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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Venkat R. Krishnan

The relationships between moral leadership, transformational, transactional, and laissez‐faire leaderships, and certain outcomes were studied using a sample of 116…

Abstract

The relationships between moral leadership, transformational, transactional, and laissez‐faire leaderships, and certain outcomes were studied using a sample of 116 managers of a large manufacturing organization in eastern India. Results reveal that transformational leadership partially mediates moral leadership’s relationship with follower’s extra effort and satisfaction, and leader’s effectiveness, and it fully mediates moral leadership’s relationship with leader’s power. Based on whether leader’s self‐rating was more than, same as, or less than follower’s rating of leader’s transformational leadership, leader‐follower dyads were classified into three categories – overestimation, agreement, and underestimation. Findings show that moral leadership is lower in overestimation than in agreement, and is lower in agreement than in underestimation. Correlation between moral leadership and power is also the highest in the case of underestimation. Leader’s power, however, does not differ across categories.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2020

Rizqa Anita, Muhammad Rasyid Abdillah and Nor Balkish Zakaria

This study aims to extend the understanding of the role of authentic leadership in encouraging subordinates to become internal whistleblowers. The current study aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to extend the understanding of the role of authentic leadership in encouraging subordinates to become internal whistleblowers. The current study aims to seek whether authentic leadership can encourage internal whistleblowing (IW) through employee controlled motivation for IW and moral courage.

Design/methodology/approach

The samples of this study were 221 employees working at 26 government organizations in one of the provinces located on Sumatera Island, Indonesia. Based on the cross-sectional survey method, this study used partial least square-structural equation modeling analysis with SmartPLS 3 software to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The result revealed that employee controlled motivation for whistleblowing and moral courage significantly mediates the effect of authentic leadership toward IW. This result also indicates that the two mediating variables in this study fully mediate the effect of authentic leadership toward IW.

Practical implications

This study highlights the critical role played by leaders in encouraging subordinates to IW in the workplace. The role of an authentic leader will have positively affected enhancing IW by employees, which has significant implications for the organization that particularly in manage organization wrongdoing in terms of eliminating or preventing unethical practice.

Originality/value

Theoretically, the current study extends the understanding of the mechanism underlying the relationship between authentic leadership and IW. This study proposes employee controlled motivation for IW and moral courage as the new mediator variables to explain how and why authentic leadership may encourage IW. Empirically, the current study chooses the Indonesian Government as a context that rarely conducts in the prior study.

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International Journal of Ethics and Systems, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9369

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Min Wu

Moral leadership, as an important element of paternalistic leadership, can be traced back to the cultural tradition of Confucianism. High morality has been expected to be…

Abstract

Purpose

Moral leadership, as an important element of paternalistic leadership, can be traced back to the cultural tradition of Confucianism. High morality has been expected to be demonstrated by leaders since ancient times in China. In modern Chinese organizations, moral leadership still plays an important role. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the underlying mechanisms of moral leadership functions by examining the mediating and interaction effects.

Design/methodology/approach

Data of 370 dyads were collected in mainland China. SPSS 17.0 and Amos 6.0 were used to test the mediating and interaction effects.

Findings

Trust‐in‐supervisor and two dimensions of psychological empowerment, including meaning and self‐determination, were found to mediate the relationship between moral leadership and work performance. The results supported the interaction effect of moral and benevolent leadership and rejected the interaction effect of moral and authoritarian leadership on trust‐in‐supervisor.

Originality/value

By probing the mediating and interaction effects, the paper advances our knowledge of the psychological mechanisms of moral leadership effectiveness in the Chinese context. A discussion of the implications for both researchers and practitioners is provided.

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2008

Jacob Easley

The purpose of this paper is to identify and explore the factors and conditions of moral leadership that affect the potential for teacher retention among Alternative Route…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and explore the factors and conditions of moral leadership that affect the potential for teacher retention among Alternative Route Certification teachers.

Design/methodology/approach

Alternative Route Certification teachers participated in a single focus group. Participants' dialogues were recorded and analyzed for themes. These themes were triangulated with external data from a related study.

Findings

Not only are Alternative Route Certification teachers drawn to the profession due to their own moral ideals, findings reveal that they are simultaneously responsive to principals' moral leadership. The praxis of moral leadership is expressed through relationships between principals and teachers and is defined by dispositions as well as actions. Three themes from this study define moral leadership as: a respect for teachers as professionals; relationships with teachers; and focusing on the right things.

Practical implications

This paper lays out a theoretical framework and low cost implications for the development of a leadership praxis toward sustaining teacher retention, particularly among Alternative Certification Route teachers working in urban schools.

Originality/value

Research on Alternative Route Certification teacher retention is underdeveloped, at best. This project adds to this body of research by exploring the specific traits, attitudes, dispositions, and actions that define the moral leadership needed to foster teacher retention.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Charmine E.J. Härtel and Deshani B. Ganegoda

In an age where morality requires economic justification, it is a compelling task to explicate the deeper affecting implications of moral judgment than its mere financial…

Abstract

In an age where morality requires economic justification, it is a compelling task to explicate the deeper affecting implications of moral judgment than its mere financial costs. In this chapter, we explore the emotional, behavioral, and cognitive ramifications of moral leadership at both the individual and macro organizational levels; specifically, by summoning literature on leadership, affect, and organizational justice to build a conceptual model of affect and interactional justice in moral leadership. The aim of the model is to extend current theoretical frameworks and highlight the important ramifications that moral decision-making has on employee and organizational welfare including that of the decision maker. The chapter concludes with a call for research comparing moral and immoral leadership in terms of different influence and strategy processes adopted by leaders and their followers’ attributions, emotions, attitudes, and behaviors.

