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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Muhammad Ashraf Sharif and Khalid Mahmood

Selected volumes of the Pakistan Development Review (PDR) and the Pakistan Economic and Social Review (PESR) were analysed to find the citation pattern of their articles…

Abstract

Selected volumes of the Pakistan Development Review (PDR) and the Pakistan Economic and Social Review (PESR) were analysed to find the citation pattern of their articles. Eight volumes of each journal were selected, two volumes representing a decade. The results revealed that the PDR has been the most cited journal. The mean score of citations per article remained insignificantly different in the two core journals. More than 50 per cent of the citations from both journals were single‐authored. More than 50 per cent of the citations were from non‐journal sources, mainly books. Although citations from online sources were seen, it was a negligible number. About 47 per cent of the total citations of the PDR were up to five years old compared with the citations of the PESR, where only 25 per cent fell into this category. Most of the authors used foreign books as citations. There is a significant similarity in the top most cited journals in both cases. Most of the frequently cited journals were from the USA.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 May 2020

Muhammad Ashraf, Jamil Ahmad, Wareesa Sharif, Arslan Ali Raza, Muhammad Salman Shabbir, Mazhar Abbas and Ramayah Thurasamy

This study examines the role of continuous trust (i.e., a trust that develops over time as a result of continuous usage interactions) in determining customers' intention…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the role of continuous trust (i.e., a trust that develops over time as a result of continuous usage interactions) in determining customers' intention to continue using online product recommendations (OPRs).

Design/methodology/approach

Based on information system (IS), continuance model, and continuous trust, we propose that continuous trust will influence customers’ intention to continue OPRs’ use directly and indirectly via their satisfaction and usefulness of the OPRs. The research model is tested using data collected via an online survey from 626 existing users of OPRs in 15 different countries.

Findings

The empirical results revealed that continuous trust is shown to be a significant predictor of customers’ intention to continue OPRs use for future purchases. Additionally, the customers’ perceived confirmation and continuous trust positively influence their perceived usefulness and satisfaction with the OPRs, which subsequently influence customers’ OPRs continuous usage intention.

Research limitations/implications

The saliency of continuous trust and usefulness of OPRs present e-retailers with potential fruitful areas to shape future usage of OPRs. In addition, e-retailers must understand that improving the OPR usefulness on its own may not lead to OPRs continuous usage until OPRs trustworthiness is not continually improved. OPRs itself may be convenient and useful, but trustworthy OPRs will pay stronger dividends for customer satisfaction and OPRs’ continuous usage.

Originality/value

The incorporation of continuous trust into the IS continuance model offers a new theoretical lens and an alternative explanation for the OPR continuous usage intention. This study stands in contrast to the large majority of research concerning initial trust and OPRs adoption, in that it focuses on continuous trust (as opposed to initial trust) and on a customers’ OPRs continuous usage intention as opposed to the initial adoption decision.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

M.M. Metwally

Introduction Although there is no Muslim country, at present, which can be called an Islamic economy, in the sense of following, in a strict fashion, the teachings of the…

Abstract

Introduction Although there is no Muslim country, at present, which can be called an Islamic economy, in the sense of following, in a strict fashion, the teachings of the Qur'an, the traditions of Prophet Muhammad and the practices of early Muslims, a majority of Muslim consumers would seem to hold to Islamic values and views regarding the disposal of their incomes. The aim of this paper is to throw some light on the effect of this behaviour on optimal consumption of a Muslim individual. The paper is divided into three sections. Section one briefly summarises the economic behaviour of a non‐religious (rational) consumer. Section two discusses the utility function of a Muslim consumer and highlights the differences between this function and that of a non‐Muslim consumer. Section three determines the conditions of optimum consumption of a Muslim consumer.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Article
Publication date: 27 March 2018

Muhammad Arsalan Hashmi, Rayenda Khresna Brahmana and Evan Lau

This paper aims to investigate the effect of political connections on earnings quality by simultaneously controlling the firm characteristics; to test whether Pakistani…

1676

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effect of political connections on earnings quality by simultaneously controlling the firm characteristics; to test whether Pakistani firms’ ownership, specifically family ownership, plays a significant role in political connections–earnings quality association; to draw a conclusion about the agency theory in the context of Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative approach was used to examine the influence of political connections and family ownership on the earnings quality of listed firms in Pakistan. The study uses historical data from 238 active non-financial firms listed on the Pakistan Stock Exchange during the period of 2009-2015. The final data set comprises more than 1,600 firm-year observations from ten major non-financial industry classifications. To enhance the robustness of the empirical relationship, the study used several proxies of earnings quality in conjunction with robust regression methods and diagnostic checks.

Findings

The present study’s findings are consistent with the findings of the studies on agency theory previous literature, where politically connected firms have significantly lower earnings quality as compared to non-connected firms. The results also indicate that family firms have superior earnings quality than non-family–controlled firms. Furthermore, family ownership moderates the negative influence of political connections on earnings quality. This implies that family ownership diminishes the costs of political connections and improves the earnings quality of the firm.

Originality/value

This study is different from previous research in three respects. First, it examines whether family ownership concentration has a moderating influence on the relationship between political connections and earnings quality. Second, it uses a robust methodology and extensive data set to examine the influence of political connections and family ownership concentration on earnings quality. Further, this study is the first to analyze the nexus between financial reporting quality and the political business environment in the context of Pakistan.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Principles and Fundamentals of Islamic Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-674-7

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2021

Ali Amin, Muhammad Arshad, Naheed Sultana and Rabeeya Raoof

The rapid spread of COVID-19 has dramatic effects on financial market across the globe. This study analyzes the relationship between the COVID-19 cases, age and stock…

Abstract

Purpose

The rapid spread of COVID-19 has dramatic effects on financial market across the globe. This study analyzes the relationship between the COVID-19 cases, age and stock market indexes in Central America, North America, and South America.

