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Article

Benjamin J. Haskin, Barry P. Barbash and Brian M. Hall

This paper seeks to describe the recent SEC Roundtable on Money Market Funds and Systemic Risk and the context behind the roundtable.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to describe the recent SEC Roundtable on Money Market Funds and Systemic Risk and the context behind the roundtable.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the SEC's roundtable on money market funds. Context to the roundtable is provided by describing recent steps taken by regulators to address risks posed by money funds. The paper also examines the principal topics discussed at the roundtable, including the debate on the systemic risks posed by money funds and potential regulatory changes that could mitigate those risks.

Findings

A number of regulatory proposals that were raised at the roundtable could, if adopted by the SEC, significantly alter the operation of money market funds as we know them, including requiring money market funds to institute market‐based net asset value (“NAV”) instead of stable NAV, be subject to banking regulations, create an industry‐funded private liquidity bank, or maintain liquidity reserve requirements.

Practical implications

The roundtable is significant as it is likely to influence the future discussion of the regulation of money market funds, which has potential implications for both the money management industry and entities financed by money market funds.

Originality/value

The paper provides information on money market reform for investment advisers, broker‐dealers, regulatory lawyers, institutional investors, and investment companies.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

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Abstract

It has often been alleged that the financial markets, with all their speculative excesses, wastefully absorb resources that could be better employed in the real economy. Fritz Machlup, originally a student of Ludwig von Mises, dealt with that charge in the aftermath of the 1929 crash. His defense of the stock market remains germane to our time. In it, he argues that the stock exchange offers an important alternative mechanism of allocating savings to investment, while generally being a way station through which money travels on its way to the real economy either to finance capital projects or to be spent on consumer goods. To the extent the stock market ever absorbs capital, it is only during stock market booms. Yet these are generated by the uncertain course of central bank monetary expansion. Bull and bear markets cycles are, at bottom, politically driven events.

Details

Entangled Political Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-102-2

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Article

Kashi Khazeh and Robert C. Winder

This study compares the effectiveness of money market hedges and options hedges for both payables and receivables denominated in British pounds, German marks, Japanese yen…

Abstract

This study compares the effectiveness of money market hedges and options hedges for both payables and receivables denominated in British pounds, German marks, Japanese yen and the Swiss franc. Data on interest rates, exchange rates, and options contracts were obtained from public sources for two recent time periods. This information was used to determine, for each currency: 1) the lowest rate of exchange for payables, and 2) the highest rate of exchange for receivables for each hedging technique. Unique “money market hedge exchange rate factors” and “options hedge exchange rate factors” were developed to facilitate comparisons between the two hedging techniques.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Article

Roger J. Sandilands

Allyn Young′s lectures, as recorded by the young Nicholas Kaldor,survey the historical roots of the subject from Aristotle through to themodern neo‐classical writers. The…

Abstract

Allyn Young′s lectures, as recorded by the young Nicholas Kaldor, survey the historical roots of the subject from Aristotle through to the modern neo‐classical writers. The focus throughout is on the conditions making for economic progress, with stress on the institutional developments that extend and are extended by the size of the market. Organisational changes that promote the division of labour and specialisation within and between firms and industries, and which promote competition and mobility, are seen as the vital factors in growth. In the absence of new markets, inventions as such play only a minor role. The economic system is an inter‐related whole, or a living “organon”. It is from this perspective that micro‐economic relations are analysed, and this helps expose certain fallacies of composition associated with the marginal productivity theory of production and distribution. Factors are paid not because they are productive but because they are scarce. Likewise he shows why Marshallian supply and demand schedules, based on the “one thing at a time” approach, cannot adequately describe the dynamic growth properties of the system. Supply and demand cannot be simply integrated to arrive at a picture of the whole economy. These notes are complemented by eleven articles in the Encyclopaedia Britannica which were published shortly after Young′s sudden death in 1929.

Details

Journal of Economic Studies, vol. 17 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3585

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Article

Anghel N. Rugina

The equation of unified knowledge says that S = f (A,P) which means that the practical solution to a given problem is a function of the existing, empirical, actual…

Abstract

The equation of unified knowledge says that S = f (A,P) which means that the practical solution to a given problem is a function of the existing, empirical, actual realities and the future, potential, best possible conditions of general stable equilibrium which both pure and practical reason, exhaustive in the Kantian sense, show as being within the realm of potential realities beyond any doubt. The first classical revolution in economic thinking, included in factor “P” of the equation, conceived the economic and financial problems in terms of a model of ideal conditions of stable equilibrium but neglected the full consideration of the existing, actual conditions. That is the main reason why, in the end, it failed. The second modern revolution, included in factor “A” of the equation, conceived the economic and financial problems in terms of the existing, actual conditions, usually in disequilibrium or unstable equilibrium (in case of stagnation) and neglected the sense of right direction expressed in factor “P” or the realization of general, stable equilibrium. That is the main reason why the modern revolution failed in the past and is failing in front of our eyes in the present. The equation of unified knowledge, perceived as a sui generis synthesis between classical and modern thinking has been applied rigorously and systematically in writing the enclosed American‐British economic, monetary, financial and social stabilization plans. In the final analysis, a new economic philosophy, based on a synthesis between classical and modern thinking, called here the new economics of unified knowledge, is applied to solve the malaise of the twentieth century which resulted from a confusion between thinking in terms of stable equilibrium on the one hand and disequilibrium or unstable equilibrium on the other.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article

Xiu Zhang, Shoudong Chen and Yang Liu

The purpose of this paper is to empirically analyze the transmission mechanism between benchmark interest rate of financial market, money market interest rate and capital…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically analyze the transmission mechanism between benchmark interest rate of financial market, money market interest rate and capital market yields in order to reveal the dynamic evolution characters and core influential structure between different market interest rates.

