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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Michael Stoller

To trace patterns of collection development expenditures between 1994 and 2004 among Association of Research Libraries' (ARL) largest and smallest public and private…

1416

Abstract

Purpose

To trace patterns of collection development expenditures between 1994 and 2004 among Association of Research Libraries' (ARL) largest and smallest public and private academic libraries, to identify the impact of serial inflation, the emergence of electronic resources and changes in the monographic market upon the buying patterns of the largest and smallest academic libraries, public and private, in the USA and Canada.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysis of the annual ARL statistics for collection development expenditures between 1994 and 2004, focusing upon the ten largest public, ten largest private, ten smallest public and ten smallest private academic ARL libraries.

Findings

Libraries have largely responded to the revolutionary changes of the last decade very conservatively, retaining their commitment to monographic acquisitions and to their paper collections even as they have built new, electronic libraries.

Research limitations/implications

ARL statistics present a complex picture, and libraries are not consistent in the manner in which they report their activities. The methodology does not seek a statistically precise model but seeks only to lay out a useful snapshot of library collecting patterns over the last ten years.

Practical implications

Academic libraries have not yet fully confronted the issues raised by changes in scholarly communication over the last decade and still have many difficult decisions ahead of the, as patterns of the last ten years may be difficult or inappropriate to sustain.

Originality/value

Provides a picture of collection development patterns of the largest and smallest ARL academic libaries that complements ARL's own analysis, which is based on median values.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1997

Blaise Cronin, Herbert Snyder and Helen Atkins

A recurrent criticism of commercial citation indexes is their failure to cover citations found in monographic literature. There exists the possibility that citation‐based…

1425

Abstract

A recurrent criticism of commercial citation indexes is their failure to cover citations found in monographic literature. There exists the possibility that citation‐based surveys of scholarly communication and influence which ignore references in monographs may produce partial results. The study examined the scholarly literature of sociology. Tens of thousands of references from monographs and leading academic journals were analysed. The relative rankings of authors who were highly cited in the monographic literature did not change in the journal literature of the same period. There is, however, only a small overlap between the most highly cited authors based on the journal sample and those based on the monograph sample. The lack of correlation suggests that there may be two distinct populations of highly cited authors.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 53 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

YLVA LINDHOLM‐ROMANTSCHUK and JULIAN WARNER

The principal aim of this study is to examine the transmission of ideas across time in disciplines selected from the humanities and social sciences. Citation analysis is…

Abstract

The principal aim of this study is to examine the transmission of ideas across time in disciplines selected from the humanities and social sciences. Citation analysis is used to trace the diffusion of ideas as they are embodied in monographic publications. The study is part of a developing research programme and is intended to establish a framework to inform future developments. Four specific hypotheses are developed and tested. They are concerned with: the relative impact of monographs and journal articles produced within a discipline; the distinction between core and non‐core group monographs; the correlation between the reception and intellectual survival of a monograph; and the comparative level of impact of monographic and journal article publication by a single author. It is concluded that the presence of core or elite groups can be perceived in all aspects of the study. The validity of the methodologies employed is strengthened by the sharp distinctions between groups of monographs and of authors revealed by the analysis of data. Further analysis is needed to explore intra‐ and inter‐disciplinary diffusion of ideas over time in greater depth.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 52 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Melissa Gasparotto

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the bibliography citations from dissertations submitted to the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Rutgers University from the…

378

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the bibliography citations from dissertations submitted to the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Rutgers University from the ten-year period of 2003-2012. The objective of the analysis is to aid in collection development decisions, facilitate outreach to graduate students in the department and to understand possible changes in disciplinary methodologies and research needs in the field over the last decade.

Design/methodology/approach

Descriptive research design was used for the study. Bibliography citation data were extracted from all dissertations submitted to the Department of Spanish and Portuguese from the period 2003-2012. Statistical analysis was performed on the collected citation data, and conclusions were drawn from the results.

Findings

The study demonstrates that, despite the oft-mentioned “decline of the monograph”, the monograph remains very heavily used by PhD students in Spanish and Portuguese at Rutgers University, and that monographs continue to be cited at significantly higher rates and for longer periods than journal articles. This holds true for the humanities dissertations in Spanish literature as well as social science dissertations in Spanish linguistics. The study further finds that open access journals in Spanish literature are cited more frequently than closed access journals.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that it is more user-responsive to allocate retrospective collections funds for filling in monographic gaps than journal coverage gaps, as journal articles are cited less frequently and for shorter periods, while monographs are cited more frequently and for slightly longer periods after they are published. The findings also suggest that current monographic expenditures be maintained or augmented to continue serving current and future graduate student research needs in Spanish and Portuguese. Further, the large number of monograph chapters cited suggests that book chapter document delivery services could be an important addition to a library’s suite of services if it is not already provided.

