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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2020

Catherine Komugisha Tindiwensi, Ernest Abaho, John C. Munene, Moses Muhwezi and Isaac N. Nkote

The purpose of this paper is to analyse how entrepreneurial bricolage empowers smallholder commercial farming, from a family business perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse how entrepreneurial bricolage empowers smallholder commercial farming, from a family business perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a multiple case study design to analyse entrepreneurial bricolage in smallholder commercial farming in Uganda. It used multiple data collection methods and applied content analytical tchniques to establish cross-case correlations, patterns and relationships to aid in theory development and testing.

Findings

The study shows that entrepreneurial bricolage empowers smallholder commercialization through resource reallocation, improvization and prioritization as interconnected, self-reinforcing bricolage processes in smallholder farming. It provides evidence of how smallholder farms may not enact institutional limits, and overcome constraints imposed by their resource environments. It further reveals that smallholder commercial farms can be construed as family businesses given the interconnected relationship between farming business, family and smallholder farm(er).

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in smallholder farms hence results may be used cautiously in other sectors and economies where resource environments are not structurally defined. However, it provides lessons for family businesses in developed countries particularly the micro- and small businesses. It also renders smallholder farming as a lucrative area for family business research.

Originality/value

This study deepens our understanding of bricolage in smallholder farming and provides a springboard for scholarship in enhancing smallholder commercialization. It proposes a model for entrepreneurial bricolage in smallholder commercial farming.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Brenda Tumuramye, Joseph Mpeera Ntayi and Moses Muhwezi

This study aims to investigate the whistle-blowing behaviour in Ugandan public procurement by using whistle-blowing supporting institutions, procuring and disposing entity…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the whistle-blowing behaviour in Ugandan public procurement by using whistle-blowing supporting institutions, procuring and disposing entity (PDE) ethical climate and whistle-blowing expectancy.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative cross-sectional survey was conducted using a sample of 118 drawn from a population of 179 central government (PDEs). Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires, resulting in 222 usable questionnaires from 70 PDEs, representing a response rate of 62.71 per cent.

Findings

The results reveal that the whistle-blowing supporting institutions and PDE ethical climate are significant predictors of whistle-blowing intentions and behaviour, accounting for 30.2 per cent of the variance. The authors therefore recommend that whistle-blowing supporting institutions, like the Whistle Blowers Protection Act, should be reviewed and strengthened to promote whistle-blowing intentions and behaviour. This could be done through reviewing the Act to make it enforceable, giving power to the whistle-blowers, strengthening policies, developing safeguards against retaliation by making every chief executive officer in the public sector accountable, increasing whistle-blowing incentives and providing whistle-blowing hotlines for anonymous whistle-blowers. PDEs should also create conducive ethical climates that encourage people to voice their concerns internally or externally, and ethical committees should be established within PDEs and other bodies such as the Inspector General of Government for ensuring that whistle-blowing systems are in place and promoted. There is a need to increase whistle-blowing expectancy through the effective handling of reported cases to their conclusion and the use of role models.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 December 2021

Henry Mutebi, Moses Muhwezi, Joseph Mpeera Ntayi, Samuel Ssekajja Mayanja and John C. Kigozi Munene

Organisations involved in relief delivery tend to have cross-boundary mandates, which cause ambiguity of roles during delivery of relief services to the targeted victims…

Abstract

Purpose

Organisations involved in relief delivery tend to have cross-boundary mandates, which cause ambiguity of roles during delivery of relief services to the targeted victims. Having no clear role, specialisation affects service timeliness and increases resource duplication among the relief organisations. The objective of this study is to understand how organisational networks and organisational learning as complex adaptive system metaphors improve both organisational adaptability and role clarity in humanitarian logistics.

Design/methodology/approach

Using ordinary partial least squares regression through SmartPLS version 3.3.3, the authors tested the study hypotheses basing on survey data collected from 315 respondents who were selected randomly to complete a self-administered questionnaire from 101 humanitarian organisations. Common method bias (CMB) associated with surveys was minimised by implementing both procedural and post statistics methods.

Findings

The results indicate that organisational networks and organisational learning have a significant influence on organisational adaptability and role clarity. The results also show that organisational adaptability partially mediates in the relationship between organisational networks, organisational learning and role clarity.

Research limitations/implications

The major limitation of the study is that the authors have used cross-sectional data to test this research hypotheses. However, this was minimised following Guide and Ketokivi's (2015) recommendation on how to address the limitations of cross-sectional data or the use of longitudinal data that can address CMB and endogeneity problems.

