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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2013

Miriam L. Matteson, Elizabeth Schlueter and Morgan Hidy

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the current state of continuing education in management for librarians.

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3363

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the current state of continuing education in management for librarians.

Design/methodology/approach

Directors from public and academic libraries were surveyed to explore their perceptions of the need for and value of management knowledge in librarians.

Findings

The results show that library directors consider a wide range of management areas important for librarians to possess and believe that having above average management knowledge is a significant factor in hiring and promotion decisions. Respondents perceive that applicants for mid to senior positions in libraries are more likely to have average or low levels of management knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations to the study are the small sample and the exclusive focus on library directors. Future research on the need for and value of management knowledge for librarians should also examine the perceptions of early to mid career librarians and should explore associations between employees' levels of management knowledge and promotion and hiring decisions.

Practical implications

Results suggest that librarians who wish to move up professionally would benefit from pursuing continuing education in management. Libraries should look for ways to offer management training to staff through collaborations with other libraries and community organizations. Library and information science education programs should offer strategically designed continuing education in specific areas of management.

Originality/value

This research demonstrates a gap in the field of librarianship in the development of highly knowledgeable, trained managers, and offers some solutions to librarians, library institutions, and schools of library and information science toward closing that gap.

Details

Library Management, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Book part
Publication date: 3 June 2008

Faye Antoniou and Georgios D. Sideridis

The purpose of the present study was to predict reading comprehension, reading interest, and reading efficacy from teaching styles. Participants were 109 students with…

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to predict reading comprehension, reading interest, and reading efficacy from teaching styles. Participants were 109 students with learning disabilities from seven elementary schools in Germany. By use of observational protocols and multilevel random coefficient modeling to account for the multilevel structure of the data, results indicated that: (a) reading comprehension was positively predicted from students’ attitudes and a structured classroom discourse, and negatively by a flexible teaching style, (b) reading interest was positively predicted by a structured and positive climate, and negatively by a discourse that was too guided, and (c) reading efficacy was predicted positively from students’ attitudes and teachers’ fostering, and negatively from teachers’ flexibility, guidance, and structure. Implications of the findings are discussed in the context of creating adaptive classroom climates for learners who have difficulties in learning.

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Personnel Preparation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-59749-274-4

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Anita Zátori

The purpose of the paper was to explore the influence of the experience-centric approach and the concept of co-creation on service design and provision and to analyze the…

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2989

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper was to explore the influence of the experience-centric approach and the concept of co-creation on service design and provision and to analyze the process of on-site experience co-creation between provider and consumer, particularly, how tour providers and tour guides enhance and support the process of co-creation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study reviews the literature on experience-centric approach and value co-creation, discusses personal resources and experience-centric service design as resources for co-creation. It analyzes primary data from 33 interviews and 28 observations of 11 sightseeing tour providers.

Findings

The methods and tools of tour providers’ service design were explored and evaluated whether they fit the criteria of the concept of co-creation and experience-centric approach. The findings show that small-group tour providers use the concept of co-creation to the biggest extent, followed by alternative tour providers. The study also analyzed what types of service designs support a co-creative service provision. Three steps were identified as steps to support and realize experience and value co-creation from the side of the service provider. Based on the empirical results, the attention-involve-make discover (AIM) model was created, which proposes that the process of value and experience co-creation happens by provoking attention, by engaging and involving and, finally, by making consumers to discover.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper lies in the creation of the AIM-model illustrating the on-site co-creation process in the context of guided tours, which can further be tested in other fields and areas.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Helen Lam

The purpose of this paper is to analyse social media issues that give rise to employment-related legal and ethical dilemmas, with reference made to recent case law…

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12082

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse social media issues that give rise to employment-related legal and ethical dilemmas, with reference made to recent case law development, and offer recommendations for employers and employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Prior research, statistical trends, and case laws are reviewed.

Findings

Employers using social media for employment decisions may risk crossing the lines of discrimination, infringement on personal privacy, and/or interference with employees’ concerted activities protected by US law. However, employers not using social media may face negligent hiring and damages for improper employee messages posted. For employees, while social media provides a connection tool, messages posted off-duty and thought to be “private” may still be used as evidence in support of disciplinary actions.

Practical implications

Employers, employees, and their unions must be cognizant of the ethical and legal implications of using social media in the employment context, and the latest developments in the privacy rights, human rights, labour relations rights, and contractual rights. Concerns about power shift need to be addressed.

