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Article

Minjeong Kang, Monica Sklar and Kim K.P. Johnson

The purpose of this paper is to investigate young professional men's perceptions and use of dress in relationship to their work identities.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate young professional men's perceptions and use of dress in relationship to their work identities.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 49 young men using a snowball sampling technique. Responses were analyzed using techniques outlined by Van Manen.

Findings

Salience of work identity was not connected to participants’ perceptions and use of dress. However, feeling complete in one's work identity was connected. Participants who perceived themselves as incomplete in their work identities used and planned to purchase items symbolic of their professions. Participants also expected to achieve specific outcomes as a result of their dress.

Research limitations/implications

Research findings support tenets of symbolic self‐completion theory.

Practical implications

Men's apparel retailers could promote their apparel as a symbol of qualities young men are interested in expressing and as a means to achieve desired work‐related outcomes.

Originality/value

The majority of research on relationships between dress and identity have focused on women. The paper illustrates that, as men are demonstrating renewed interest in their appearance, research that examines how men relate to and use dress in a workplace context has potential to contribute to extant literature and provide practical implications for merchandising apparel.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Book part

Nicki Pombier

Purpose: This chapter proposes narrative allyship across ability as a practice in which nondisabled researchers work with disabled nonresearchers to co-construct a process…

Abstract

Purpose: This chapter proposes narrative allyship across ability as a practice in which nondisabled researchers work with disabled nonresearchers to co-construct a process that centers and acts on the knowledge contained in and expressed by the lived experience of the disabled nonresearchers. This chapter situates narrative allyship across ability in the landscape of other participatory research practices, with a particular focus on oral history as a social justice praxis.

Approach: In order to explore the potential of this practice, the author outlines and reflects on both the methodology of her oral history graduate thesis work, a narrative project with self-advocates with Down syndrome, and includes and analyzes reflections about narrative allyship from a self-advocate with Down syndrome.

Findings: The author proposes three guiding principles for research as narrative allyship across ability, namely that such research further the interests of narrators as the narrators define them, optimize the autonomy of narrators, and tell stories with, instead of about, narrators.

Implications: This chapter suggests the promise of research praxis as a form of allyship: redressing inequality by addressing power, acknowledging expertise in subjugated knowledges, and connecting research practices to desires for social change or political outcomes. The author models methods by which others might include in their research narrative work across ability and demonstrates the particular value of knowledge produced when researchers attend to the lived expertise of those with disabilities. The practice of narrative allyship across ability has the potential to bring a wide range of experiences and modes of expression into the domains of research, history, policy, and culture that would otherwise exclude them.

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Article

Joan E. Beaudoin

The purpose of this paper is to report on a research study which examined how and why images were used by professional image users to inform the design and development of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a research study which examined how and why images were used by professional image users to inform the design and development of information systems and services.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 20 participants in four user groups, archaeologist, architect, art historian and artist, took part in this qualitative research study. Data was collected through a survey and one-on-one semi-structured interview and data analysis was completed using case-ordered displays and the constant comparative method.

Findings

The findings revealed that image use varied according to profession. Archaeologists and art historians identified using images within their lecture presentations, and for research and publications. While architects and artists noted using images for research and design creation, their work products differed. Several reasons why these professionals used images in their work were identified: knowledge, conceptual model, inspiration, cognitive recall, critical thinking, emotion, engagement, marketing, proof, social connection, translation, and trust.

Research limitations/implications

Study limitations include the small number of user groups, and methods dependent on participants' abilities to recall and clearly articulate past activities.

Originality/value

The study clarifies the varied roles visual information plays in the work of archaeologists, architects, art historians and artists. As the paper reveals how and why images are used, its contents are particularly useful for systems designers, librarians and other individuals who support image users.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 70 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article

Anouk de Regt, Matteo Montecchi and Sarah Lord Ferguson

Diffusion of fake news and pseudo-facts is becoming increasingly fast-paced and widespread, making it more difficult for the general public to separate reliable…

Abstract

Purpose

Diffusion of fake news and pseudo-facts is becoming increasingly fast-paced and widespread, making it more difficult for the general public to separate reliable information from misleading content. The purpose of this article is to provide a more advanced understanding of the underlying processes that contribute to the spread of health- and beauty-related rumors and of the mechanisms that can mitigate the risks associated with the diffusion of fake news.

Design/methodology/approach

By adopting denialism as a conceptual lens, this article introduces a framework that aims to explain the mechanisms through which fake news and pseudo-facts propagate within the health and beauty industry. Three exemplary case studies situated within the context of the health and beauty industry reveal the persuasiveness of these principles and shed light on the diffusion of false and misleading information.

Findings

The following seven denialistic marketing tactics that contribute to diffusion of fake news can be identified: (1) promoting a socially accepted image; (2) associating brands with a healthy lifestyle; (3) use of experts; (4) working with celebrity influencers; (5) selectively using and omitting facts; (6) sponsoring research and pseudo-science; and (7)exploiting regulatory loopholes. Through a better understanding of how fake news spreads, brand managers can simultaneously improve the optics that surround their firms, promote sales organically and reinforce consumers’ trust toward the brand.

Originality/value

Within the wider context of the health and beauty industry, this article sets to explore the mechanisms through which fake news and pseudo-facts propagate and influence brands and consumers. The article offers several contributions not only to the emergent literature on fake news but also to the wider marketing and consumer behavior literature.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Content available
Article

Eustache Mêgnigbêto

University, industry and government relationships, known under the Triple Helix, have been studied under various aspects. The West African region and countries have been…

Abstract

Purpose

University, industry and government relationships, known under the Triple Helix, have been studied under various aspects. The West African region and countries have been analysed with mutual information and transmission power, two information theory-based indicators. The purpose of this paper is to portray the landscape of West African Triple Helix innovation systems using three main game theory indicators (core, Shapley value and nucleolus) with the objective to measure the synergy within the selected innovation systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The collaboration between university, industry and government is modelled as a three-person coalitional game. Bibliographical data of selected countries were collected from Web of Science and organised according to collaboration patterns between the three actors. The characteristic functions of the games were computed, the cores plotted, the Shapley values and the nucleoli computed.

Findings

Either university or government has more power to create and lead to synergy; government shows solidarity towards university and industry in most of countries; and they are joined in their efforts by industry in two countries. The core exists in all the countries meaning that all the selected innovation systems present synergy; however, the extent is limited and varies over countries.

Research limitations/implications

Innovation includes all research products; however, this study focuses on publications only.

Originality/value

Synergy within a Triple Helix innovation system is studied up to now with information theory indicators. The paper portrays the landscape of West African Triple Helix innovation systems using three main game theory indicators: the core, the Shapley value and the nucleolus and gives a new way to study university, industry and government relationships.

Details

Journal of Industry-University Collaboration, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-357X

Keywords

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