Details

Emotions, Ethics and Decision-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-941-8

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Book part
Publication date: 30 April 2019

S. J. Oswald A. J. Mascarenhas

Leadership cannot exist without followership. The phenomenon of direction and guidance, coaching and mentoring, has at least three components: the leader, leadership, and…

Abstract

Executive Summary

Leadership cannot exist without followership. The phenomenon of direction and guidance, coaching and mentoring, has at least three components: the leader, leadership, and followers. With each component, the composition of purpose and goals, ethics and morals, rights and duties, and skills and talents is critically important. While the leader is the central and the most important part of the leadership phenomenon, followers are important and necessary factors in the leadership equation. Leaders and followers are engaged in a common enterprise: they are dependent upon each other; their fortunes rise and fall together. Relational qualities define the leadership–followership phenomenon. A major component of such a relationship is how the leaders create and communicate new meaning to followers, perceive themselves relative to followers, and how the followers, in turn, perceive their leader. This mutual perception has serious ethical and moral implications – how leader uses or abuses power, and how followers are augmented or diminished. This chapter features the essentials of ethical and moral, corporate executive leadership in two parts: (1) the Theory of Ethical and Moral Leadership and (2) the Art of Ethical and Moral Leadership. Several contemporary cases such as inspirational leadership of JRD Tata, Crisis of Leadership at Infosys, and Headhunting for CEOs will illustrate our discussions on the ethics and morals of corporate executive leadership.

Details

Corporate Ethics for Turbulent Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-192-2

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2020

Zhigang Song and Qinxuan Gu

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between exchange ideology and employee creativity based on the social exchange perspective. It also attempts to examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between exchange ideology and employee creativity based on the social exchange perspective. It also attempts to examine the mediating role of perceived shared leadership and the moderating role of vertical moral leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

Multilevel and multisource data were collected from 56 research and development (R&D) teams with 306 employees. Hypotheses were tested with multilevel path analysis.

Findings

The authors found that exchange ideology was negatively related to both perceived shared leadership and employee creativity, and perceived shared leadership mediated the relationship between exchange ideology and employee creativity. Moreover, we revealed that vertical moral leadership buffered the negative relationship between employee exchange ideology and perceived shared leadership and also the indirect effect of exchange ideology on employee creativity via perceived shared leadership.

Research limitations/implications

Organizations should select employees with a relatively weak exchange ideology when forming teams to conduct creative tasks. Moreover, team leaders should make great efforts to facilitate the development of shared leadership among team members while to be a moral leader.

Originality/value

This study extends creativity literature by investigating the effect of exchange ideology on employee creativity. It also sheds lights on leadership research by examining the mediating role of perceived shared leadership and the moderating role of vertical moral leadership.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 58 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

William D. Greenfield

The genesis of the moral leadership concept in educational administration and examples of studies exploring this idea during the 1979‐2003 period are discussed. The author…

Abstract

The genesis of the moral leadership concept in educational administration and examples of studies exploring this idea during the 1979‐2003 period are discussed. The author recommends more contextually sensitive descriptive studies with a focus on the social relations among school leaders and others, giving particular attention, in a phenomenological sense, to the meanings, perspectives, and espoused purposes of school leaders’ actions, social relationships, and interpersonal orientations.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Spencer J. Maxcy and Stephen J. Caldas

An increasingly popular argument proposes that the problems inpublic schooling may be solved through stronger, more morallyimaginative leadership. School administrators…

Abstract

An increasingly popular argument proposes that the problems in public schooling may be solved through stronger, more morally imaginative leadership. School administrators ought to set forth a vision growing out of this moral responsibility, and may be trained to utilise moral imagination in directing teachers and students towards certain moral visions. A critique of the argument is presented and alternative (and conflicting) meanings of “moral imagination” surveyed. Four models of moral imagination are located: as discovery; as moral authority; as faculty of mind, and as super science. It is argued that each of these conceptions has inherent difficulties. The logical relationship of these views is explored. The notion of “school leadership” is traced in the literature as it has been attached to “moral imagination”. The work of W. Greenfield is examined and a philosophy of school administration, with certain assumptions, regarding values and authority, that reveal key difficulties for the unfettered use of “moral imagination” in school administration, is found. It is concluded that “moral imagination” ought to be replaced with “critical imagination”, coupled with “democratic value deliberation” and by so doing a richer leadership will result, leading to the empowerment of teachers and a fuller serving of the public good.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Gail C. Furman

This article proposes the concept of an ethic of community to complement and extend other ethical frames used in education (e.g. the ethics of justice, critique, and…

Abstract

This article proposes the concept of an ethic of community to complement and extend other ethical frames used in education (e.g. the ethics of justice, critique, and care). Proceeding from the traditional definition of ethics as the study of moral duty and obligation, ethic of community is defined as the moral responsibility to engage in communal processes as educators pursue the moral purposes of their work and address the ongoing challenges of daily life and work in schools. The ethic of community thus centers the communal over the individual as the primary locus of moral agency in schools. The usefulness of the ethic of community in regard to achieving the moral purposes of schooling is illustrated with the example of social justice. The author concludes that the ethic of community is a vehicle that can synthesize much of the current work on leadership practices related to social justice and other moral purposes of educational leadership.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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