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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Tim Sharpe

One of the most significant challenges facing contemporary architectural and urban design is how it can become more sustainable. Energy consumption by housing is a major…

Abstract

One of the most significant challenges facing contemporary architectural and urban design is how it can become more sustainable. Energy consumption by housing is a major source of greenhouse gas emissions and a cause of depletion of non-renewable energy sources. Of particular concern is existing stock, which has the worst performance and is hardest to improve.

One means of addressing these issues that is attracting increasing interest is the integration of embedded renewable energy technologies. This paper discusses the use of wind turbines on buildings as a response to climate change legislation. It examines the potential for embedded generation in a specific built form (existing high rise housing) and places this in the context of a particular geographical location (Glasgow, Scotland) where the existing provision is highly problematic, but which also presents significant potential. It describes findings from two projects in Glasgow, a pilot installation on a city centre multi-storey block, and subsequent feasibility study for a Housing Association managed multi-storey block and identifies the problems and opportunities that may be applied in similar projects elsewhere.

Details

Open House International, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Wa'el Alaghbari, Azizah Salim, Kamariah Dola and Abang Abdullah Abang Ali

Housing costs are very high in Yemen compared with Middle East countries, which caused a shortage of housing supply especially for low‐income groups. This paper aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

Housing costs are very high in Yemen compared with Middle East countries, which caused a shortage of housing supply especially for low‐income groups. This paper aims to develop affordable housing design for people with low income and to examine their ability to afford houses in Sana'a, Yemen.

Design/methodology/approach

Two different questionnaires were used to achieve the study objectives. The first one was to examine the requirements and needs of low‐income groups, while the second was to analyze the feedback of professionals in relevant housing authorities in Sana'a. An affordable house design methodology was used to design alternatives of low‐income housing in order to minimize cost and environmental impact while maximizing the social acceptability in housing projects.

Findings

The results show that the low‐income group can afford new houses in Sana'a in consideration of the following: constructing multi‐storey housing units such as apartment system through using the concrete frame structure and building the internal and external walls with concrete blocks with limited areas (65‐120) square meters.

Originality/value

The findings could be used to improve housing affordability through housing policies in Yemen in order to decrease the housing shortage particularly for the low‐income group.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Nor Rima Muhamad Ariff and Hilary Davies

Homeownership is considered both economically and socially beneficial for homeowners. However, in the collective living arrangement, reaching a consensus with regard to…

Abstract

Purpose

Homeownership is considered both economically and socially beneficial for homeowners. However, in the collective living arrangement, reaching a consensus with regard to the residential environment is difficult. The purpose of this paper is to identify factors that can reduce the conflict among the stakeholders in multi‐owner low‐cost housing in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

This study tested three hypotheses examining whether the demographic and socio‐economic characteristics of owner‐occupants and occupancy rates affect owner‐occupants' satisfaction with stakeholders' relationships. Data were collected through questionnaires from owner‐occupants of multi‐owner low‐cost settlements in Selangor state. Data on housing characteristics were collected from chairpersons of the respective owners' organisations. The data were treated as parametric, and analysis of variance was conducted.

Findings

Four factors – number of children in the family, duration of residency, participation in social activities and participation in meetings – were found to affect owners‐occupants' satisfaction with the stakeholders' relationships. The significant effect of occupancy rates was also indicated.

Practical implications

The Management Corporations (MCs) should encourage social relationships among residents. To avoid conflict, the costs and benefits of participation must be balanced. Policy makers should take two key aspects seriously: owner‐managed strategy practices by the MCs and high rates of tenant‐residents. A mechanism should be identified for assisting the MCs in housing management and for protecting the benefits of homeownership for owner‐occupants.

Originality/value

Past studies on low‐income household settlements examined public housing or low‐income homeowners of single detached dwellings. This study adds to the existing body of knowledge by examining low‐income homeowners in multi‐owner low‐cost settlements.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2019

Elmira Ayşe Gür and Yurdanur Dülgeroğlu Yüksel

Turkey has been rapidly urbanizing since the 1950s. In quantitative and qualitative meanings, the problem of housing is one of the most important subjects on Turkey’s…

Abstract

Purpose

Turkey has been rapidly urbanizing since the 1950s. In quantitative and qualitative meanings, the problem of housing is one of the most important subjects on Turkey’s agenda. Increasing population, rapid cultural and economic transition and the dynamics of in-migration, changes in social life, consumption patterns and value systems have made a significant impact on housing demand and supply. If we try to realize a general analytical outlook to define the basic formal and informal categories that reflect specific values pertaining to housing typology of the twentieth century, it would be possible to make a classification under the following sub-titles: formal housing-row houses, separate houses, apartment blocks, social housing, mass-housing, luxury housing including gated communities; informal housing – squatter settlements/gecekondus, slums; inbetween –apartkondus, unpermitted constructions/building extensions. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Istanbul has been experiencing these various dynamics of planned and unplanned housing settlements in a very radical way, since the 1950s. Changing typology is examined systematically under certain periods up to now. In confronting housing needs under rapid urbanization, “types of housing supply channels” appeared and as a result, urban texture has been changing by periods. In this paper, in order to understand each of these categories and the conditions under which they have been generated, an analysis will be realized to understand the urban housing concept of Istanbul within the twentieth century urban environment.

Findings

The factors playing a role in the evolution of twentieth century dwelling forms on Istanbul will be defined, and the physical/architectural, locational, neighborhood characteristics, as well as their user profile will be examined.

