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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Kamal Sharma and Mukund R. Dixit

This paper aims to discuss key aspects of the longevity of business enterprises across the world. It explores the parameters that set apart a company which had survived…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss key aspects of the longevity of business enterprises across the world. It explores the parameters that set apart a company which had survived for more than 1,400 years from most large companies which survive for a fraction of this time.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper integrates observations from two important research papers on the topic, and from the author’s own research.

Findings

Contrary to expectations, long-surviving firms are usually conservative about change, exploit their opportunities rather than explore more, diversify in relevant areas, and co-operate even with their competitors to live long.

Research limitations/implications

To those companies that live long, age becomes a valuable resource in itself. Consumers see a continuous track record of a firm as a proxy for good quality, and long history can provide managers institutional memory to leverage toward further sustainability. “Long history” not only can provide anecdotes and stories to employees that exemplify the tacit core values of the firm but also, quite counter-intuitively, could be useful in transforming cultures and traditions.

Practical implications

Longevity challenge encompasses both continuity and change, but the experience filtered from many long-lived firms across the globe provides companies with insights that could inspire many more to live long and prosper.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 33 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 7 April 2014

Mukund R. Dixit

This case describes the challenges faced by Amul in organising dairy farmers into a co-operative and creating continuous opportunities for value addition. Participants in…

Abstract

This case describes the challenges faced by Amul in organising dairy farmers into a co-operative and creating continuous opportunities for value addition. Participants in the case discussion are required to review the developments in the organisation and recommend a strategy for the future.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Sunil Sharma, Mukund R. Dixit and Amit Karna

Firms take design leaps when they imitate an established business model developed either by another firm or in another market to create business opportunities. While…

Abstract

Purpose

Firms take design leaps when they imitate an established business model developed either by another firm or in another market to create business opportunities. While recent research has suggested the use of contextual intelligence for imitation, the exact process of adaptation of a business model is not fully understood. The purpose of this paper is to outline the process through which an emerging market firm adapts a developed market business model for creating business opportunities in the local market.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper investigates the journey of Air Deccan, the pioneer low-cost airline in India, from its founding until its successful adaptation of a (Western) business model and eventual failure. The authors use a qualitative case-based approach to study business model adaptation.

Findings

The authors find that adaptation involves the incorporation of following design features: novelty to overcome problem of institutional voids, elasticity to exploit unexpected increase in demand and efficiency to serve large volumes. Based on the evidence, the authors suggest the introduction of global efficiency measures as the boundary conditions of business model adaptation in emerging markets.

Research limitations/implications

The paper contributes to the literature on business models by suggesting elasticity as a unique design feature relevant for emerging markets. This paper provides granular understanding of business model toxicity.

Practical implications

Entrepreneurs and managers – looking to enter emerging markets through opportunity creation – should focus on providing contextually novel design features in the adapted business model. The authors also caution practitioners against the perils of toxicity arising out of combining contextual novelty with efficiency.

Originality/value

Recent literature suggests that multinationals need contextual intelligence to successfully monetize their investment in emerging economies. This paper provides rich description of the challenges faced by entrepreneurs in emerging markets, local innovations used to overcome them and boundary conditions.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 31 March 2015

Mukund R. Dixit and Sanjay Verma

This case describes the teaching and learning processes in Ayurveda, the ancient Indian system of medicine as explained by Vaidya Hardikar. He practised the system of…

Abstract

This case describes the teaching and learning processes in Ayurveda, the ancient Indian system of medicine as explained by Vaidya Hardikar. He practised the system of diagnosis through ‘Nadi Nidan’, pulse reading and treated patients according to the principles of Ayurveda, the ancient Indian system of Medicine. The transfer of knowledge happened through formal and informal processes where he assisted his father and other practitioners in preparing medicines, interrogating the patients and pronouncing diagnosis. The participants can identify and analyze the various processes in the transfer of tacit and explicit knowledge.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 28 August 2013

Mukund R. Dixit and D. Karthik

This exercise describes the competitive dynamics situation faced by two large companies, Colgate – Palmolive and Proctor and Gamble in oral care business. Both of them…

Abstract

This exercise describes the competitive dynamics situation faced by two large companies, Colgate – Palmolive and Proctor and Gamble in oral care business. Both of them introduced a tooth whitening solutions and anticipated to sustain their competitive lead. P&G introduced its solution in August 2000 and Colgate followed it in September 2002. This was followed by another introduction by Colgate April 2003. The intensified the competitive battle between the two companies. The participants are required to get into the shoes of either Colgate or P&G to think through a competitive strategy. The case provides information on the estimated demand for tooth whitening solutions, gains and losses of the two companies, R&D expenditure, players in the oral hygiene market and legal framework for complaining to facilitate the analysis of the situation and decision making by the participants. The case can be used in modules on competitive strategy, innovation, and economics of strategy.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 10 January 2013

