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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Herman Eliewaha Mandari, Yee-Lee Chong and Chung-Khain Wye

Generally, this paper aims to develop a model by identifying factors which will assist policy makers in implementing m-government in Tanzania. The paper identifies direct…

Abstract

Purpose

Generally, this paper aims to develop a model by identifying factors which will assist policy makers in implementing m-government in Tanzania. The paper identifies direct and indirect factors which may influence adoption of m-government among the rural farmers in Tanzania.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper conducted a survey by using Drop Off/Pick Up method to collect data from rural farmers. Stratified and multi-stage sampling were used to collect 407 valid responses from rural farmers in Tanzania. Data collected were analyzed by using structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

The results show that government support has direct influence, while awareness has indirect influence through relative advantage, ease of use, compatibility and visibility. Furthermore, relative advantage, compatibility, ease of use, visibility and results demonstrability have direct influence on rural farmers intention to adopt m-government.

Originality/value

This study contributes to knowledge because no study in this area has been conducted in developing countries to examine factors that influence adoption of m-government. Furthermore, this study tests the mediating effects of perceived characteristics of innovation which have not yet been investigated to date.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 19 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Pelin Önder Erol and Elif Gün

A long-established cultural norm of filial piety may cause ambivalent feelings for adult children who are considered the primary caregivers for their elderly parents in…

Abstract

Purpose

A long-established cultural norm of filial piety may cause ambivalent feelings for adult children who are considered the primary caregivers for their elderly parents in Turkish culture, and whose parents have been placed into nursing homes. The purpose of this paper is to provide an insight to the lived experiences of adult children of elderly people living in a nursing home in Turkey.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon dramaturgical theory and phenomenological methodology, the authors conducted interviews with ten adult children whose elderly parents had been admitted to a nursing home in Izmir, Turkey. Multi-stage purposeful random sampling was used as the sampling scheme. Thematic analysis was performed to interpret the data.

Findings

Three themes emerged from the data: adult children’s coping strategies, the ways in which the adult children rationalize their decisions, and the ways in which the adult children manage the placement process. The interviews revealed that the adult children often feel like social outcasts and experience a wide range of difficulties, including social pressures, their own inner dilemmas, and negotiations with their elderly parents.

Originality/value

An exploration for the lived experiences of adult children relating to the nursing home placement of their elderly parents contributes an insight about the well-established cultural norms that produce feelings of ambivalence.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2020

Ande Langga, Andriani Kusumawati and Taher Alhabsji

Investigating the influence of intensive distribution and sales promotion towards customer-based brand equity, repurchase intention and word-of-mouth (WOM) (study on…

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Abstract

Purpose

Investigating the influence of intensive distribution and sales promotion towards customer-based brand equity, repurchase intention and word-of-mouth (WOM) (study on Suzuki car owners in PT Surya Batara Mahkota Wilayah Nusa Tenggara Timur).

Design/methodology/approach

The research was conducted in East Nusa Tenggara (NTT) and the analysis unit was customers of PT. Surya Batara Mahkota NTT (PT SBM NTT) as the owner of the Suzuki car. The population is 1,782 Suzuki car owners who bought their cars from PT SBM NTT, based on data from 2015. The sampling technique is the multi-stage area sampling.

Findings

Incentives distribution had significant and positive influence towards brand equity and repurchase intention. Sales promotion had significant and positive influence towards word-of-mouth (WOM), but it did not have influence towards brand equity. Brand equity had significant influence towards repurchase intention and WOM. On the other hand, repurchase intention did not have influence towards WOM.

Originality/value

The originality of this study was that the researchers did not find a previous study that discussed the relationship between intensive distribution and repurchase intention, between sales promotion and WOM and between customer-based brand equity and WOM. Previous studies used different variables as determinants of positive WOM.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

Edward N. Tetteh and Daniel F. Ofori

Institutional governance has recently attracted significant attention, fuelled by increasing numbers of global high‐profile corporate failures and scandals. In many

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1125

Abstract

Purpose

Institutional governance has recently attracted significant attention, fuelled by increasing numbers of global high‐profile corporate failures and scandals. In many countries issues have been raised about university governance. In Ghana, university governance has become crucial following the upsurge of private universities in recent years arising out of: increased demand for tertiary education resulting from high population growth; and expanded enrolment at basic and secondary levels, which have far exceeded the capacity of existing institutions. This study aims to explore and assess the governance arrangements of private and public universities in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi‐stage sampling technique was used to select three private and two public universities. An exploratory and comparative approach was used to examine the governance arrangements of private and public universities in Ghana.