Practical implications

Managers in humanitarian organisations can use the authors’ framework to understand, first, how complex adaptive system competence can be used to create organisational adaptability and, second, how organisational adaptability can help organisational networks and organisational learning in improving role clarity among humanitarian organisations by collaboratively working together.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the existing body of knowledge in humanitarian logistics and supply chain management by empirically testing the anecdotal and conceptual evidence. The findings may be useful to managers who are contemplating the use of organisational networks, organisational learning and organisational adaptability to improve role clarity in disaster relief-related activities.

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2022

Charles Kalinzi, Joseph Mpeera Ntayi, Levi Bategeka Kabagambe, Moses Muhwezi and John Kigozi Munene

This paper aims to quantify, for the first time, the performance expectations gap in community roadworks projects by proposing a performance expectations gap index (PEGI…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to quantify, for the first time, the performance expectations gap in community roadworks projects by proposing a performance expectations gap index (PEGI) that can answer a vital question of how wide/how narrow the gap is from a stakeholder perspective. Previous scholars have offered qualitative descriptions of the expectations gap from an auditing point of view using a constructivist approach. This study uses a positivistic approach in addressing the procurement performance expectations gap.

Design/methodology/approach

The index is computed by combining data from actual and perceived performance of public roadworks from two categories of respondents: “Technical personnel” and “Road users” in selected District Local Governments (DLGS) of Uganda using paired mean differences. The authors created grand means from these two groups for us to make a meaningful comparison. Data were collected from community access roads projects opened, maintained and completed and the satisfaction levels from 69 DLGS. The community leaders and political representatives formed a group of road-users, whereas DLG Engineering staff represented the technical staff. Data was collected on the extent to which the DLG had achieved performance efficiency, performance effectiveness and performance reasonableness. The measurements items was anchored along the continuum of: (5) Outstanding = Performance is consistently superior to (1) Unsatisfactory = Performance is consistently unacceptable.

Findings

Study findings show the level of performance of roadworks attained by technical staff is only 65%, with 15.9% gap is attributed to performance efficiency, the 29.1% gap is attributed to performance effectiveness issues and 20% gap is the perceived performance unreasonableness gap in the stakeholder’s perspective, creating an overall performance gap of 35%, in the perspective of road users. From the computations carried out, the authors determined the size of the expectation gaps by the technical DLG stakeholders and road-users of 0.3493. The gap index (0.3493) falls within the range between 0.2 and 0.39, which is a small performance expectations gap, calling for top management’s attention to identify and work on the parameters causing operational inefficiency within implementing units of DLGs. Study findings show the level of performance of roadworks attained by technical staff is 65%, creating a performance gap of 35%, in the perspective of road users.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of these results can ignite a meaningful debate on whether financing of road projects should be based on how narrow the performance gap should be and having sustained evidence that the gap is progressively being narrowed for improved sustainability of roadworks financing by donor agencies. Whereas this quantification of the performance gap is a new positivistic direction towards minimizing the performance expectation gap, it can easily be adopted by roadworks implementing units in assessing road-user performance needs at the point of project completion and once these are not achieved, such minor loopholes would be worked on, on a regular basis as and when need warrants.

Practical implications

The authors have introduced and empirically verified the performance expectation gap index, which further understands the performance expectations gap from a positivistic approach. The paper provides a problem-solving tool to analyse stakeholder engagement linkages with performance expectations variations on the practical side.

Social implications

The paper has started on a change perception campaign of shaping road-user critical perspectives about the outcome of community roadworks procurements. By introducing and creating a mindset of quantitative assessments in understanding the expectation gaps that can be caused by a number of factors, the responsible people for creating, maintaining and widening PEGs will eventually wake up and improve personal behaviours that lead to the widening of the procurement performance gap in roadworks, from a stakeholders’ perspective.

Originality/value

Unlike previous scholars who used a constructivist approach, the paper is the first of its kind to use a positivistic approach to quantify the procurement performance expectations gap using a PEGI. The use of the index gives new insights to managing procurement performance expectations to the satisfaction of stakeholders from a quantitative perspective.

