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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Morten Emil Berg and Jan Terje Karlsen

The purpose of this paper is to describe and discuss how project managers practice a coaching leadership style (CLS).

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6090

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe and discuss how project managers practice a coaching leadership style (CLS).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a case study of an organization practicing coaching in projects.

Findings

The research findings show that to succeed with a CLS, project managers must have a large toolbox, which includes signature strengths, self-management and a give culture. Further, the paper describes how a model consisting of two learning processes can help to implement a CLS in practice.

Research limitations/implications

This study is exploratory, contributing to the development of a substantive theory. Theory testing as well as more in-depth investigation of mental models of a CLS would be valuable.

Practical implications

Coaching leadership theories offer insights that can be leveraged to make project management more effective through improved research foundations.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on how a CLS is carried out in projects and how it can be improved and should thus be of interest to managers searching for tools and models for effective leadership.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 39 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2020

Jan Terje Karlsen and Morten Emil Berg

This paper aims to study the influence of project managers’ signature strengths on project team resilience.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the influence of project managers’ signature strengths on project team resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors performed a qualitative multiple case study design to explore the research question. Open-ended interviews, site visits, observations and documents were the data sources. The authors used character strengths and virtues within positive psychology as a theoretical framework in the data analysis.

Findings

The main finding of this study is that the project manager’s use of signature strengths influences the resilience of the project team. The cross-case analysis revealed four signature strengths – leadership, open-mindedness, persistence and hope – that influenced team resilience in all three studied cases.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should investigate other organizations, types of projects and countries so that the findings may be generalized.

Practical implications

This paper provides managers and teams with useful insights on signature strengths and team resilience. The findings stress the importance of managers being aware of their signature strengths and knowing how to use them. As the working situation today is often more complex, uncertain and difficult than ever, it is important to have resilient managers and teams.

Originality/value

This study contributes to increased knowledge on signature strengths and team resilience.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Morten Emil Berg and Jan Terje Karlsen

The focus of this paper is on management training and development. The purpose has been to address how coaching can be applied to learn about leadership tools and what…

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6600

Abstract

Purpose

The focus of this paper is on management training and development. The purpose has been to address how coaching can be applied to learn about leadership tools and what effect this has on management behaviour and development.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative case study of a management development program. The empirical data were obtained using in‐depth interviews, surveys, and observations. In addition to investigating the 14 participants, data were also collected from their superiors and subordinates.

Findings

One of the main findings is that coaching is a helpful training process to learn about the manager's toolbox and to develop new management behavior. Furthermore, data revealed that the management training should be based on the specific work challenges that the participants experience at their workplace. Based on a variety of work challenges, the participants highlighted the following tools as most important: emotional intelligence, empowerment, self‐management, signature‐strengths, and positive emotions.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should apply a more comprehensive research design, for example, using a control group.

Practical implications

Data analysis shows that coaching is a management training process where the participants can learn to solve real work challenges. By trial and testing at their own workplace, managers learn how to use appropriate tools and change their behaviour. As part of the learning process the authors recommend debriefing where the managers can get feedback and inspiration for self‐reflection. Furthermore, through team and peer coaching, the managers can help each other learn. The authors also recommend that the participant's superiors and subordinates should be involved in the training process.

Originality/value

In this research the authors have studied coaching as a learning and training method applying leadership tools.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Morten Emil Berg and Jan Terje Karlsen

This study provides insight into how project managers can use leadership tools to encourage and develop positive emotions among the project team members toward greater…

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3326

Abstract

Purpose

This study provides insight into how project managers can use leadership tools to encourage and develop positive emotions among the project team members toward greater overall project success. The purpose of this paper is to provide the engineering industry with a closer look at how positive emotions can create good team member relations, reduce stress, develop clearer roles, creativity and joy at the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical data were obtained using in-depth interviews of three experienced project managers.

