Search results

1 – 10 of 79
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Adesegun Oyedele, Roberto Saldivar, Monica D. Hernandez and Emily Goenner

This paper aims to empirically test a model of different facets of perceived value (economic, emotional, aesthetic and convenience) and social mindfulness (SM) as…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to empirically test a model of different facets of perceived value (economic, emotional, aesthetic and convenience) and social mindfulness (SM) as determinants of consumer satisfaction and repurchase intentions of mobile smart wristbands.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire designed to assess these effects was administered to students at a Midwestern US university. Data were analyzed using AMOS structural equation modeling software.

Findings

The findings reveal that SM was significant in explicating perceived convenience value. The utilitarian value measures in the model (economic and convenience) were found to significantly affect satisfaction and in turn, repurchase intention. Surprisingly, all hedonic-related constructs in the model (emotional and aesthetic) did not significantly affect satisfaction and subsequently, repurchase intentions.

Practical implications

Findings from this research suggest that when targeting young adults, marketing managers and retailers should focus their efforts to convenience value as influenced by SM.

Originality/value

This is one of only a few studies in marketing to investigate the role of SM and perceived value on satisfaction and repurchase intentions of a technology gadget among young consumers.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Monica D. Hernandez, Yong Wang, Hong Sheng, Morris Kalliny and Michael Minor

The authors aim to examine the effect of location-driven logo placement on attention and memory on the web addressing differences between individuals that read…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors aim to examine the effect of location-driven logo placement on attention and memory on the web addressing differences between individuals that read unidirectionally (left-to-right [LTR]) versus bidirectionally (both right-to-left and LTR).

Design/methodology/approach

Using an eye-tracking approach combined with traditional verbal measures, the authors compared attention and memory measures from a sample composed of bidirectional (Arab/English) readers and unidirectional readers.

Findings

The findings reveal that unidirectional and bidirectional readers differ in attention patterns. Compared to bidirectional readers, unidirectional readers pay less attention to the logo on the bottom right corner of the webpage based on verbal measures. The eye-tracking data of the two groups further identify differences based on total hits and duration time. Unidirectional LTR readers demonstrate higher fluency in feature-based attention whereas bidirectional readers show higher fluency in spatial attention.

Originality/value

The authors expand on scarce research on reading direction bias effect on location-driven stimuli placement in online settings. They contribute to the understanding of the differences between unidirectional and bidirectional readers in their cognitive responses (attention and memory) to organization of marketing stimuli.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Adesegun Oyedele and Monica D. Hernandez

While researchers have argued that multicultural marketplaces are conceptually different from other types of marketplaces, the marketing literature has only recently begun…

Abstract

Purpose

While researchers have argued that multicultural marketplaces are conceptually different from other types of marketplaces, the marketing literature has only recently begun to develop multicultural perspective studies, and very little research has been done to examine intergroup complexities in consumption contexts (Demangeot et al., 2015). The purpose of this study is to fill this research gap by developing and empirically testing a research model to examine the effects of socio-political constructs and intergroup-based emotional variables on consumer decisions to consume cross-ethnic products.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire designed to assess the effects of socio-political constructs and intergroup-based emotional variables on consumer decisions to consume cross-ethnic products was developed and administered to 294 students at a Midwestern US university. The data were analysed using partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) techniques.

Findings

Results indicate that all path coefficients are significant. Social dominance, intergroup anxiety and intergroup experience were found to be important predictors of intergroup tolerance and, importantly, intergroup tolerance was found to significantly affect consumer attitude toward cross-ethnic products.

Research limitations/implications

In terms of limitations and future research implications, this research suffers from inherent limitations associated with self-reported survey research in a limited geographic region. Accordingly, study respondents may not be representative of consumers across the nation or the world, the respondents may not have understood the questions in the intended manner, and reported intentions may not reflect actual behaviour. This study was conducted among college students, but other target segments may have different intergroup experiences and perceptions of ethnic products.

Practical implications

Findings from this research suggest that firms offering ethnic products can increase crossover consumption appeal by implementing marketing communication programmes that integrate cultural forums and event tactics to promote positive intergroup experiences and tolerance among their multicultural customers.

Social implications

Regarding policy implications, public policymakers and social thinkers may use the findings of this study as a prism to better explicate intercultural dealings among multicultural consumers. The contention of this study about public policy implications is supported by Neal et al.’s (2013) perspectives on how consumption situations can serve as a lens for explicating intergroup emotions in multicultural marketplaces.

Originality/value

This is one of only a few studies in marketing to assess the effects of socio-political constructs in a consumption context. This is the first known study to underscore the importance of intranational ethnic differences and assess the effects of socio-political and intergroup-based emotional variables on attitude to consume ethnic products, specifically.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Monica D. Hernandez

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors contributing to positive attitudes toward advergames among later elementary school children in Mexico.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors contributing to positive attitudes toward advergames among later elementary school children in Mexico.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was conducted via experiments in an elementary school computer lab followed by a paper‐and‐pencil questionnaire.

Findings

Regression analysis revealed that entertainment and sociability positively related to positive attitudes toward advergames, whereas escapism was found to be negatively related. The most robust finding was the significant effect of entertainment on attitudes. Interestingly, Mexican children perceived entertainment and sociability as closely related. In sum, they claimed that they play online games for fun or as a means to socialize, but not to get away from their responsibilities.

Research limitations/implications

The games selected for the study promote global brands of an international corporation with considerable time in the market. Future work could develop local or hypothetical brands and test them in the same context.

Practical implications

Empirical evidence by means of a Mexican sample contributes by providing support about attitudes' formation and computer usage among Latin American children.