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Henry Mutebi, Moses Muhwezi and John C. Kigozi Munene

The purpose of this study was to establish whether self-organisation and its components matter for supply chain agility in the context of humanitarian relief operations in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to establish whether self-organisation and its components matter for supply chain agility in the context of humanitarian relief operations in a developing country, Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a cross-sectional design to collect data from a sample of 101 humanitarian organisations (HOs) that deliver relief to Bidi-Bidi refugee settlement in Uganda.

Findings

Based on the findings, self-organisation explains 56% of the variance in supply chain agility.

Research limitations/implications

Since the study was cross-sectional, changes in the perception of the subject matter could not be established. Hence, a longitudinal approach was recommended for subsequent studies. Data was collected only from HOs that deliver relief services in Bidi-Bidi refugee settlement.

Practical implications

It is recommended that managers of HOs should ensure that their organisations have flexible, adaptive structures that can affect self-organisation during emergencies so as to increase the speed with which they respond to victims' needs.

Originality/value

This study generates significant empirical evidence on a less studied phenomenon in the humanitarian sector. It vividly highlights the effect of self-organisation on building supply chain agility.

Details

International Journal of Emergency Services, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2047-0894

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga, Gorettie Kyeyune Nakyeyune and Moses Muhwezi

Despite the advancement of the assumptions of agency and institutional theories whereby monitoring structures and controls form the basis of management, inadequate public…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the advancement of the assumptions of agency and institutional theories whereby monitoring structures and controls form the basis of management, inadequate public finance regulatory compliance among public entities has continued to be a challenge. The purpose of this paper is to examine how to break out of the apparent cycle of failures to comply with public finance regulations.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study that integrates two approaches (cooperative and coercive models) drawing from the view that in central government agencies, there may be stewards and also agents motivated by self-interest, suggesting that the most promising framework is that which renders the traditional ways of achieving regulatory compliance to be supplemented with the stewardship model. Thus, the authors focus on four variables: management mechanisms, ethical climate, deterrence measures and public finance regulatory compliance all drawn from agency, institutional and stewardship theories. The authors collect data from 67 central government agencies in Uganda using a structured questionnaire.

Findings

The authors find that management mechanisms dimensions of leadership support and organisational commitment significantly associate with public finance regulatory compliance and so too are deterrence measures particularly oversight organs, penalties and procedural justices.

Research limitations/implications

Public finance regulatory compliance can be improved through management mechanisms and deterrence measures.

Originality/value

The study generates empirical evidence on the applicability of stewardship theory in the management of public entities for regulatory compliance

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2020

Henry Mutebi, Joseph Mpeera Ntayi, Moses Muhwezi and John C. Kigozi Munene

To coordinate humanitarian organisations with different mandates that flock the scenes of disasters to save lives and respond to varied needs arising from the increased…

Abstract

Purpose

To coordinate humanitarian organisations with different mandates that flock the scenes of disasters to save lives and respond to varied needs arising from the increased number of victims is not easy. Therefore, the level at which organisations self-organise, network and adapt to the dynamic operational environment may be related to inter-organisational coordination. The authors studied self-organisation, organisational networks and adaptability as important and often overlooked organisational factors hypothesised to be related to inter-organisational coordination in the context of humanitarian organisations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study’s sample consisted of 101 humanitarian organisations with 315 respondents. To decrease the problem of common method variance, the authors split the samples within each humanitarian organisation into two subsamples: one subsample was used for the measurement of self-organisation, organisational network and adaptability, while the other was for the measurement of inter-organisational coordination.

Findings

The partial least square structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) analysis using SmartPLS 3.2.8 indicated that self-organisation is related to inter-organisational coordination. Organisational network and adaptability were found to be mediators for the relationship between self-organisation and inter-organisational coordination and all combined accounted for 57.8% variance in inter-organisational coordination.

Research limitations/implications

The study was cross sectional, hence imposing a limitation on changes in perceptions over time. Perhaps, a longitudinal study in future is desirable. Data were collected only from humanitarian organisations that had delivered relief to refugees in the stated camps by 2018. Above all, this study considered self-organisation, adaptability and organisational networks in the explanation of inter-organisational coordination, although there are other factors that could still be explored.

Practical implications

A potential implication is that humanitarian organisations which need to coordinate with others in emergency situations may need to examine their ability to self-organise, network and adapt.

Social implications

Social transformation is a function of active social entities that cannot work in isolation. Hence, for each to be able to make a contribution to meaningful social change, there is need to develop organisational networks with sister organisations so as to secure rare resources that facilitate change efforts coupled with the ability to reorganise themselves and adapt to changing environmental circumstances.