Findings

Both private and public universities in Ghana follow the “traditional”, “business”, and “trusteeship” models of university governance, although in different proportions. Additionally, both types of institutions follow the bicameral system of decision making.

Research limitations/implications

Only five of 19 universities in Ghana were sampled. Future research might expand the sample size to test and validate the initial perspectives from this study and also investigate differences between governance arrangements of faith based and non‐faith based private universities.

Originality/value

The paper reports the findings of the first nation‐wide investigation into governance arrangements of Ghanaian universities. It will interest policy makers, university authorities, and other stakeholders in the higher educational sector.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Shraboni Patra and Rakesh Kumar Singh

The purpose of this paper is to find out the prevalence and determinants of unmet need with a special focus on religious barrier towards the use of contraception among…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to find out the prevalence and determinants of unmet need with a special focus on religious barrier towards the use of contraception among Muslim women in India. The study also addresses their future intention to use family planning method.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from the latest round of District Level Household and Facility Survey (DLHS-3) in India is used. A multi-stage stratified probability proportion to size sampling design was adopted. The present analysis is based on 70,016 currently married Muslim women across the country.

Findings

The prevalence of total unmet need is the highest in Bihar (48.5 per cent), which is two times higher than the national level (27.6 per cent). About 9 per cent Muslim women in India do not use contraception due to religious opposition. There is considerable gap in the future intention to use family planning method between Muslim (9.2 per cent) and non-Muslim (19.6 per cent) women particularly for limiting birth. The logistic regression analysis shows non-Muslim women are significantly more likely (OR=1.540, p<0.001) to have the intention to use family planning method in the future than Muslim women.

Research limitations/implications

Men are not included to explore the differences in the perception of men and women towards family planning. Interventions targeting men and aiming at overcoming cultural barriers to using family planning method are equally imperative. Couple's knowledge, attitude and perception towards acceptance of family planning methods need to be addressed simultaneously by interviewing the couples separately.

Practical implications

Public-private collaboration to promote family planning programme and providing services in the high prevalence (unmet need) states is required. Support from the religious leaders to overcome the cultural barriers towards the use of family planning is also needed.

Originality/value

This is the first ever effort to address the existing unmet need for family planning among Muslim women in India, which is an important determinant of high fertility among Muslim women.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Article
Publication date: 26 September 2019

Kokou E. Adabe, Abbevi G. Abbey, Irene S. Egyir, John K.M. Kuwornu and Henry Anim-Somuah

Due to rapid urbanization, rice consumption in Togo has also rapidly increased. Most consumers prefer imported rice over domestically produced rice due to the higher…

Abstract

Purpose

Due to rapid urbanization, rice consumption in Togo has also rapidly increased. Most consumers prefer imported rice over domestically produced rice due to the higher quality of the imported rice. The purpose of this paper is to show that it is possible to upgrade the quality of Togo’s domestically produced rice by providing technical and management support in the form of contract farming.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional data were collected using a multi-stage sampling technique. An endogenous switching regression model was used for data analysis.

Findings

The results show that by participating in contract farming, paddy rice quality was upgraded from Grade IV (poor quality) to Grade I (premium quality). The factors influencing this upgrade in the quality of paddy rice grown through contract farming are: the number of extension visits to the farmer, the mode of threshing used by the farmer, and the agro-ecological zone of the farmer.

Research limitations/implications

The data for this study are limited to one country, Togo and this may have implications for generalizing the results for other countries.

Originality/value

This study is original research that contributes to an improved understanding of the impacts of contract farming on the quality of agricultural products produced in developing and emerging economies.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Article
Publication date: 19 February 2019

Falilat Yetunde Olowu, Emmanuel Babatunde Jaiyeoba, Hafeez Idowu Agbabiaka and Olawunmi Johnson Daramola

Rental housing is an important form of accommodation; evaluating its quality will improve the quality of designs, standard living of renters, new dimension to policy…

Abstract

Purpose

Rental housing is an important form of accommodation; evaluating its quality will improve the quality of designs, standard living of renters, new dimension to policy guiding rental housing and enhance the values of rental houses. This study aims to examine the factors influencing rental housing quality in Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

Design/methodology/approach

Multi-stage sampling procedure was used to select tenants for the study. Residential areas were stratified into three densities: high, medium and low. Out of the 18 residential areas identified, six, eight and four were in the high, medium and low densities, respectively. Five residential areas were selected based on high concentrations of rental housing. The selected areas are Mokuro and Iloro (high density), Ife City and Eleyele (medium density) and Aladanla (low density). Systematic sampling technique was used to select 550 buildings where an adult tenant was selected per building for questionnaire administration.

