporate governance.

Practical implications

The paper can be a source to explore the eradication of corruption based on Indonesian perspectives.

Originality/value

This paper contributes by encouraging the private sector to prevent corruption and bribery practices, which, nowadays, are common in Indonesia.

Details

Journal of Financial Crime, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-0790

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 September 2017

John T. Crist

Although its contributions to global science date from 1980, Qatar embarked on an ambitious plan in 2009 to position itself as an important hub for global research…

Abstract

Purpose

Although its contributions to global science date from 1980, Qatar embarked on an ambitious plan in 2009 to position itself as an important hub for global research production. This paper assesses Qatar’s contribution over the past three decades to global research output and science productivity in STEM+ fields, as measured by scientific journal article production.

Design

The core of the analysis is based on a specially coded dataset of all peer-reviewed journal articles in the STEM+ disciplines with at least one author whose primary affiliation was a Qatar-based research organization. The original data source is Thomson Reuters’ Science Citation Index Expanded (SCIE). Analyzing trends between 1980 (the first year in which a paper with a Qatar-based author appeared in these selected leading journals) and 2011, the chapter documents how scientific journal article production in Qatar has developed over three decades.

Findings

Between 1980 and 2002, rates of journal article production were relatively low. From 2003, reflecting considerable investments in higher education and research, the annual number of journal article publications increased dramatically. Most publications were authored by university-based scientists (58%) and scientists based at research hospitals or other medical research facilities (30%). By 2011, over 83% of scientific journal articles published with at least one Qatar-based author were the result of collaboration with international partners. European, North American, and Middle Eastern research scientists and organizations were the most common international collaborators.

Originality/value

This is the first comprehensive empirical study of Qatar’s contributions to global scientific production in the STEM+ disciplines.

Details

The Century of Science
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-469-9

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2007

Betty Santangelo, Gary Stein and Margaret Jacobs

The purpose of this article is to explain recent enforcement trends under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA), providing examples of recent cases.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to explain recent enforcement trends under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA), providing examples of recent cases.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes recent trends in FCPA enforcement, including increased enforcement by US authorities, greater vigilance by private industry, and global anti‐corruption efforts. It provides an overview of the FCPA, including the original reason why the Act was passed, its anti‐bribery provisions, the need to show corrupt intent, the interstate commerce requirement, exceptions and affirmative defenses, record‐keeping and control provisions, and penalties. It describes recent FCPA prosecutions and enforcement actions and draws conclusions on how to reduce FCPA risk.

Findings

The FCPA is a Watergate‐era law that was passed in response to disclosures by a number of large US corporations that they had made illicit payments to foreign government officials. The FCPA applies to bribes by any US issuer or domestic concern, paid to any foreign official, foreign political party, official or candidate, or official of a public international organization in order to assist in obtaining, retaining, or directing business. To prosecute, the government must show corrupt intent. The FCPA also contains provisions that require accurate record‐keeping and internal controls of US issuers. Violations of the FCPA are subject to both criminal and civil penalties.

Originality/value

The paper presents a thorough explanation, practical advice, and examples of recent violations and penalties by experienced lawyers specializing in FCPA compliance as well as white‐collar defense, securities regulatory matters, internal investigations, and anti‐money laundering.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 11 June 2014

Abstract

Details

Child Labour in Global Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-780-1

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2018

Progress Choongo, Leo Jasper Paas, Enno Masurel, Elco van Burg and John Lungu

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between entrepreneurs’ personal values and corporate social responsibility (CSR) orientations among small- and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between entrepreneurs’ personal values and corporate social responsibility (CSR) orientations among small- and medium-sized enterprises in a developing country, Zambia.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through questionnaires. Two linear regression models were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Self-transcendence values have a significant positive influence on socially oriented CSR but do not influence environmentally oriented CSR. Self-enhancement values do not affect social and environmental CSR orientations. Conservation values have a marginally positive influence on environmentally oriented CSR but no influence on socially oriented CSR. Finally, openness to change has a significant positive influence on environmentally orientated CSR but no influence on socially oriented CSR.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations of this study relates to the sector from which the sample was drawn, other predictors of CSR orientations, use of cross-sectional data, and the replication of this study to validate its findings.

Practical implications

The findings inform policy-makers, scholars, educators, and regulators on the importance of aligning personal values with environmental and social concerns, thereby influencing entrepreneurs’ CSR orientations for the well-being of society and the natural environment.

Originality/value

This paper shows the influence of personal values on CSR orientations among entrepreneurs in a hardly researched Sub-Saharan Africa country.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Adrian Wilkinson, Malcolm Hill and Paul Gollan

This paper serves as an introduction to this special issue of the journal on the topic of sustainability. It commences with definitions of sustainability, followed by a…

Abstract

This paper serves as an introduction to this special issue of the journal on the topic of sustainability. It commences with definitions of sustainability, followed by a description of the roles played by governments and corporations as developers of standards and legislation, and investors in products and processes, respectively. The paper then goes on to discuss the company capacities required to achieve sustainability, paying particular attention to operations management capabilities and the management of human resources. The discussion of these topics is related to the content of the other papers subsequently presented in this special issue, and the paper concludes with suggestions for further research.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 21 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Leiser Silva and Eugenio Figueroa B.

Proposes a framework for the analysis and the execution of policies aimed at the adoption of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in developing countries…

Abstract

Proposes a framework for the analysis and the execution of policies aimed at the adoption of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in developing countries. This framework is derived from institutional theory that offers, we argue, an alternative for those interested in understanding the forces that influence the adoption of ICTs in developing countries. We use the framework as a lens to tease out meanings of the Chilean case and identify possible courses of action that a country in a similar situation may take to expand and boost the expansion of ICTs. By drawing on the framework, we theorize about why some policies achieve their objectives while some others may not. We conclude by suggesting ways in which the framework can be applied by planners and decision makers in the formulation and evaluation of national ICTs policies.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2011

Robert de Souza, Albert Wee Kwan Tan, Hafidzaturrafeah Othman and Miti Garg

The purpose of this paper is to study the process, network, skills and practices of service parts logistics organizations in the Asia Pacific region. Specifically, it…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the process, network, skills and practices of service parts logistics organizations in the Asia Pacific region. Specifically, it attempts to propose a new framework for service parts logistics management based on interview inputs from several leading automotive and aerospace companies. This paper also seeks to identify the trends and opportunities for service parts logistics in Singapore.

Design/methodology/approach

Companies from aerospace and automotive industries involved in service logistics activities were involved in the study. Data were obtained primarily through interviews with key executives of the company.

Findings

This paper summarizes some of the industry findings on service parts logistics in the Asia Pacific region. To succeed in the service logistics business, companies should not focus on cost factors alone. Instead, companies should adopt the proposed framework and look into other factors.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to companies in the aerospace and automotive industries only.

Practical implications

This framework was drawn from industry inputs and can be easily applied in decision making.

Originality/value

The paper provides a new framework to assist decision makers in deciding where a company should locate its service part logistics hub.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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