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Article

Monika L. Hudson, Keith O. Hunter and Pier C. Rogers

Take the word “research,” combine it with the words “experiences around hair,” and you inevitably get a personal story. Whether it’s concerns about too much hair…

Abstract

Purpose

Take the word “research,” combine it with the words “experiences around hair,” and you inevitably get a personal story. Whether it’s concerns about too much hair, complaints about one’s lack of hair, or the ability of hair to intimidate or convey authority, questions related to hair appear to provoke passionate responses in the form of narratives. The authors believed “hair” stories would provide a unique method for examining employment realities in nonprofit and public sector workplaces. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Attendees at the 2009 Association for Research on Nonprofit Organizations and Voluntary Action (ARNOVA) conference were invited to a symposium discussing what “hair” might indicate about the lived experiences of individuals employed in nonprofit and public sector workplaces. A participatory action research methodology was used to engage 24 academics and practitioners in structured small group conversations about workplace hair-related image management issues. A storytelling framework was used to guide the content analysis of the 305 narratives generated by two focus groups.

Findings

The interview questions were literal ones, yet the responses that were elicited were figurative. As the process unfolded, it became clear the focus group participants had to tell their own individual stories, in their own way, before they could answer the research questions. Hence, the storytelling dimension became a critical component of this research as a vehicle for conveying the power behind what may have initially appeared to be a simple set of questions and answers.

Research limitations/implications

Selection bias in this study was unavoidable, given the voluntary nature of participation and the transparency of the study’s purpose. Given the chosen research approach, the project findings may also lack generalizability. However, since the so-called “subjects” of the investigation are the same persons found in sector workplaces, there is no way to avoid this limitation in any related assessment.

Practical implications

This project allowed for a new understanding of how the direct and literal approach often used by social scientists to investigate the impact of attitudes and perceptions on social outcomes might best be replaced or augmented by methods that uncover the ways in which subjects frame the effects under examination within the context of their personal experiences.

Social implications

One’s appearance takes on professional and, often, political ramifications whether the individuals involved desire this or not. Ironically, one’s ability to appear more casual may be one of the benefits of working in the nonprofit or public sectors as a means of connecting to constituents and stakeholders. However, given the need to serve multiple and competing audiences, this ability to identify and connect with others may have unintended consequences that may not be experienced in the private sector, where stakeholders may have a more unified set of goals.

Originality/value

This project focused on a relatively under-researched audience and subject: hair and image management. Each day, individuals make a choice about their appearance, which includes their hair. For those working in the nonprofit and public sectors, especially women and people of color, there appear to be implicit areas of concern that manifest themselves in the workplace, many of which were identified through this research.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

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Case study

Monika Hudson and Keith O. Hunter

When do you throw it all away? The first senior female in a male-dominated business school decides it all comes down to a question of principle – and maybe a few others…

Abstract

Synopsis

When do you throw it all away? The first senior female in a male-dominated business school decides it all comes down to a question of principle – and maybe a few others. What is the best balance between her responsibilities to students, family, and the next generation of female leaders? Can she both be true to herself and compromise? What factors should influence this decision? This case brings together questions about power and influence, rational decision-making, leadership, and the intra and inter-personal responsibilities of organizational “firsts.” Further, issues related to a university's effort to better compete within the global higher education marketplace, provide a valuable opportunity to explore institutional approaches to promoting diversity, inclusion, and cultural competency.

Research methodology

This case, which was developed from primary sources, highlights the array of competing objectives and personal and political tensions involved in university administration.

Relevant courses and levels

This case was designed for graduate students in Masters of Public Administration, Masters of Business Administration, Masters of Education in Organizational Leadership, or similar graduate degrees that include significant management and leadership content. Students working with this case should have already completed foundational courses in topics such as organizational management, public policy, leadership, strategic human resources management, or their equivalents within their respective programs of study. Virtually all of the issues raised by this case address core themes, concepts, theses, and theories associated with an accredited graduate program in educational management, business or public administration.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Keywords

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Case study

Monika Hudson and Frank Ohara

The family matriarch dies without a written succession plan, leaving her children to determine how to cope with the continuity of the family’s expanding food empire. This…

Abstract

Synopsis

The family matriarch dies without a written succession plan, leaving her children to determine how to cope with the continuity of the family’s expanding food empire. This becomes increasingly difficult when one of the siblings wants to incur expensive, yet required, renovations to the family’s original restaurant. The situation is further complicated by the fact that the two older siblings are focused on corporate expansion efforts, while the youngest is trying to demonstrate her competence in running the family’s historical restaurant. A central focus of the case is to understand and identify effective strategies that should guide the firm-related choices each sibling makes.

Research methodology

This case, which was developed from field interviews and personal experience, highlights the array of competing financial and personal objectives and tensions involved in a family business. An interactive tool allows users to conduct multiple scenario analyses to determine if the company’s manufacturing expansion goals can be achieved while simultaneously honoring the family’s restaurant roots.

Relevant courses and levels

This case was designed specifically for the undergraduate junior or senior business or economics student who has already taken basic finance, economics, strategy, entrepreneurship, or psychology courses. Typically, by the third or fourth year of study in a traditional undergraduate program, virtually all of the core themes, concepts, theses, and theories associated with the case have been addressed in previous business or economics coursework.