Social implications

Social media growth has blurred the boundary between work and private lives. With employers able to monitor employees’ social media activities almost at all times, this has implications for the overall power and control. On the other hand, employees may find social media offering another voice channel that can also potentially increase their power to some extent.

Originality/value

Social media is a fast developing area with new case laws emerging regarding its use in the employment context. The paper provides a systemic review of the issues and latest developments.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Rene Arseneault, Nicholous M. Deal and Jean Helms Mills

The purpose of this paper is to answer the question of where the course of the collective efforts in historical research on business and organizations has taken this…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to answer the question of where the course of the collective efforts in historical research on business and organizations has taken this discipline. By raising two key contributions that have sought to reshape the contours of management and organizational history, the authors trace the work of their field since their inception and, in doing so, critique the utility of these typologies as representative of diverse historical knowledge in management and organization studies (MOS).

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on elements of an integrative review that seeks to critically appraise the foundation of knowledge built in a scholarly field, the authors interrogate the historical knowledge that has been (and is being) produced in three leading management and organizational history journals by synthesizing the posture history takes as an object and subject of study in MOS. Over 400 articles were closely examined and categorized using Rowlinson et al.’s (2014) research strategies in organizational history and Maclean et al.’s (2016) four conceptions of history. Then, this research was used to examine the integrity of these two typologies and their practice by management historians.

Findings

The bulk of the work our field has produced mirrors an analytically structured history feel – where “doing history” straddles careful divide between data analysis and narrative construction. Narrating as a conception of history used in organization studies research remains the most subscribed representation of the past. It was found that while some work may fit within these typologies, others especially those considered peripheral of mainstream history are difficult to confine to any one strategy or conception. The authors’ examination also found some potential for a creative synthesis between the two typologies.

Research limitations/implications

Because only three management history journals are used in this analysis, bracketed by the choice of the periodization (between 2016 and 2019 inclusive), this study must not be viewed as being wholly representative of all historical research on business and organizations writ-large.

Practical implications

This research attempts to demonstrate the recent direction management and organizational historians have taken in crafting history. The authors embrace the opportunity to allow for this paper to act as a tool to familiarize a much broader audience to understand what has been constituted as historical research in MOS to-date and is especially useful to those who are already contributing to the field (e.g. doctoral students and junior scholars who have demonstrable interest in taking up historically inspired dissertations, articles, chapters and conference activities).

Originality/value

The research conducted in this article contributes to the debates that have sought to define the scholastic character of management and organizational history. The authors build on recent calls to take part in creating dialogue between and among each other, building on the collective efforts that advance history in both theory and practice.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 22 June 2021

John N. Moye

Abstract

Details

The Psychophysics of Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-113-7

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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2015

Dekar Urumsah

The concept and practice of e-services has become essential in business transactions. Yet there are still many organizations that have not developed e-services optimally…

Abstract

The concept and practice of e-services has become essential in business transactions. Yet there are still many organizations that have not developed e-services optimally. This is especially relevant in the context of Indonesian Airline companies. Therefore, many airline customers in Indonesia are still in doubt about it, or even do not use it. To fill this gap, this study attempts to develop a model for e-services adoption and empirically examines the factors influencing the airlines customers in Indonesia in using e-services offered by the Indonesian airline companies. Taking six Indonesian airline companies as a case example, the study investigated the antecedents of e-services usage of Indonesian airlines. This study further examined the impacts of motivation on customers in using e-services in the Indonesian context. Another important aim of this study was to investigate how ages, experiences and geographical areas moderate effects of e-services usage.

The study adopts a positivist research paradigm with a two-phase sequential mixed method design involving qualitative and quantitative approaches. An initial research model was first developed based on an extensive literature review, by combining acceptance and use of information technology theories, expectancy theory and the inter-organizational system motivation models. A qualitative field study via semi-structured interviews was then conducted to explore the present state among 15 respondents. The results of the interviews were analysed using content analysis yielding the final model of e-services usage. Eighteen antecedent factors hypotheses and three moderating factors hypotheses and 52-item questionnaire were developed. A focus group discussion of five respondents and a pilot study of 59 respondents resulted in final version of the questionnaire.

