Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Morgan P. Miles, Martie-Louise Verreynne, Andrew McAuley and Kevin Hammond

The purpose of this paper is to explore how universities attempt to balance meeting their traditional mission of education, research and community engagement while…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how universities attempt to balance meeting their traditional mission of education, research and community engagement while remaining economically sustainable.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted in 2014 of university executives and found that universities in Australia are rapidly transitioning from public supported institutions to an organizational form much more like social enterprise, with all of the organizational, marketing and ethical ramifications.

Findings

Australian universities were found to be focused on maintaining financial viability and that the most significant source of future revenue for Australian universities is perceived to be from international students.

Originality/value

The findings have tremendous public policy and ethical implications – suggesting a shift in the classification of university education from what was generally considered a public good to what is increasingly perceived as a private good in the contemporary market place, with the increasing importance of international students.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 July 2021

Alain Neher, Alfred Wong and Morgan P. Miles

This study aims to explore if corporations that publicly disclose more information about their managerial values are also more organizationally authentic in enacting these values.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore if corporations that publicly disclose more information about their managerial values are also more organizationally authentic in enacting these values.

Design/methodology/approach

A maturity model of managerial values is used that ordinally ranks a corporation’s level of managerial values enactment using corporate annual reports. The samples of corporations’ corporate reports are qualitatively content analyzed, and the outcomes are statistically tested.

Findings

The findings indicate that as an organization voluntarily discloses more information about its corporate values, it tends to be more likely to enact their espoused values, and their corporation’s level of organizational authenticity increases.

Originality/value

This study suggests an approach to benchmark a corporation’s level of organizational authenticity using public information, and by doing so, contributes to both policy and practice by offering a framework to compare organizational authenticity between public corporations by their sector, size or the age of the corporation.

Details

European Business Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 April 2020

Truong Quang Dung, Lawrence Bryan Bonney, Rajendra P. Adhikari and Morgan P. Miles

This study aims to take a whole-of-chain perspective to explore how entrepreneurial orientation (EO) influences collaborative performance in agri-food value-chains through…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to take a whole-of-chain perspective to explore how entrepreneurial orientation (EO) influences collaborative performance in agri-food value-chains through enhancing the acquisition of knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a survey of 233 actors, including farmers, intermediaries and retailers in one beef cattle value-chain in the Central Highlands, Vietnam. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypotheses.

Findings

The actors’ level of EO within a value-chain is positively associated with collaborative performance within the beef value-chain. Additionally, knowledge acquisition partially mediates the relationship between EO and collaborative performance.

Research limitations/implications

Generalizability is limited because of sampling constraints.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study of EO from a whole-of-chain perspective in agri-food value-chains in an emerging economy and has implications for policymakers and agri-food marketers.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 December 2019

Wade Arnold, Danny Arnold, Alain Neher and Morgan P. Miles

This paper aims to develop and psychometrically assess an individual’s perception of their work unit’s psychological sense of community (PSOCw) scale. This new scale is…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop and psychometrically assess an individual’s perception of their work unit’s psychological sense of community (PSOCw) scale. This new scale is designed to capture the unique characteristics of a contemporary work unit that might include current practices such as hot-desking and workers located in physically separate locations.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops and then psychometrically accesses a new scale designed to better capture the psychological sense of community in a contemporary work unit.

Findings

The managerial implications for the PSOCw scale that is a psychometrically sound measure of work engagement, civility and collegiality in a work unit allow managers to audit a work unit based on these three dimensions and then take corrective actions to enhance the work unit’s sense of community.

Originality/value

The present study adapts previous work on PSOCw to a contemporary work environment where members of a work unit are often in physically separate locations and largely connect virtually.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Morgan P. Miles and Jenny Darroch

The paper aims to explore how large firms might leverage entrepreneurial marketing processes to gain and renew competitive advantage.

Downloads
7729

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore how large firms might leverage entrepreneurial marketing processes to gain and renew competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies past research on entrepreneurial marketing and entrepreneurship with examples from a long‐term case study of firms in New Zealand, Sweden, the UK, and the USA to illustrate how entrepreneurial marketing processes can be strategically employed by large firms to create or discover, assess, and exploit entrepreneurial opportunities more effectively and efficiently.