Design/methodology/approach

Using Dirichlet-VAR (DVAR) model, this study analyze the relationship between markets rates according to the equilibrium model in money market and capital market.

Findings

Empirical results show that the interest rate transmission mechanism functions smoothly between interest rates of different levels. Interest rate of bills issued by the central bank can effectively reflect changes in monetary policy and guide the fluidity of market, playing the anchor role in interest rate pricing. There exists a closed loop feedback between interest rate of bills issued by the central bank, and money market interest rate, as well as between money market interest rate and bond market interest rate. The former is a loop by administrative means while the latter is the one mainly affected by market-oriented means. The response by money market and bond market toward the change of benchmark interest rate is unsymmetrical as money market is more sensitive to a loose monetary policy while bond market is more sensitive to a tight monetary policy. Stock market is strongly affected by uncertainty of benchmark interest rate.

Originality/value

DVAR model is the extension of research on instable data and multiple variable causality test, which expands the causality analysis between two variables to multiple variables causality impact analysis which contains non-stable and structurally instable economic data.

Details

China Finance Review International, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1398

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Book part

Rosaria Rita Canale and Rajmund Mirdala

The role of money and monetary policy of the central bank in pursuing macroeconomic stability has significantly changed over the period since the end of World War II…

Abstract

The role of money and monetary policy of the central bank in pursuing macroeconomic stability has significantly changed over the period since the end of World War II. Globalization, liberalization, integration, and transition processes generally shaped the crucial milestones of the macroeconomic development and substantial features of economic policy and its framework in Europe. Policy-driven changes together with variety of exogenous shocks significantly affected the key features of macroeconomic environment on the European continent that fashioned the framework and design of monetary policies.

This chapter examines the key basis of the central bank’s monetary policy on its way to pursue and preserve the internal and external stability of the purchasing power of money. Substantial elements of the monetary policy like objectives and strategies are not only generally introduced but also critically discussed according to their accuracy, suitability, and reliability in the changing macroeconomic conditions. Brief overview of the Eurozone common monetary policy milestones and the past Eastern bloc countries’ experience with a variety of exchange rate regimes provides interesting empirical evidence on origins and implications of vital changes in the monetary policy conduction in Europe and the Eurozone.

Details

Fiscal and Monetary Policy in the Eurozone: Theoretical Concepts and Empirical Evidence
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-793-7

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Book part

Stephen A. Kowalewski

Purpose – To provide a general theory for how the ancient Mesoamerican economy functioned.Design/methods/approach – First the chapter describes formally the sectors or…

Abstract

Purpose – To provide a general theory for how the ancient Mesoamerican economy functioned.

Design/methods/approach – First the chapter describes formally the sectors or operations of the economy: production, consumption, labor, specialization, exchange and prices, savings and investment, credit, quasi-money, markets, and dynamics. Then it relates this economy to its Mesoamerican cultural context.

Findings – Much but not all of this economy, with its great volume of transactions, worked according to market principles, without coinage or state-fiat money yet not barter. The theory has testable implications. Periods of growth and decline in preindustrial urban societies could have been due to economic forces.

Research limitations/implications – The presentation is verbal, not mathematical. Precolumbian economic documents hardly exist; advances in this line of research will have to come from archaeology (in part informed by earliest contact-era history).

Social implications – Extending theories of money and markets to include preindustrial urban societies should deepen and enrich economic thinking generally.

Originality/value of chapter – The first nonsubstantivist model of the Mesoamerican economy; insights on specialization and competition when firms are households; how high volumes of exchange work with commodity monies.

Details

Political Economy, Neoliberalism, and the Prehistoric Economies of Latin America
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-059-8

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Article

Hsin-Hui Chiu and Lu Zhu

This paper aims to examine the information content of mutual fund flows and its indication on investors’ preference/tolerance toward risk.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the information content of mutual fund flows and its indication on investors’ preference/tolerance toward risk.

Design/methodology/approach

Mutual funds are grouped into different categories based on assets with different levels of risk perceptions (e.g. equity fund, money market fund), and this information is publicly accessible. This paper examines the correlation patterns between fund flows and changes in credit default swaps (CDS) spreads. In addition, it also examines such a relation by dividing the samples into different fund types (e.g. retail vs institutional fund flows).

Findings

This paper suggests that equity fund flows are negatively related to CDS spreads, whereas money market fund flows are positively related to CDS spreads. Furthermore, it indicates that retail fund flows provide insightful information and serve as the primary driver behind the relation between fund flows and CDS spreads.

Originality/value

The findings of this paper indicate that flows into equity and money market funds could serve as a risk sentiment in credit markets. And this is the first study, to the best of the author’s knowledge, to establish such a linkage between fund flows and CDS spreads to help investors gauge credit market sentiment.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

Keywords

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Article

Sutarno Bintoro, Sjamsiar Sjamsuddin, Ratih Nur Pratiwi and Hermawan

To introduce new initiatives in combating money laundering and related corruption in the capital market sector through international cooperation between Indonesia and Australia.

Abstract

Purpose

To introduce new initiatives in combating money laundering and related corruption in the capital market sector through international cooperation between Indonesia and Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used qualitative research methods. Data were obtained through observation, interviews and secondary data analysis. Primary and secondary data were then analyzed with an interactive model.

Findings

The Indonesian capital market is at high risk of being used as a means of laundering corrupt money. Our analysis found a major obstacle when investigators and prosecutors have handled money laundering cases conducted in the capital market because they have not had enough knowledge related to the capital market and its business processes.

Originality/value

This article is expected to add to the literature on handling money laundering from corruption carried out in the capital market. It describes best-practice efforts undertaken by Indonesia and Australia.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

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