Findings

The results of the principal component analysis established that four factors were generated for the high-density, nine factors for the medium-density and five factors for low-density areas as the major factors influencing rental housing quality. The variation in the number of factors generated and the percentage variance explained by the factors could be associated to the peculiarities across the densities in terms of the socioeconomic characteristics and housing characteristics of the renters.

Originality/value

This study examined the factors influencing housing quality for renters in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. It provides information on the three residential densities in terms of the variation in their housing morphology. The study went further to establish the relationship among the three musketeers such as socioeconomic characteristic of renters, housing characteristics and housing quality, under three dimensions environmental, internal building and external Building. Therefore, the contribution of this study strengthens the position that a minimum standard and schedule of upgrade and maintenance should be meted out for landlords to carry out repairs at interval, so as to make the housing unit and environment habitable for tenants.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 31 January 2020

Munazza Saeed, Fadila Grine and Imran Shafique

This study aims to examine the hijab purchase intention of Muslim women by applying the theory of reasoned action: religious commitment, satisfaction (attitude), dressing…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the hijab purchase intention of Muslim women by applying the theory of reasoned action: religious commitment, satisfaction (attitude), dressing style and knowledge source (subjective norms).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 603 Malay Muslim women in four universities through a self-administered questionnaire using a multi-stage cluster probability sampling technique. Smart PLS was used for data analysis.

Findings

The findings demonstrate that customers’ hijab purchase intention is significantly influenced by religious commitment, satisfaction, dressing style and knowledge source.

Practical implications

This study is for hijab designers because it is important for them to explore and examine the hijab purchase intention of Muslim women and then design the hijab accordingly, not only to capture a big segment in Kuala Lumpur but to obtain a competitive edge as well.

Originality/value

This is the first paper of its kind to examine the hijab purchase intention of Malay Muslim women.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

W. Rees Davis, Bruce D. Johnson, Doris Randolph, Hilary James Liberty and John Eterno

Comparisons between New York Police Department (NYPD) drug‐allegation data and data from users' and sellers' self‐reports about crack, powder cocaine and heroin provided…

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Abstract

Purpose

Comparisons between New York Police Department (NYPD) drug‐allegation data and data from users' and sellers' self‐reports about crack, powder cocaine and heroin provided useful insights about the allocation of police resources via drug‐allegation data.

Design/methodology/approach

Central Harlem was divided into 45 primary sampling units (PSUs) with two years of NYPD data organized in three strata, high, mid or low allegations/capita. In nine randomly selected PSUs (three/stratum), interviewers employed chain referral sampling, steered with a nomination technique.

Findings

NYPD drug‐allegation data concurred more often with self‐report data concerning crack use/sales, but underestimated use/sales of powder cocaine and heroin. Mid‐level PSUs had proportions of crack users/sellers similar to high‐level PSUs. Mid‐ and low‐level PSUs often had high proportions of powder cocaine and heroin users/sellers.

Research limitations/implications

The enumeration of crack users/sellers produced results similar to NYPD data because crack use/sales may be more easily detected and willingly reported by citizens, police informants and police officers. Powder cocaine and heroin use/sellers enumerated were less noted in the NYPD drug allegations.

Originality/value

Provides insights into a question not addressed in previous research – how much and what kinds of drug activity are indicated by NYPD drug‐allegation data.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Book part
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Rabi N. Subudhi

Testing of hypothesis, also known as sample-testing, is a common feature with almost every social and management research. We draw conclusion on population…

Abstract

Testing of hypothesis, also known as sample-testing, is a common feature with almost every social and management research. We draw conclusion on population (characteristics) based on available sample information, following certain statistical principles. This paper will introduce the fundamental concepts with suitable examples, mostly in Indian context. This section is expected to help scholar readers, to learn, how hypothesis tests for differences means (or proportions) take different forms, depending on whether the samples are large or small; and also to appreciate hypothesis-testing techniques, on how it could be used in similar decision-making situations, elsewhere.

Details

Methodological Issues in Management Research: Advances, Challenges, and the Way Ahead
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-973-2

Keywords

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