Originality/value

This paper is the first analysis of Spanish and Portuguese dissertations conducted at Rutgers University and provides important contextual information for meeting the research needs of graduate students in the department through collection development and related services. Other research has documented that dissertation citation patterns are at least partially predictive of faculty citation patterns, making the findings of this study applicable to serving faculty research and collections needs in the department, as well. The findings are relevant to collection development, access services and librarian-department liaison relationships.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Glenn S. McGuigan, Gregory A. Crawford and Jessica L. Kubiske

This research used a sample of titles drawn from the Harvard Business School Core Collection to examine the holdings of libraries of institutions offering the Master of…

761

Abstract

This research used a sample of titles drawn from the Harvard Business School Core Collection to examine the holdings of libraries of institutions offering the Master of Business Administration degree within the state of Pennsylvania. Of  the  82 books selected from the Core Collection, the average number of books owned by the libraries was 25.3 (30.8 percent). In addition, the results showed that those libraries supporting AACSB accredited MBA programs owned significantly more of the sample of titles (37.06, 45.2 percent) than did libraries supporting non‐AACSB accredited programs (16.9, 20.6 percent).

Details

Collection Building, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Scott Stebelman

Examines the use of Choice, a selection tool for academic libraries, at the Gelman Library at George Washington University, Washington DC. Describes a survey into the…

1004

Abstract

Examines the use of Choice, a selection tool for academic libraries, at the Gelman Library at George Washington University, Washington DC. Describes a survey into the value of Choice, the methods used and the results obtained. Looks into issues such as publisher group, acquisition of series titles and the frequency with which individual publishers were cited. Concludes that despite its limitations Choice is the best source an academic library can use in maintaining the acquisition program.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 July 2009

Kristi Jensen

The purpose of this paper is to describe how online survey tools can be utilized to gather input and feedback from faculty related to monographic collection decisions to…

1693

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how online survey tools can be utilized to gather input and feedback from faculty related to monographic collection decisions to evaluate current and guide future decision making.

Design/methodology/approach

The use of an online survey tool for a particular collection development project is described and results of the survey are analyzed.

Findings

It is found that online survey tools are an easy and valuable tool for gathering direct feedback from faculty and provide opportunities to engage faculty in conversations about a wide range of scholarly communications issues.

Research limitations/implications

Online survey tools provide one means of evaluating collection development decisions that should be utilized in conjunction with other methodologies, e.g. circulation studies. Online survey tools can be utilized to allow faculty to recommend items for immediate purchase but could also be used to study faculty reactions to purchases that have already been made.

Originality/value

The process and procedure outlined could be used by collection development librarians to evaluate current and historic collection development decisions.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Linda Klimczyk and Marsha Tate

Describes Penn State University Library′s use of the OCLC CAT MEand CAT ME Plus for batch searching at off‐peak hours to resolveovercrowding of OCLC dedicated terminals…

Abstract

Describes Penn State University Library′s use of the OCLC CAT ME and CAT ME Plus for batch searching at off‐peak hours to resolve overcrowding of OCLC dedicated terminals. Summarises the CAT ME and CAT ME Plus functions used, time savings calculations, and searching techniques. Concludes that CAT ME and CAT ME Plus have enabled maximum efficiency from dedicated OCLC terminals, more efficient use of staff time and have become an invaluable tool for bibliographic searching.

Details

OCLC Micro, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 8756-5196

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1985

Jill Newby

Individual numbers of a serial title that are monographic in nature are sent to the Catalog Dept. for cataloging as analytics. Our Cataloging Micro Enhancer process works…

Abstract

Individual numbers of a serial title that are monographic in nature are sent to the Catalog Dept. for cataloging as analytics. Our Cataloging Micro Enhancer process works well with the analytics cataloging procedure since label production isn't required for analytics. The process also allows a backlog of “no copy” (i.e., no bibliographic record found) search keys to be maintained on the data disk for further searching.

Details

OCLC Micro, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 8756-5196

Article
Publication date: 18 November 2013

Candice Dahl

As patron-driven acquisition (PDA) becomes increasingly popular we must consider its impact on academic libraries and their communities of researchers. Of particular…

818

Abstract

Purpose

As patron-driven acquisition (PDA) becomes increasingly popular we must consider its impact on academic libraries and their communities of researchers. Of particular interest is how successfully e-book PDA programs serve humanities scholars, as traditional representations of their information-seeking behaviours suggest that e-books are largely unsuitable for their needs. More recent investigations into the research practices of humanists suggest that this perception is not completely accurate, making it important to assess the potential fit between PDA and the humanities based on available information. This paper seeks to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on published investigations into the information-seeking behaviours of humanities scholars, e-books in libraries, and e-book PDA programs the author determined ways in which e-book PDA programs intersect with the needs and practices of humanists, as well as the points of disconnect between them.

Findings

Humanities scholars demonstrate many information-seeking behaviours that suggest they can be well-served by e-book PDA programs. Their growing acceptance of electronic resources, significant reliance on the monographic form, heavy use of library catalogues, and the increasingly interdisciplinary nature of their work mean that e-books and PDA programs can be viewed as compatible with their needs even though print remains their preferred format.

Originality/value

While some note the number and monetary value of humanities titles purchased through PDA, no authors have assessed the nature of PDA programs in relation to the information-seeking behaviours of humanities scholars. Such analysis is necessary to get an accurate picture of how well the humanities will be served by PDA.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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