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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Morgan P. Miles, Martie-Louise Verreynne, Andrew McAuley and Kevin Hammond

The purpose of this paper is to explore how universities attempt to balance meeting their traditional mission of education, research and community engagement while…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how universities attempt to balance meeting their traditional mission of education, research and community engagement while remaining economically sustainable.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted in 2014 of university executives and found that universities in Australia are rapidly transitioning from public supported institutions to an organizational form much more like social enterprise, with all of the organizational, marketing and ethical ramifications.

Findings

Australian universities were found to be focused on maintaining financial viability and that the most significant source of future revenue for Australian universities is perceived to be from international students.

Originality/value

The findings have tremendous public policy and ethical implications – suggesting a shift in the classification of university education from what was generally considered a public good to what is increasingly perceived as a private good in the contemporary market place, with the increasing importance of international students.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2021

Alain Neher, Alfred Wong and Morgan P. Miles

This study aims to explore if corporations that publicly disclose more information about their managerial values are also more organizationally authentic in enacting these values.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore if corporations that publicly disclose more information about their managerial values are also more organizationally authentic in enacting these values.

Design/methodology/approach

A maturity model of managerial values is used that ordinally ranks a corporation’s level of managerial values enactment using corporate annual reports. The samples of corporations’ corporate reports are qualitatively content analyzed, and the outcomes are statistically tested.

Findings

The findings indicate that as an organization voluntarily discloses more information about its corporate values, it tends to be more likely to enact their espoused values, and their corporation’s level of organizational authenticity increases.

Originality/value

This study suggests an approach to benchmark a corporation’s level of organizational authenticity using public information, and by doing so, contributes to both policy and practice by offering a framework to compare organizational authenticity between public corporations by their sector, size or the age of the corporation.

Details

European Business Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2020

Truong Quang Dung, Lawrence Bryan Bonney, Rajendra P. Adhikari and Morgan P. Miles

This study aims to take a whole-of-chain perspective to explore how entrepreneurial orientation (EO) influences collaborative performance in agri-food value-chains through…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to take a whole-of-chain perspective to explore how entrepreneurial orientation (EO) influences collaborative performance in agri-food value-chains through enhancing the acquisition of knowledge.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a survey of 233 actors, including farmers, intermediaries and retailers in one beef cattle value-chain in the Central Highlands, Vietnam. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypotheses.

Findings

The actors’ level of EO within a value-chain is positively associated with collaborative performance within the beef value-chain. Additionally, knowledge acquisition partially mediates the relationship between EO and collaborative performance.

Research limitations/implications

Generalizability is limited because of sampling constraints.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study of EO from a whole-of-chain perspective in agri-food value-chains in an emerging economy and has implications for policymakers and agri-food marketers.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2019

Wade Arnold, Danny Arnold, Alain Neher and Morgan P. Miles

This paper aims to develop and psychometrically assess an individual’s perception of their work unit’s psychological sense of community (PSOCw) scale. This new scale is…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop and psychometrically assess an individual’s perception of their work unit’s psychological sense of community (PSOCw) scale. This new scale is designed to capture the unique characteristics of a contemporary work unit that might include current practices such as hot-desking and workers located in physically separate locations.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops and then psychometrically accesses a new scale designed to better capture the psychological sense of community in a contemporary work unit.

Findings

The managerial implications for the PSOCw scale that is a psychometrically sound measure of work engagement, civility and collegiality in a work unit allow managers to audit a work unit based on these three dimensions and then take corrective actions to enhance the work unit’s sense of community.

Originality/value

The present study adapts previous work on PSOCw to a contemporary work environment where members of a work unit are often in physically separate locations and largely connect virtually.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Morgan P. Miles, Huibert de Vries, Geoff Harrison, Martin Bliemel, Saskia de Klerk and Chick J. Kasouf

The purpose of this paper is to address the role of accelerators as authentic learning-based entrepreneurial training programs. Accelerators facilitate the development and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the role of accelerators as authentic learning-based entrepreneurial training programs. Accelerators facilitate the development and assessment of entrepreneurial competencies in nascent entrepreneurs through the process of creating a start-up venture.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data from applicants and participants of four start-accelerators are used to explore the linkages between accelerators and the elements of authentic learning. Authentic learning processes are then mapped onto the start-up processes that occur within the accelerators.

Findings

Accelerators take in nascent entrepreneurs and work to create start-ups. This activity develops the participants’ entrepreneurial competencies and facilitates authentic self-reflection.

Research limitations/implications

This study explores how accelerators can be useful as authentic learning platforms for the development of entrepreneurial competencies. Limitations include perceptual measures and the inability to conduct paired sampling.

Practical implications

Entrepreneurship training is studied through the lens of authentic learning activities that occur within an accelerator. Participants develop and assess their mastery of and interest in entrepreneurship through tasks, exposure to experts and mentors, peer learning, and assessments such as pitching to investors at Demo Day.

Originality/value

This paper reports on the authentic learning processes and its usefulness in competency development and self-appraisal by accelerators participants. The opportunity for competency development and self-appraisal by nascent entrepreneurs before escalating their commitment to a start-up may be an accelerator’s raison d’être.