Findings

The empirical data give insight as to how project managers can use their signature strengths. Additionally, the data also show how they can evolve and draw on positive meaning, positive emotions and positive relations. Various examples of positive meaning, positive emotions, positive relations and signature strengths have been identified and discussed.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should apply a more comprehensive research design, for example a survey using a larger sample, so that these findings may be generalized.

Practical implications

The paper contributes to portray and analyze positive psychology in a project management setting. Additionally, the paper assists understanding the connections among positive meaning, positive emotions, positive relations and signature strengths by presenting and discussing a model.

Originality/value

This research extends current understanding of how project managers use their signature strengths to encourage and develop positive emotions in project teams.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2008

Morten Emil Berg, Geoff Dean, Petter Gottschalk and Jan Terje Karlsen

The paper aims to argue that leadership by police managers is needed to stimulate and encourage knowledge sharing in police investigations, and to report an empirical…

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2042

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to argue that leadership by police managers is needed to stimulate and encourage knowledge sharing in police investigations, and to report an empirical study of what management roles are most important in investigations.

Design/methodology/approach

A research model was designed based on six management roles and a set of hypothesized relationships. A survey measuring management roles and knowledge sharing attitude was conducted in Norway. Respondents were senior investigation officers.

Findings

Only one management role was found to be a significant determinant of knowledge sharing in police investigations based on the sample used in this survey research within the Norwegian police force: the spokesman role was the only significant role. As a spokesman, the senior investigation officer extends organizational contacts to promote acceptance of the unit and the unit's work within the organization of which they are a part.

Research limitations/implications

The low response rate of 20 percent may make it difficult to draw strong conclusions. Unfortunately, the authors have no information about what kinds of non‐response bias might be present (significant variation between the sample and the population). Future research should be more consistent in identifying the population.

Practical implications

While police investigations (of organized crime, trafficking, narcotics, economic crimes, homicide, etc.) need a stimulating internal structure for knowledge sharing, investigations depend on knowledge sharing with relevant persons and departments outside the unit as well to succeed.

Originality/value

Rather than stressing the importance of leadership in general to stimulate knowledge management, this paper is original as it applies a set of management roles to empirically study where leadership makes a difference for knowledge sharing attitudes.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 March 2012

Sara Cervai and Tauno Kekäle

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177

Abstract

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Content available
Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Derek Walker

Downloads
128

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2021

Wilmar Cidral, Carlos Henrique Berg and Maria Lúcia Paulino

The major contribution of this paper is to propose a theoretical framework to coachee success and to identify the most relevant resources for coachee success.

Abstract

Purpose

The major contribution of this paper is to propose a theoretical framework to coachee success and to identify the most relevant resources for coachee success.

Design/methodology/approach

This article attempts to determine the constructs of coaching success through a systematic literature review. The review identified 1,048,880 papers. From these, the authors selected 39 articles for the research. From these articles, the main elements of coaching success were identified.

Findings

The main elements of coaching success are coach quality, coachee engagement, coaching process, coaching reflection, behaviors resulting from coaching and coachee success. Coach quality, coaching process and coachee are often considered as key variables to success. Coachee's behavior is linked to performance but approaches to effectful coaching vary.

Practical implications

Coachee success is connected with the coach's emotional skills and the formality process. Success requires communication, interpersonal relationship, planning, goal setting and progress monitoring. An interplay between the coach and the coachee's emotional skills and the formality process enables success. In business, where employees usually work in their chosen profession, coaching is a tool for education and improvement that brings positive results to the organization.

Social implications

On a personal level, it can lead to greater self-knowledge and to improvement in the quality of life. Coaching as a facilitator of the coachee's success must be more than a process in itself. It is a way of allowing the coachee to make a critical contribution in a broader context to an organizational culture that values human capital.

Originality/value

It contributes to the understanding of the mechanisms that lead to success in coaching. This systematic review adds to the few articles found on coachee success from over a million papers analyzed. It offers a proposed theoretical framework to coachee success, through a holistic approach.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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