Originality/value

This study is expected to contribute to the further understanding of the urban housing stock and the future trends in housing typology.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2009

Pelin Dursun and Gulsun Saglamer

The relationship between people and their home environment has always been an important research theme. Cooperative works of different disciplines and research areas, such…

Abstract

The relationship between people and their home environment has always been an important research theme. Cooperative works of different disciplines and research areas, such as environmental psychology, social psychology, community psychology, home environment studies, urban planning and architecture have developed an understanding of relationships between quality and residential spaces. In this study an attempt has been made to analyze quality issues in housing environments by providing a general review related to quality housing research and by establishing a model that can be used to evaluate the concept of quality in housing. Focusing on a specific housing settlement as a case study, the goal here is to open a debate based on design concepts and their social and spatial consequences in architecture and to provide important data for future housing projects in Turkey. In the scope of the work, the Belerko Housing Settlement in the City of Trabzon has been selected as a research area. Aim of the study is to develop an understanding of the social, psychological and the physical characteristics that contribute to spatial quality in this specific housing environment.

Details

Open House International, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2015

Katalin K. Theisler

The paper discusses the position of low rise, high density housing in Hungary on a theoretical level, from the conceptional point of view. The purpose is that the…

Abstract

The paper discusses the position of low rise, high density housing in Hungary on a theoretical level, from the conceptional point of view. The purpose is that the dissemination and popularization of the housing type would be beneficial to the society. Before and after World War Two different nature of this housing type was present in the country, but after the regime change in 1989 the continuity has been lost.

This paper aims to support the above assumptions - discussing the benefits of the installaton type in the light of global and local issues, and search of the housing type’s local positions. The actuality of housing issue is relevant because of the planning of 2014-2020 housing program, the fall of yearly built houses, the imbalance of housing allocation and the urgent questions of global problems.

The paper’s method is threefold (1) discusses the potential of the housing type in correlation with the three pillars of sustainability, (2) analyses past examples from three different periods of the past century and (3) searches its position according to actual social changes and suggests strategic objectives for the future use of low rise, high density housing in the country.

Details

Open House International, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2000

Abstract

Details

Property Management, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Antti Tapio Kurvinen and Jaakko Vihola

Even as multi-story apartment building development proposals in existing neighbourhoods represent a substantial component of policy debate at local planning boards, there…

Abstract

Purpose

Even as multi-story apartment building development proposals in existing neighbourhoods represent a substantial component of policy debate at local planning boards, there is limited evidence for the impact of such residential developments on surrounding apartment values. This paper aims to address the void in knowledge, and the impact of multi-story apartment building developments on apartment values in residential high-rise areas located outside city and district centres is investigated in Helsinki Metropolitan Area, Finland.

Design/methodology/approach

Whether a multi-story apartment building development is followed by an increase in housing values depends on both positive and negative externalities. To specify valuation effects of proximate development projects, advanced research design combining matched sample methodology and hedonic-based difference-in-difference approach is used.

Findings

It appears from the analysis that completion of a single multi-story apartment building has an immediate positive impact on apartment values within 300 metre radius, while there is no statistically significant impact on price trend.

Research limitations/implications

This paper studies apartment values only in Helsinki Metropolitan Area, Finland, and it is important to notice that local regulations and market conditions may have a notable impact on the outcomes.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind to provide with statistically significant evidence for positive impacts from multi-story apartment building development in Finnish residential high-rise areas and may have a crucial role in helping to dispel prejudices related to such developments.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Yong Kuan and Yahaya Ahmad

Architecture influences people and the environment from the past, present and the future. Nevertheless architecture and design quality is viewed as subjective, and…

Abstract

Architecture influences people and the environment from the past, present and the future. Nevertheless architecture and design quality is viewed as subjective, and benchmarks to achieve consensus are necessary for design or evaluation of buildings. This paper establishes architectural design criteria for design quality of multi-storey housing buildings. A set of the criteria was established with literature review, an operational definition and survey on qualified persons or architects in the professional practice of architecture. The literature reviews identified seven concepts for architecture and design quality, and the operational definition translated this architectural design quality to measurable and observable cases and variables. The survey collected these variable data from a purposive sample of 95 respondents, and these data were examined by statistical analysis. The results of the descriptive statistics, inferential t-tests (p ≤ 0.05) and positive hypothesis testing verified that respondents in general agreed to these seven design concepts as architectural design criteria for design quality. These results established the first ever set of seven architectural design criteria which were ranked in descending order of significance as function, socio-culture, site context, cost, aesthetic of art, sustainability, and Feng Shui. These architectural design criteria can be applied to the design or evaluation of multi-storey housing buildings for the good of people and the environment.

Details

Open House International, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

John Lindgren and Stephen Emmitt

The purpose of this paper is to identify factors that influence the diffusion of a systemic innovation in the Swedish construction sector. The focus is on high-rise…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify factors that influence the diffusion of a systemic innovation in the Swedish construction sector. The focus is on high-rise multi-storey timber housing; the development of which was enabled by a change in building regulations. This allowed building higher than two stories in timber.

Design/methodology/approach

A longitudinal case study was used with multiple data collection methods to study the development and diffusion of a multi-storey timber house system by a case study organisation.

Findings

The findings contribute to understanding for a number of interacting factors influencing the diffusion of a systemic innovation related to the case study organisation.

Originality/value

The research provides a holistic view of interacting factors influencing the diffusion of a systemic innovation. The results have value to the Swedish construction sector and to the global community of construction researchers, as it provides empirical findings that further increase the understanding for diffusion of systemic innovations in a specific context.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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