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Article

Olga Piedad Zalamea Patino, Jos Van Orshoven and Thérèse Steenberghen

The purpose of this paper is to present the development of an ontological model consisting of terms and relationships between these terms, creating a conceptual…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the development of an ontological model consisting of terms and relationships between these terms, creating a conceptual information model for the Built Cultural Heritage (BCH) domain, more specifically for preventive conservation.

Design/methodology/approach

The On-To-Knowledge methodology was applied in the ontology development process. Terms related to preventive conservation were identified by means of a taxonomy which was used later to identify related existing ontologies. Three ontologies were identified and merged, i.e. Geneva City Geographic Markup Language (Geneva CityGML), Monument Damage ontology (Mondis) and CIDOC Conceptual Reference Model (CIDOC-CRM). Additional classes and properties were defined as to provide a complete semantic framework for management of BCH.

Findings

A BCH-ontology for preventive conservation was created. It consists of 143 classes from which 38 originate from the Mondis ontology, 38 from Geneva CityGML, 37 from CIDOC-CRM and 30 were newly created. The ontology was applied in a use case related to the New cathedral in the city of Cuenca, Ecuador. Advantages over other type of systems and for the BCH-domain were discussed based on this example.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed ontology is in a testing stage through which a number of its aspects are being verified.

Originality/value

This ontological model is the first one to focus on the preventive conservation of BCH.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Global Leadership Talent Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-543-6

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Abstract

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European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

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Article

Samantha Miles and Kate Ringham

The purpose of this paper is to use a multi-disciplinary theoretical understanding of boundary setting to develop a quadripartite model in which sustainability reporting…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to use a multi-disciplinary theoretical understanding of boundary setting to develop a quadripartite model in which sustainability reporting boundaries are classified as “Reputation Management”, “Ownership and Control”, “Accountability”; and, “Stakeholder Engagement”. Content analysis is then used to empirically test the model.

Design/methodology/approach

Using impression management theory, rationalism, systems and contingency theory, and network theory, a model is created which classifies sustainability reporting boundaries. Content analysis is used to empirically test boundaries across the disclosure of 49 GRI topics by the FTSE100.

Findings

Sustainability reporting fails to discharge accountability due to adoption of narrow “Reputation Management” boundaries. Boundaries are significantly (p<0.0001) narrower than previous research suggests. Findings support impression management theory as the strongest theory to predict reporting content. An ownership and control boundary, although widely criticized, represents the boundary of progressive reporters, lending marginal support for economic theories. Accountability boundaries are scarce. No evidence was found for stakeholder engagement boundaries.

Practical implications

The determination of boundary is critical to the discharge of accountability. A critical consideration of boundary setting is required, including authentic stakeholder engagement in determining boundaries and transparency of boundary adopted. The results are ranked to enable benchmarking of the FTSE100. Boundaries can be widened through regulation or “name and shame campaigns”.

Originality/value

This paper provides a theory-informed advancement in thinking on sustainability reporting boundary setting and the importance of this for advancing sustainability reporting quality.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Article

Abstract

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 76 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article

Peter Koudal and Gary C. Coleman

Over the last two years, the authors have studied the growth strategies and the supporting operations of nearly 650 companies around the world. While most have the

Abstract

Purpose

Over the last two years, the authors have studied the growth strategies and the supporting operations of nearly 650 companies around the world. While most have the expectation that innovation will drive corporate fortunes, the research makes it clear that building or restructuring business operations to profitably bring new products and services to market is a top priority only for best performing companies but near the bottom of most companies' priorities.

Design/methodology/approach

Explains how top‐performing global companies are investing in the product development capabilities, the supply chain process infrastructure, and the sophisticated information systems needed to support and synchronize innovation across the value chain.

Findings

Research on a subset of the survey base (the 300+ larger companies and business units with revenues ranging from US$200 million to US$10 billion and higher) shows that those that can synchronize complex global value chains – the complexity masters – are up to 73 percent more profitable than the others.