Mukund R. Dixit and Sanjay Verma

This case provides an opportunity to identify and discuss issues in sustenance of an incumbent's strategy in the changing environment. The context is the practice of Nadi…

Abstract

This case provides an opportunity to identify and discuss issues in sustenance of an incumbent's strategy in the changing environment. The context is the practice of Nadi Nidan (pulse diagnosis) and treatment of disorders based on this according to Ayurveda, the ancient system of Indian medicine. It describes the functioning of Bharadwaj Aushadhalay, an Ayurveda clinic run by Vaidyaji since 1955 and presents the history of the clinic, the process by which Vaidyaji learnt the practice of Nadi Nidan, the profile of the patients, the mode of treatment, restrictions imposed by Vaidyaji on the patients, their response and competitive pressures on the system. The case also provides a brief sketch of Ayurveda, its principles, currents trends in the education and research in Ayurveda, and recent advances in diagnostic tools and techniques. The case can be used in courses of Strategic Management in the module on Strategies for Sustainable Competitive Advantage and Knowledge Management.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Safal Batra, Sunil Sharma, Mukund R Dixit, Neharika Vohra and Vishal K Gupta

Industry appropriability – the degree to which firms in an industry can appropriate benefits from their innovations – is a crucial dimension of industry environment. Small…

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Abstract

Purpose

Industry appropriability – the degree to which firms in an industry can appropriate benefits from their innovations – is a crucial dimension of industry environment. Small and medium manufacturing enterprises (manufacturing SMEs), because of their limited resource base, tend to be especially sensitive to the appropriability conditions in their industry. The purpose of this paper is to understand the influence of industry appropriability on firm outcomes (innovativeness and performance), and posits technology orientation as a dynamic capability that helps firms overcome appropriability barriers in their industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 162 manufacturing SMEs in India. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

This study reveals that the perceived level of appropriability of manufacturing SMEs impacts their innovativeness. Further, findings also support technology orientation as a crucial firm-specific characteristic which enables firms to overcome unfavorable appropriability conditions. Technology orientation plays a significant role in mitigating the negative impact of lower appropriability conditions. Even when the patent regime is unfavorable, technology-oriented firms are able to innovate and perform better.

Practical implications

The findings suggest technology orientation as a strategic mechanism for manufacturing SMEs to respond to conditions of unfavorable appropriability regime.

Originality/value

This study elaborates the benefits of integrating industry-level and firm-level characteristics. Specifically, an attempt was made to extend the existing research on industry appropriability by bringing in the contingent effect of technology orientation. The context of manufacturing SMEs yielded several interesting insights.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2016

Safal Batra, Sunil Sharma, Mukund Dixit and Neharika Vohra

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a multi-dimensional second-order operationalization of strategic planning, to advance the understanding of this construct.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a multi-dimensional second-order operationalization of strategic planning, to advance the understanding of this construct.

Design/methodology/approach

Data on the strategic planning construct were collected using survey questionnaire administered to 123 small and medium-sized manufacturing enterprises (SMEs) in India.

Findings

The findings clearly reveal that the strategic planning construct can be effectively operationalized as a second-order multi-dimensional construct.

Research limitations/implications

Data for this study have been collected primarily from SMEs of manufacturing firms. Further investigation in other kinds of firms may help in the enhancement of the construct.

Originality/value

Scholars have long called for using second-order constructs in strategy research. Operationalizing multi-dimensional constructs as unidimensional leads to inaccurate results and interpretations. By demonstrating a second-order operationalization of strategic planning, the authors illustrate better ways of operationalizing a construct. At the same time, this operationalization should help in better understanding of the implications of strategic planning on firm performance.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 23 June 2015

Mukund Dixit and H. Anil Kumar

This case presents the details of origin, strategy, and performance of Tata McGraw Hill Education Private Limited. It describes the initiatives of Mr. Shukla, Managing…

Abstract

This case presents the details of origin, strategy, and performance of Tata McGraw Hill Education Private Limited. It describes the initiatives of Mr. Shukla, Managing Director and Vice President, in maintaining the leadership of the company in a changing environment. The participants are required to assume the role of a new leader of the company, comprehend the initiatives and their impact on the performance, and formulate a strategy for the next five years.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 19 November 2001

Mukund Dixit and Vandana Dixit

This case describes the experience of Kanpur Confectioneries Private Limited (KCPL), a family managed company, in being a contract manufacturer for A–One Confectioneries…

Abstract

This case describes the experience of Kanpur Confectioneries Private Limited (KCPL), a family managed company, in being a contract manufacturer for A–One Confectioneries Private Limited. The alliance had worked to the advantage of KCPL. It had prospered as a profitable contract manufacturer. It had used the surplus to diversify into unrelated businesses. The family members, however had doubts regarding the employment opportunities provided by the move. They were not sure whether the progress was sustainable. Alok Kumar Gupta, Chairman and Managing Director of KCPL, along with his brothers and son, is required to review the strategy and performance of his company and develop a course of action for the future.

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

Keywords

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