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Abhishek Dwivedi, Morgan Miles, Eddie Oczkowski, Jay Weerawardena, Lester W. Johnson and Dean Wilkie

Relational engagement is offered as a framework to describe how buyers and sellers conduct exchange. Relational engagement is conceptualized as a higher-order construct…

Abstract

Purpose

Relational engagement is offered as a framework to describe how buyers and sellers conduct exchange. Relational engagement is conceptualized as a higher-order construct comprising three dimensions: legal bonds, knowledge exchange and co-production. This paper aims to examine the efficacy of the construct by testing its influence on buyer–perceived seller brand equity.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey of 401 US-based industrial buyers was conducted. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Empirical analysis supports the proposed conceptualization of relational engagement, as well as its influence on seller brand equity through influencing buyer-perceived relationship effectiveness.

Practical implications

Relational engagement offers a template to sellers for engaging organizational buyers. A relational engagement strategy has favorable implications for seller brand equity.

Originality/value

Relational engagement offers a comprehensive strategic perspective on inter-organizational exchange, moving beyond tactical approaches. The framework reflects the continuum of exchange, incorporating transactional-dominant and relationship-dominant forms of inter-organizational marketing practices.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 30 March 2006

Thomas R. McGuire

The oil and gas industry has developed in south Louisiana over the last hundred years, first in the salt domes and coastal marshes, then out onto the Outer Continental…

Abstract

The oil and gas industry has developed in south Louisiana over the last hundred years, first in the salt domes and coastal marshes, then out onto the Outer Continental Shelf, and most recently in the deep and ultradeep waters off the shelf. Communities such as New Iberia and Morgan City have grown with the cyclical industry, experiencing prosperous upturns and difficult downturns. Many of the forces these communities have to contend with are outside their control, including the effects of globalization and corporate restructuring common to advanced capitalism. This paper provides an overview of communities and capitalism in south Louisiana.

Details

Markets and Market Liberalization: Ethnographic Reflections
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-354-9

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Chris Storey and Matthew Hughes

This research attempts to understand the operant resources required for new service development (NSD). It aims to construct a more intricate understanding of how operant…

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Abstract

Purpose

This research attempts to understand the operant resources required for new service development (NSD). It aims to construct a more intricate understanding of how operant resources interact to drive NSD. Specifically, it aims to look at the impact of culture, strategic orientation and NSD capability for number of new services, the success rate of new services and the resulting financial contribution by NSD to overall firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

To investigate these relationships, data were collected from 105 leading UK‐based service firms via a key informant survey. Regression analysis was employed to test the model presented.

Findings

Analysis reveals that a different culture (entrepreneurial culture) is needed to drive the number of new services from that required for a higher success rate (learning culture). A NSD capability has an important role supporting both of these aspects of NSD performance. The quantity and quality of NSD go on to affect the financial contribution made by NSD. A firm's strategic orientation is also found to directly affect contribution. NSD performance is further enabled by the appropriate alignment of culture, capability and strategic orientation.

Research limitations/implications

The results demonstrate that existing research only partially explains NSD performance. The impact of culture, capability and strategic orientation is contingent on how performance is measured. Understanding how different operant resources interweave to deliver NSD will facilitate more informed decision making leading to the effective use of organizational resources.

Practical implications

The results show that there are different pathways to NSD performance depending on existing organizational conditions. Firms with an entrepreneurial culture should employ a Prospector orientation, whereas firms with a learning culture benefit from an Analyzer orientation. Defenders need to build on existing capabilities.

Originality/value

To date no study has assessed the relative effect of culture, strategic orientation and capability on NSD performance. The complex contingency model presented here offers a timely contribution to the theory base underpinning the development of operant resources for NSD.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 47 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Morgan P. Miles and John B. White

This paper seeks to offer an alternative perspective to the quality of life (QOL) philosophy that has been embraced by the marketing discipline. It is proposed that firms…

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1819

Abstract

This paper seeks to offer an alternative perspective to the quality of life (QOL) philosophy that has been embraced by the marketing discipline. It is proposed that firms which seek to maximize QOL may violate their responsibilities to their owners and other stakeholders.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 32 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Morgan P. Miles and Jenny Darroch

The paper aims to explore how large firms might leverage entrepreneurial marketing processes to gain and renew competitive advantage.

Downloads
7729

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore how large firms might leverage entrepreneurial marketing processes to gain and renew competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies past research on entrepreneurial marketing and entrepreneurship with examples from a long‐term case study of firms in New Zealand, Sweden, the UK, and the USA to illustrate how entrepreneurial marketing processes can be strategically employed by large firms to create or discover, assess, and exploit entrepreneurial opportunities more effectively and efficiently.

Findings

The paper offers insight into how large firms leverage entrepreneurial marketing processes to gain advantage. The findings suggest that, in free and open markets, entrepreneurial marketing processes can be strategically employed to create superior value for the firm's customers and owners.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the work of both academics working at the marketing/entrepreneurship interface and executives seeking to leverage marketing to create competitive advantage.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 40 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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