In the second phase, the main survey was conducted nationally to collect the research data among Indonesian airline customers who had already used Indonesian airline e-services. A total of 819 valid questionnaires were obtained. The data was then analysed using a partial least square (PLS) based structural equation modelling (SEM) technique to produce the contributions of links in the e-services model (22% of all the variances in e-services usage, 37.8% in intention to use, 46.6% in motivation, 39.2% in outcome expectancy, and 37.7% in effort expectancy). Meanwhile, path coefficients and t-values demonstrated various different influences of antecedent factors towards e-services usage. Additionally, a multi-group analysis based on PLS is employed with mixed results. In the final findings, 14 hypotheses were supported and 7 hypotheses were not supported.

The major findings of this study have confirmed that motivation has the strongest contribution in e-services usage. In addition, motivation affects e-services usage both directly and indirectly through intention-to-use. This study provides contributions to the existing knowledge of e-services models, and practical applications of IT usage. Most importantly, an understanding of antecedents of e-services adoption will provide guidelines for stakeholders in developing better e-services and strategies in order to promote and encourage more customers to use e-services. Finally, the accomplishment of this study can be expanded through possible adaptations in other industries and other geographical contexts.

Details

E-services Adoption: Processes by Firms in Developing Nations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-709-7

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Darren W. Dahl and Kamal Smimou

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the perceptions that undergraduate students formed and provides further insight into the relationship between perceived teaching…

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9306

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the perceptions that undergraduate students formed and provides further insight into the relationship between perceived teaching quality (with its descriptors) and student motivation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports the findings from a survey of student perceptions of quality teaching and its interaction with various motivational orientations that students exhibit in higher education. The proposed hypotheses and conceptual model were tested using regression and correlation analyses, as well as analysis of variance from a survey of 271 undergraduate students in programs at two different universities.

Findings

The findings document the explanatory role of various motivations in students' perceptions of teaching quality: correlation analysis found intrinsic motivation to be positively correlated with the perceived teaching quality, while extrinsic motivation was found to be moderately correlated, suggesting that motivational orientation dimensions are influential in students' assessments of their teaching experience in school. Intrinsic motivation with its possible states and factor loadings showed strong positive impact on the teaching quality and students' evaluation, even after accounting for the reputation (general opinion) of the educational institution (or program). Thus, we cannot ignore the value‐added nature of various motivational orientations and their influence upon the perceptions of students. Surprisingly, few differences in perception based on gender, age, and country of birth (ethnicity) were found. Young students (less than 25‐year old) and Canadian‐ and American‐born students exhibited significant negative reactions (difference) to perceived teaching quality; in contrast, female students exhibited positive reactions towards it.

Practical implications

The results presented here will assist researchers, professors, and higher‐education administrators by capitalizing on students' existing intrinsic motivation and understanding the relationship between student perceptions of teaching quality and their degree of motivation to further expand and implement a better quality‐assurance educational system. A viable strategy to enhance and further motivate students extrinsically and intrinsically in their learning will significantly enhance their perceptions.

Originality/value

The article explores for the first time the link between students' motivational orientations and their perceptions about teaching quality.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 37 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Amin Amini

Economic growth, without distributional measures and policies, engenders inequality and concentration. National income may be distributed either through the establishment…

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1806

Abstract

Economic growth, without distributional measures and policies, engenders inequality and concentration. National income may be distributed either through the establishment of a proper welfare system, or by the encouragement of and incentive for economic activities and policies with built‐in distributional factors. The prerequisites for sustainable income distribution are fair distribution of assets, investments and power. The main outcome of the growth‐based developing theories and activities are concentration of production, people and financial and political power. These concentrations are the sources of many problems of both developing and industrialised countries. Although there have been countless studies about development, few have made an attempt to investigate the social and economic interactions of small business with sustainable development. Small business’ contributions to the process of development, in terms of distribution of economic and non‐economic resources, are substantial. This article will explore the economic and political distributional power of small business and their roles in the process of socio‐economic development.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1912

WHILE there is no doubt that the system of issuing books at “net” prices is of great benefit to booksellers, there is also no doubt that, unless care is taken, it is a…

Abstract

WHILE there is no doubt that the system of issuing books at “net” prices is of great benefit to booksellers, there is also no doubt that, unless care is taken, it is a serious drain upon a limited book‐purchasing income. A few years ago the position had become so serious that conferences were held with a view to securing the exemption of Public Libraries from the “net” price. The attempt, as was perhaps to be expected, failed. Since that time, the system has been growing until, at the present time, practically every non‐fictional book worth buying is issued at a “net price.”

Details

New Library World, vol. 14 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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