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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2013

Ian D. Blackman, Christopher P. Holland and Timothy Westcott

The purpose of this paper is to define and explore the concept of financial supply chain strategy in a global business environment. The paper aims to illustrate the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define and explore the concept of financial supply chain strategy in a global business environment. The paper aims to illustrate the concepts with a detailed case study of Motorola's global financial supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a detailed, longitudinal case study analysis of a focal organisation and its economic partners in a financial supply chain. The case study combines qualitative analysis of the strategy evolution with extensive time‐series data and quantitative analyses of the performance of the financial supply chain.

Findings

The financial supply chain is an integral component of Motorola's overall supply chain management strategy. Physical product, information systems and financial flows are closely aligned with each other throughout the supply chain incorporating Motorola, its customers, suppliers and banks. The overall trend is towards the development of an integrated global financial supply chain in which cash flows mirror product flows. Motorola shares financial data with its suppliers as part of a cooperative strategy that generates cost savings for Motorola and its suppliers in areas such as foreign exchange and cash balances. The cooperative strategy also improves the quality of the payments process measured by six sigma techniques and produces strategic benefits such as risk reduction for the supply chain as a whole in areas such as foreign exchange and payments. A strategy of this type is only possible by taking a global perspective of the financial supply chain.

Research limitations/implications

The development of financial supply chains has not been fully addressed in the supply chain management literature. This paper defines this relatively new topic area and explains its significance in its own right, and also in terms of the inter‐relationships between finance and manufacturing supply chains. A research agenda for financial supply chains is proposed that describes a range of new research opportunities in this area.

Practical implications

The development of integrated financial supply chains will lead to significant savings in terms of funding, banking and administrative costs associated with treasury and payment activities. The implementation and nature of the strategic change also highlight important strategic planning and implementation issues associated with financial supply chains.

Originality/value

The strategic importance of financial supply chains for business and academic researchers is demonstrated through the definition of this topic and the application of a research framework to a detailed study of Motorola's global financial supply chain using time‐series data of strategy evolution and financial supply chain performance. The research findings and comparison with theory support the assertion that this is a relatively new and unexplored problem area that is of direct relevance and interest to researchers in supply chain management.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Michael G. Winston

Suggests that Motorola faces new challenges brought on by its explosive growth. Describes how the company has always had a people‐oriented culture and stresses three key…

Abstract

Suggests that Motorola faces new challenges brought on by its explosive growth. Describes how the company has always had a people‐oriented culture and stresses three key principles: leadership of renewal, renewal of leadership and thinking the unthinkable. States that Motorola is willing and eager to change, realizing that success depends on adaptability, flexibility and speed.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Sue Shaw

This article considers the extent to which a corporate university transcends national boundaries through an examination of the operation of Motorola University in China…

Abstract

Purpose

This article considers the extent to which a corporate university transcends national boundaries through an examination of the operation of Motorola University in China. The aim is to extend understanding of the role and function of a corporate university and the human resource management (HRM) convergence/divergence debate within an Asian‐Pacific context.

Design/methodology/approach

Documentary evidence and in‐depth interviews were used to explore the role and operation of Motorola University China and to assess the impact of the Chinese context on the global Motorola University brand.

Findings

Set up first and foremost to develop and grow young Chinese managers, Motorola University China now exhibits various features of a world‐class corporate university as well as a strong corporate brand, thereby giving support to the convergence debate. At the same time there is evidence that China's economic, political and cultural context mediates the operation of Motorola University China.

Research limitations/implications

This study was exploratory, based on a single case and, notwithstanding the problems associated with comparative research, further research is needed to determine the relative importance of different contextual variables and the precise nature of knowledge transfer between the corporate university headquarters and the host country operation and the role of the specialist function within it.