Originality/value

The study contributes by providing valuable insights about children's attitudes toward advergames formation.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Monica D. Hernandez and Michael S. Minor

Previous work examining the effect of emotional responses (arousal) in the online context has addressed one type of emotional data, relying only on self‐reporting. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous work examining the effect of emotional responses (arousal) in the online context has addressed one type of emotional data, relying only on self‐reporting. This paper aims to investigate the effect of arousal on short‐term brand memory in the context of advergaming, comparing both qualitative (observed behaviors and physiological data) and quantitative (self‐reported data) approaches.

Design/methodology/approach

Observed behaviors and physiological data were recorded during exposure to brand placements using an electrocardiogram machine. Qualitative results were compared to self‐reported data measured via a post‐exposure paper‐and‐pencil questionnaire.

Findings

The results revealed that the impact of physiological measures on memory was the most salient. The most robust finding was the negative effect of physiological measures on recall scores.

Research limitations/implications

As a laboratory procedure, the method is susceptible to some limitations. First, the similarity of the distractors is not tested and possibly the recognition tests may be either more difficult or easier than the recall tests. Second, as with any other physiological measure, EKG recording faces the limitation that some participants do not feel comfortable being connected to electrodes.

Practical implications

The results reinforce the need to include qualitative procedures when dealing with the effect of arousal on memory in the online context, in order to provide guidelines into an effective use of emotional measures and their effect in brand memory.

Originality/value

The study highlights the importance of the use of qualitative research methods to corroborate results from quantitative work when measuring emotional responses.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Monica D. Hernandez and Michael S. Minor

The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, it aims to review East‐West writing system (cross‐script) differences and summarize previous work examining the cross‐script…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, it aims to review East‐West writing system (cross‐script) differences and summarize previous work examining the cross‐script effect on consumer responses. Second, it aims to describe the implications for international marketing and cross‐cultural studies. Third, it seeks to propose specific questions for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

First, the paper presents a critical literature review of studies investigating cross‐script differences influencing consumer attitudes, memory, and information processing. Based on the provided integrative analysis, future directions are indicated for areas relying heavily on written communication, such as international marketing communications, internet marketing, international branding, and cross‐cultural consumer research.

Findings

Despite the pervasive nature and importance of written language, scant research has addressed differences between East/West consumer responses attributable to native script processing.

Originality/value

The paper is among the first to point out the insufficiency of scholarly studies on written language effects on consumer responses. The findings raise international marketers' awareness of differences in East‐West written language processing in order to effectively target consumers.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Monica D Hernandez and Michael S Minor

The purpose of this paper is to attempt to answer whether there is a difference between retrieving memory by using recall or false recall of brands in an interactive and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to attempt to answer whether there is a difference between retrieving memory by using recall or false recall of brands in an interactive and imagery-rich environment such as advergaming, and there are differences in memory in the same context if the languages of proficiency are based on the same script (e.g. alphabetic/alphabetic such as Spanish/English) versus cross-script (e.g. logographic/alphabetic, such as Chinese/English).

Design/methodology/approach

A series of international experiments addressed memory of brand placements in advergames – via correct and false recall – across groups of bilinguals from China, Mexico and South Korea.

Findings

The most salient finding of this study revealed advergame interactivity increased false memory more pronouncedly in the proficient groups (“experts”), supporting the notion of increased false recall as a result of feelings of accountability that experts naturally experience.

Research limitations/implications

The procedures of the international experiments were susceptible to some limitations concerning sampling design and experimental stimuli. Despite its limitations, this study helps to uncover the effect of these elements in short-term brand memory, to guide marketers for an effective use of brand and product placements in advergames.

Originality/value

Analysis of both correct and false recall of bilinguals in imagery-rich environments is of utmost importance. In these environments, memory may originate from experience or from imagination. The study addressed brand memory among diverse Internet audiences by taking into account both correct memory scores as well as false memory scores within the advergaming context.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Yong Jian Wang, Monica D. Hernandez, Michael S. Minor and Jie Wei

The purpose of this study is to explore the role of various superstitious beliefs in consumers' information processing and evaluation of brand logos.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the role of various superstitious beliefs in consumers' information processing and evaluation of brand logos.

Design/methodology/approach

When consumers encounter a brand logo without actually experiencing the company's offerings, superstition may be deployed to fill the void of the unknown to evaluate the brand logo and judge the benefits from the offerings represented by the brand. Multiple regression analysis was used to investigate the relationship between consumers' brand logo sensitivity and a number of antecedental superstition beliefs.

Findings

The results indicate that consumers' belief in fate has a negative effect on brand logo sensitivity, and consumers' belief in fortune‐tellers, belief in magic and fictional figures, belief in lucky charms, and belief in superstitious rituals have positive effects on brand logo sensitivity, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

From a consumer perspective, the authors' findings reveal that the more positive attitude consumers have towards a company's visual identity system, the more favorable brand image consumers have toward the company and its offerings.

Practical implications

Marketers should study and understand consumer superstition when attempting to build consumer‐friendly, culturally‐robust, and trouble‐free brands in the marketplace. Managerial implications and corporate branding strategies are suggested to avoid branding pitfalls and maximize brand equity in the consumer market.

Originality/value

The study offers a non‐traditional approach to explaining consumer‐based brand image and brand equity.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

When passengers are about to board Belgian carrier Brussels Airlines planes they are faced with an attractive stylized “b” on the tail, made up of 14 large dots. It hasn't always been 14. Back in 2007 the original design had 13 but the company was forced to amend it because of complaints from superstitious passengers, mainly from the USA and Italy.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Social implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that can have a broader social impact.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Content available
Article

Jeryl Whitelock

Abstract

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

1 – 10 of 79