Originality/value

The paper examines (1) the extent to which self-organisation, adaptability and organisational networks influence inter-organisational coordination; (2) the mediating role of both adaptability and organisational networks between self-organisation and inter-organisational coordination in the context of humanitarian organisations against the backdrop of complex adaptive system (CAS) theory.

Details

Journal of Humanitarian Logistics and Supply Chain Management, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga, Moses Muhwezi and Venancio Tauringana

The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of a study carried out to determine the use of Management Accounting Practices (MAPR) in Ugandan secondary schools…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of a study carried out to determine the use of Management Accounting Practices (MAPR) in Ugandan secondary schools. The study also sought to determine whether MAPR and governing boards (board size, gender diversity and frequency of board meetings) influence the perceived competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is cross-sectional and correlational. Data were collected through a questionnaire survey of 200 secondary schools. The data were analysed through ordinary least squares regression using Statistical Package for Social Scientists.

Findings

There are wide variations in MAP in terms of the extent to which the schools employ management accounting techniques. Also, MAP and governing boards have a predictive force on the schools’ competitive advantage. However, governing board’s size has no effect on competitive advantage. In terms of the control variables, the results suggest that while government school ownership has a positive effect on competitive advantage, the school’s size has no effect. There are intertwining relationships of frequency of board meetings, board size and school size.

Research limitations/implications

The present study was limited to the secondary schools in Uganda which limits generalisability. Still, the results offer important implications for secondary schools’ governing boards, owners and for similar African governments who are a major stakeholder in the secondary school education system. The exact mechanism by which intertwining relationships of frequency of board meetings, board size and school size impact competitive advantage is not been explored in this paper. Future researchers may direct research effort in this endeavour.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to investigate use of MAPR in secondary schools and to provide evidence of their efficacy.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 December 2019

Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga, Elizabeth Mugumya, Irene Nalukenge, Moses Muhwezi and Grace Muganga Najjemba

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship among firm characteristics, innovation, financial resilience and survival of financial institutions in Uganda.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship among firm characteristics, innovation, financial resilience and survival of financial institutions in Uganda.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper employs a cross-sectional research design, and responses from 143 officers of 40 financial institutions are analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences. The authors used ordinary least squares regression in testing the hypotheses.

Findings

The authors find that firm characteristics of size, age, innovation and financial resilience have a predictive force on survival of public interest firms such as financial institutions.

Research limitations/implications

The implication drawn here is that a combination of firm characteristics, firm innovation and financial resilience explains a significant contribution in the survival chances of financial institutions. However, as much as firm characteristics and financial resilience are significant, innovation explains more of the variances in financial institutions’ going concern appropriateness.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the limited financial institutions literature and provides the first empirical evidence of the efficacy of innovation and financial resilience on financial institutions survival. The auditing profession could consider more seriously the innovation activities and financial resilience of financial institutions in their test for the going concern assumption of such firms.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Doreen Musimenta, Stephen Korutaro Nkundabanyanga, Moses Muhwezi, Brenda Akankunda and Irene Nalukenge

The purpose of this paper is to establish the relationship between tax fairness, isomorphic forces, strategic responses and tax compliance in Ugandan small and medium…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish the relationship between tax fairness, isomorphic forces, strategic responses and tax compliance in Ugandan small and medium enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

This is a correlational and cross-sectional study using two respondent types, the demand (represented by the tax collecting body respondents) and supply (represented by SME respondents) sides of tax compliance, to examine perceived tax compliance in Uganda’s SMEs.

Findings

Tax fairness, isomorphic forces and strategic responses have a predictive force on tax compliance. Significant mediation effects of tax fairness and also strategic responses are found. The two respondent types perceive the study variables differently – providing an understanding of why the tax compliance puzzle has remained a burgeoning concern. For example, the tax-collecting body respondents perceived more tax fairness than SME respondents, suggesting that perceived tax fairness depends on whose “lenses” you look through.

Research limitations/implications

Rather than focussing only on the importance of the rational analytical deliberation of tax fairness by taxpayers in influencing their tax compliance, the current paper shows that in addition, isomorphic forces and strategic responses establish the basis for understanding taxpayers’ compliance.

Originality/value

The methodology that enlists two respondent types, i.e. the supply side of tax compliance and the demand side of tax compliance, probably offers a unique way of deriving better results than previous studies.

Details

Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1358-1988

Keywords

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