Originality/value

The results provide tentative support for the proposition that corporate universities of global corporations can transcend national boundaries whilst at the same time being mediated by the political, economic and cultural characteristics of the host country.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Rohit Bhatnagar and S. Viswanathan

During the 1990s, globalization and time‐based competition have emerged as important business strategies leading to renewed emphasis on the logistics function. This has…

Abstract

During the 1990s, globalization and time‐based competition have emerged as important business strategies leading to renewed emphasis on the logistics function. This has opened up opportunities for strategic alliances between manufacturing firms and specialized logistics services providers, with each partner focusing on its core area of competence. Although such alliances are common in North America and Europe, the determinants of success of such partnerships in the global context are not well researched and understood. Moreover this concept is relatively new in Asia. This paper presents an overview of the issues that impact the success of a strategic partnership between manufacturing firms and global logistics services providers (GLSPs). A case study featuring Motorola’s Semiconductor Products Sector and United Parcel Service (UPS) is described, for bringing out the important tradeoffs in such an alliance.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Robert Schieffer and Min Chen

The spin-off of Iridium, a global telecommunications system, represented a significant business risk for Motorola, as many talented Motorola executives joined the venture…

Abstract

The spin-off of Iridium, a global telecommunications system, represented a significant business risk for Motorola, as many talented Motorola executives joined the venture in the late 1990s. This bold technology gamble suffered from numerous marketing missteps, which led to Iridium's bankruptcy in August 1999.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

P.M. Herder, W.W. Veeneman, M.D.J. Buitenhuis and A. Schaller

This paper describes the development of a knowledge management framework for the “new product introduction process” of Motorola. Motorola operates in a very dynamic…

Abstract

This paper describes the development of a knowledge management framework for the “new product introduction process” of Motorola. Motorola operates in a very dynamic business with short product cycles, and has a clear need, therefore, to leverage the knowledge available worldwide. After developing a theoretical framework that reflected Motorola’s business processes, a large‐scale survey among workers at different locations in the world was conducted. The survey results were used for the design of a knowledge management framework, which supports sharing of various types of knowledge on different business levels.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Motorola considers education to be an employee right as well as a responsibility, and every Motorola employee must complete at least 40 hours of training a year. This…

Abstract

Motorola considers education to be an employee right as well as a responsibility, and every Motorola employee must complete at least 40 hours of training a year. This usually takes place at Motorola University, which is probably the best known and most widely benchmarked corporate university in the world. Not only employees, but also Motorola customers and employees take courses at Motorola University. Moreover, the university offers language training not only to employees, but also to their spouses and other family members, in order to give the learners the chance to practise their skills.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Dan Steinbock

This article examines the dynamics of wireless R&D as a combined function of technology and market evolution, focusing on the management and organization of wireless R&D…

Abstract

This article examines the dynamics of wireless R&D as a combined function of technology and market evolution, focusing on the management and organization of wireless R&D. From the postwar era to the late 1990s, the management and organization of wireless R&D capabilities has been effectively reversed. Industry thrust has shifted from closed specifications, central innovation and domestic market to open specifications, distributed innovation and global networking. The old era is reflected by the classic Bell Labs; the new era by Nokia. Due to the alternation of sustaining and disruptive change, no wireless company can survive without incessant innovation. In this rivalry, the winners are companies that best match their organizational capabilities with the changing industry opportunities.

Details

info, vol. 4 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Book part
Publication date: 19 August 2015

Alex James Wilson and John Joseph

This study examines the effects of organizational attention on technological search in the multibusiness firm. We argue that attentional specialization and coupling, or…

Abstract

This study examines the effects of organizational attention on technological search in the multibusiness firm. We argue that attentional specialization and coupling, or (respectively) attention given to problems within and across units, affect a unit’s ability to engage in distant and local search by shaping how problems are perceived and addressed. We test this theory by applying a probabilistic topic model to all Motorola patents issued from 1974 to 1997, thus identifying and measuring attention to technical problems. Our results suggest that (a) subunits with specialized attention are not myopic but instead explore broadly and (b) tight attentional coupling across units increases the breadth of search. This study contributes to attention-based views of the firm and to studies on organizational design and search.

Details

Cognition and Strategy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-946-2

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Case study
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Russell Walker

This case challenges students to solve a riddle: How did Motorola's share in the Indian market fall so dramatically while cell phone adoption in India skyrocketed and…

Abstract

This case challenges students to solve a riddle: How did Motorola's share in the Indian market fall so dramatically while cell phone adoption in India skyrocketed and Motorola was launching one of its most successful products globally? The case is set in the mid-2000s, when Motorola had just rolled out the Razr phone and the firm was approaching the ten-year anniversary of its entry to the Indian market. Motorola's market share in India had fallen from as high as 31% in 1998 to less than 5% in 2006. This dramatic downturn came at a time of immense growth in the Indian cell phone market.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

Keywords

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