Theoretical bases

The case provides an intentional opportunity for students to demonstrate their emerging financial analysis competencies, while concurrently synthesizing the so-called “soft” skills associated with rational decision making, organizational behavior analysis, business strategy, entrepreneurship, and negotiations.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Abstract

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article

Divesh Kumar and Monika Sheoran

This study aims to unfold the factors which influence the sustainability innovation (SUSINNOV) adoption initiatives taken by the hoteliers in India. Also, an empirical…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to unfold the factors which influence the sustainability innovation (SUSINNOV) adoption initiatives taken by the hoteliers in India. Also, an empirical approach has been used to develop a scale entitled “sustainability innovation adoption scale”.

Design/methodology/approach

Churchill’s (1979) scale development methodology has been used in the current study. An exhaustive literature review was done for item generation. For scale refinement, an empirical study was conducted on managers of hotels in India to understand the sustainability initiatives taken by them. Structural equation modelling has been implemented to know about the causal effects between the various unobserved variables.

Findings

A scale to measure factors influencing SUSINNOV adoption by hoteliers has been developed and validated empirically. The findings highlight that there are three major factors which influence SUSINNOV adoption: diffusion of innovation (DIT) within the industry, environmental marketing strategy adopted by organisations and sustainability initiatives taken by companies and customers. Moreover, current study also attempts to highlight that DIT has a significant positive influence on environmental marketing system.

Research limitations/implications

This study has multiple implications for hotel industry practitioners as well as academicians. The present three-dimensional conceptual model can be used for novel causes by implementing the sustainability initiatives in the hotel industry which can result in socially acceptable, economically viable and environment-friendly practices. An important contribution of the current study is that it proposes a theoretical model and develops a scale which will enrich the innovation adoption theories. Managers can use this scale to evaluate the status of SUSINNOV adoptions in their business practices.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first temporal and spatial study which tries to make a scale by including a holistic view of the facilitators of sustainable innovation adoption in the hotel industry.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Content available
Book part

Abstract

Details

National Identity and Europe in Times of Crisis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-514-6

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Article

Monika Łada, Alina Kozarkiewicz and Jim Haslam

This article explores the influence of duality in institutional logics on internal accounting, with a focus on a Polish public university. More particularly, we answer the…

Abstract

Purpose

This article explores the influence of duality in institutional logics on internal accounting, with a focus on a Polish public university. More particularly, we answer the research question: how does illegitimacy risk arising from the divergent pressures of the institutional environment impact management accountings in this institution?

Design/methodology/approach

This paper seeks to uncover intricacies of notions of internal legitimacy façade, decoupling and counter-coupling in practice. It explores details of organizational responses involving management accounting aimed at reducing illegitimacy risk. Achieving good organizational access, the authors adopt a qualitative case study approach involving contextual appreciation/document analysis/participant observation/discussion with key actors: facilitating building upon theoretical argumentation through finding things out from the field.

Findings

The authors uncover and discuss organizational solutions and legitimizing manoeuvres applied, identifying four adaptation tactics in the struggle to support legitimacy that they term ‘ceremonial calculations’, ‘legitimacy labelling’, ‘blackboxing’ and ‘shadow management accounting’. These can be seen in relation to decoupling and counter-coupling. Ceremonial calculations supported the internal façade. Shadow management accounting supported pro-effectiveness. Legitimacy labelling and blackboxing helped bind these two organizational layers, further supporting legitimacy. In interaction the four tactics engendered what can be seen as a ‘counter-coupling’ of management accounting. The authors clarify impacts for management accounting.

Research limits/implications

The usual limitations of case research apply for generalizability. Theorizing of management accounting in relation to contradictory logics is advanced.

Practical implications

The article illuminates how management accounting can be understood vis-à-vis contradictory logics.

Originality value

Elaboration of the tactics and their interaction is a theoretical and empirical contribution. Focus on a Polish university constitutes an empirical contribution.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Article

Monika Rahulan, Olga Troynikov, Chris Watson, Marius Janta and Veit Senner

– The purpose of this paper is to understand the difference in purchase decision behavior of compression sportswear by Baby Boomers and Generation Y.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the difference in purchase decision behavior of compression sportswear by Baby Boomers and Generation Y.

Design/methodology/approach

Two methods were used for data collection: a simulation study with 17 Baby Boomers and 23 Generation Y subjects using eye-tracking technology; and a questionnaire from a sample of 82 Baby Boomers and 84 Generation Y consumers.

Findings

Generation Y are more inquisitive and focus greatly on technical information. Baby Boomers are more confident with their choices, taking a shorter time to reach a purchase decision; they are more concerned with aspects that protect the wearer.

Research limitations/implications

Limited demographic information was collected from participants in the simulation study, further research is required in this area.

Practical implications

This study provides important insights into the purchase decision behavior of Baby Boomers and Generation Y for compression sportswear. By providing better understanding of some of the key drivers for purchase decisions it enables marketers to develop more effective marketing plans to engage with these important consumer groups.

Social implications

The focus and findings of this study provide further understanding of the motivations of two significant consumer cohorts. This study provides further momentum to the body of cohort research already available.

Originality/value

This study addresses a gap in literature with reference to the comparison of consumer behavior of generational cohorts when purchasing compression sportswear. Findings can be applied in other areas of sportswear and to other countries.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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