Findings

The paper offers insight into how large firms leverage entrepreneurial marketing processes to gain advantage. The findings suggest that, in free and open markets, entrepreneurial marketing processes can be strategically employed to create superior value for the firm's customers and owners.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the work of both academics working at the marketing/entrepreneurship interface and executives seeking to leverage marketing to create competitive advantage.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 40 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Morgan P. Miles, Huibert de Vries, Geoff Harrison, Martin Bliemel, Saskia de Klerk and Chick J. Kasouf

The purpose of this paper is to address the role of accelerators as authentic learning-based entrepreneurial training programs. Accelerators facilitate the development and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the role of accelerators as authentic learning-based entrepreneurial training programs. Accelerators facilitate the development and assessment of entrepreneurial competencies in nascent entrepreneurs through the process of creating a start-up venture.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data from applicants and participants of four start-accelerators are used to explore the linkages between accelerators and the elements of authentic learning. Authentic learning processes are then mapped onto the start-up processes that occur within the accelerators.

Findings

Accelerators take in nascent entrepreneurs and work to create start-ups. This activity develops the participants’ entrepreneurial competencies and facilitates authentic self-reflection.

Research limitations/implications

This study explores how accelerators can be useful as authentic learning platforms for the development of entrepreneurial competencies. Limitations include perceptual measures and the inability to conduct paired sampling.

Practical implications

Entrepreneurship training is studied through the lens of authentic learning activities that occur within an accelerator. Participants develop and assess their mastery of and interest in entrepreneurship through tasks, exposure to experts and mentors, peer learning, and assessments such as pitching to investors at Demo Day.

Originality/value

This paper reports on the authentic learning processes and its usefulness in competency development and self-appraisal by accelerators participants. The opportunity for competency development and self-appraisal by nascent entrepreneurs before escalating their commitment to a start-up may be an accelerator’s raison d’être.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Morgan P. Miles, John B. White and Linda S. Munilla

Explores the adoption of strategic planning techniques by agribusiness, specifically agricultural co‐operatives. Offers implications for policy. A survey was sent to 345…

Downloads
2997

Abstract

Explores the adoption of strategic planning techniques by agribusiness, specifically agricultural co‐operatives. Offers implications for policy. A survey was sent to 345 co‐operatives listed in the US Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Cooperative Service’s Directory of Farmer Cooperatives. Co‐operatives have widely adopted many of the sophisticated strategic planning techniques such as environmental analysis, core competences and SWOT analysis.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 99 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Morgan P. Miles and John B. White

This paper seeks to offer an alternative perspective to the quality of life (QOL) philosophy that has been embraced by the marketing discipline. It is proposed that firms…

Downloads
1820

Abstract

This paper seeks to offer an alternative perspective to the quality of life (QOL) philosophy that has been embraced by the marketing discipline. It is proposed that firms which seek to maximize QOL may violate their responsibilities to their owners and other stakeholders.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 32 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2007

Morgan P. Miles, W.W. Kirkley and Jenny Darroch

Much of the information for this case was taken from interviews by the first and second authors with Cindy and John Buell at Mexicali Fresh, taken directly from the…

Abstract

Much of the information for this case was taken from interviews by the first and second authors with Cindy and John Buell at Mexicali Fresh, taken directly from the Buell’s Mexicali Fresh Business Plan, and updated information from their blog posted on http://mexigrill.blogspot.com. In addition, background for this case was provided by Stowers (2005).

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Morgan P. Miles, C. David Shepherd, Jacob M. Rose and Mark Dibben

While collegiality is often discussed and touted as a critical aspect of academia, there is little research that empirically examines collegiality in university business…

Abstract

Purpose

While collegiality is often discussed and touted as a critical aspect of academia, there is little research that empirically examines collegiality in university business schools. One cause of the paucity of research is the lack of a reliable scale to measure collegiality (Sabharwal, 2011). The purpose of this paper is to develop a scale that measures collegiality at the departmental level for university faculty, and then uses it to understand the implications of collegiality within an academic department within a business school.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study uses a scale development process consisting of: defining the domain of the construct; item generation; and psychometric assessment of the scale’s reliability and validity. Items were adapted for a university business school context from Shah (2011) and Seigel and Miner-Rubino (2009). The scale was administrated using a convenience non-random sample design drawn from active marketing and entrepreneurship academics who subscribe to the American Marketing Association’s ELMAR and the Academy of Management’s ENTRE list-serves.

Findings

The faculty collegiality scale (FCS) was found to exhibit sound psychometric properties in this study. The study found that assessments of department-level collegiality are associated with budgets, performance evaluation processes, and workload allocations. In addition, factors from the FCS mediate the relationships between institutional variables and work satisfaction, which indicate that collegiality is an important determinant of work satisfaction in a contemporary university environment.

Originality/value

The FCS developed in the present study offers business school academics and administrators a glimpse into the dimensions of what the marketing and entrepreneurship academics perceive makes a good colleague – one that provides professional and social support and is trustworthy; does not engage in politics, positioning, or rent-seeking to advantage their own situation; and that contributes to the well-being of the students, the department, the discipline and the university. In addition, the present study found that the FCS was related to budgets, performance evaluation processes, and faculty workloads.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000