Design/methodology/approach

The panel regression analysis on three regions from March 10, 2020 to April 9, 2020 was conducted to test the hypothesized model. The authors used Levin et al.’s (2002) panel data unit root test to check the stationarity, and Hausman (1978) test was applied to determine the random and fixed effects.

Findings

The authors’ panel regression results indicate that the COVID-19 cases have a negative impact on stock indexes, whereas the age has a positive impact on the stock indexes. The region-wise analysis supports the panel finding except for South America, which shows an insignificant association between stock indexes and COVID-19 cases.

Originality/value

The study supplements the literature by examining the impact of pandemics on stock indexes and focus on three multicultural regions, comprising developed, developing and emerging countries, which are hitherto unaddressed.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

Expert briefing
Publication date: 15 April 2015

Outlook for bilateral relations.

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-DB198925

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Article
Publication date: 26 February 2021

Khairul Hidayatullah Basir and Siti Fatimahwati Pehin Dato Musa

This paper aims to provide an understanding of agripreneurs motivation from the Islamic perspective. The objective of this paper is to explore the proposition that…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an understanding of agripreneurs motivation from the Islamic perspective. The objective of this paper is to explore the proposition that motivations to become agripreneurs is directly influenced by religious intentions and Islamic values, which would indirectly have an effect on entrepreneurial behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory qualitative approach was used to capture the respondents’ Islamic values and intentions, which motivate them to become agripreneurs. In-depth face-to-face interviewing technique was adopted whereby the respondents were asked to share their thoughts, views and understanding of the issues presented. A sample of five Muslim agripreneurs were interviewed for this study.

Findings

The study found that Islam plays a significant role in influencing the agripreneurs entrepreneurial motivation. Their entrepreneurial behaviour is also underpinned by some Islamic values, which have a positive impact on their mindsets and the growth of their businesses; such as having utmost faith in Allah (taqwa) and believing that Allah is the sole provider, makes them fearless in the business environment and results in a healthy competition amongst agripreneurs.

Research limitations/implications

The study has several limitations. Firstly, the study is based on a small sample of five Muslim agripreneurs who are willing to be interviewed in a specific Islamic environment such as Brunei. Thus, the findings cannot be generalised and may not be a true reflection of all Islamic countries and to Muslims residing in countries in which they are not the majority. Secondly, cultural differences within a country may influence the attitude towards entrepreneurship and entrepreneurship intentions. As this study focusses on Brunei, which is based on Malay Islamic Monarchy, the motivations might be different in other countries because of the cultural differences. Thirdly, agriculture types in this study are limited. Finally, the methodology is purely qualitative.

Practical implications

The findings may assist the government to devise strategies and policies to attract more youth into agriculture particularly in creating a supportive environment for the farmers.

Social implications

The findings of this paper have shown that their Islamic motivations and values result in a more socially responsible entrepreneur in shaping the economy and community at large and more importantly, it also brings them closer to Allah.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the role of Islam in influencing and motivating the respondents to become agripreneurs and persevere in the challenging business environment.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2017

Muhammad Yousuf Ali, Malcolm Wolski and Joanna Richardson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how to help improve a higher education institution’s research profile by using existing resources and existing research outputs.

1123

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how to help improve a higher education institution’s research profile by using existing resources and existing research outputs.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was based on quantitative data extracted manually from QS University Rankings-Asia 2016, the 2015 Ranking of Pakistani higher education institutions (HEI) and ResearchGate (RG). Resultant data were loaded into Excel and analyzed in SPSS version 21.

Findings

The results of this study indicate that, while there is no direct correlation between an institution’s national/international ranking and its respective RG score, there is a tendency for lower-ranked institutions to have a lower RG score.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited to data extracted from RG; however, it would be useful to apply the same methodology to other relevant academic scholarly network sites (ASNS).

Practical implications

This paper has suggested strategies which may be of relevance to those institutions in other countries which are aspiring to lift their national ranking through improved research profiles. Libraries are important contributors to the support of institutional research goals.

Originality/value

There have been no previous published research studies on either the potential for ASNS to contribute to enhancing research outcomes for Pakistani HEI or the role that libraries could play in supporting these outcomes.

Article
Publication date: 20 October 2021

Muhammad Mushafiq

The main purpose of this study is to evaluate COVID-19’s impact on the emerging stock markets.

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to evaluate COVID-19’s impact on the emerging stock markets.

Design/methodology/approach

To evaluate the influence of COVID-19, this study uses a novel method of event study methodology to measure the impact of COVID-19 on emerging stock markets. The research’s sample includes a total of 79 firms from 26 industries that are included in the KSE-100 Index from the Pakistan Stock Exchange. Three events were studied: (1) Announcement of the first case, (2) Start of lockdown and (3) End of lockdown.

Findings

This study establishes the findings that industries in the Pakistan Stock Exchange were overall negatively affected by the COVID-19. Commercial banks, Insurance, Real Estate and Textile were badly affected by the COVID-19. However, the Pharmaceutical, Refinery and Food and Personal Care Products industries had shown a positive response.

Practical implications

This study could bring in a new and useful insight into the literature on the impact of COVID-19 on the emerging stock markets. The results of this study provide insight to the investors in the emerging stock markets of the industries that are likely to show responses either negative or positive to news of regional or global outbreaks, lockdowns and end of lockdowns.

Originality/value

The work on COVID-19 has been mostly limited to the developed markets and the emerging markets have been overlooked. This study is a potential gateway to future works regarding pandemics in emerging markets.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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