Research limitations/implications

Interviews with senior managers at leading firms and case studies on the complexity masters would be of high value.

Practical implications

The authors suggest three steps: create innovation – build an idea‐generation machine; exploit innovation where and when it matters; and invest in innovation capabilities for creating and sustaining a profit cycle. The four ingredients that make top‐performing companies stand out are visibility, flexibility, collaboration, and technology.

Originality/value

Lists the best practices – the strategies and tactics – of the most profitable innovators, the elite “complexity masters.”

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Article

Shaad Habeeb

Although individual work performance (IWP) has been the subject of research by many authors, most of them have explored work performance as an outcome. However, IWP can…

Abstract

Purpose

Although individual work performance (IWP) has been the subject of research by many authors, most of them have explored work performance as an outcome. However, IWP can also be viewed as conducive job behaviors. On the other hand, as employee behavior is contextual, it must be analyzed from various angles, especially in regard to a national culture of employees. In line with that, the purpose of this study was to explore the behavior-based IWP in the banking and insurance sector in New Delhi (India) by testing the original tool and modifying it into a proposed instrument for its assessment in a Hindi–English environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a quantitative approach and exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, specific items for the work performance assessment were selected. The specific steps involved in these processes and resulting item inclusion are discussed in detail.

Findings

Although employees display a positive behavior-related work performance, there is a difference between private and public company workers. The study proposes modification to the original scale used.

Originality/value

The originality of the study is the assessment of IWP as a result of job behaviors in the non-Western context, in banking and insurance companies. The study has both theoretical and practical value.

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Article

Nattaporn Thongsri, Liang Shen, Yukun Bao and Ibraheem Mubarak Alharbi

The purpose of this study was to investigate factors that influence the intention to use mobile learning (m-learning) by learners in developing countries such as Thailand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate factors that influence the intention to use mobile learning (m-learning) by learners in developing countries such as Thailand. This study integrated two theories; namely, the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology (UTAUT), which focuses on technology, and uses and gratifications theory (UGT), which involves studying learners’ motivation.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying a quantitative research method, this study conducted a survey of 359 undergraduates. The partial least squares methods and a statistical analysis technique based on the structural equation modelling (SEM), were used to analyse the data.

Findings

The results revealed that the performance expectancy, cognitive need, affective need and social need had significant effect on intention to use m-learning. Furthermore, this study found a significant effect of the cognitive need on the performance expectancy and social need on effort expectancy.

Practical implications

This research model has provided guidelines for the effective development of educational applications for use on mobile devices. The findings can be applied as guidelines for public organizations to develop educational strategies to further encourage the development of online learning.

Originality/value

This research closed a gap of understanding from previous studies by integrating UTAUT and UGT. The method derived from the theoretically integrated model could be applied to study the intentions for the implementation the mobile learning application from the context of developing countries such as Thailand.

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Article

Kuen‐Hung Tsai and Jiann‐Chyuan Wang

To examine the moderating effect of employee benefits on the relationship between labor input and firm output.

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the moderating effect of employee benefits on the relationship between labor input and firm output.

Design/methodology/approach

Three high‐tech sectors, covering different time periods, are taken as the analytical samples. An extended Cobb‐Douglas production function is adopted to examine the research hypotheses.

Findings

Examinations reveal that employee benefits have a moderating effect on firm productivity, irrespective of industry or firm size. Furthermore, the effect size is greater in small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) than in large firms.

Research limitations/implications

Using benefits to achieve competitive advantage for SMEs seems to be more important than for large firms. However, this examination concentrates on the electronics industry only.

Practical implications

Benefits can help a firm achieve competitive advantage through better quality of labor.

Originality/value

This study makes an interesting contribution to the understanding of the relationship between benefits and firm productivity.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article

Ana Fialho, Ana Morais and Rosalina Pisco Costa

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the introduction of water security, in 2015, as a category in the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) Climate A-List…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether the introduction of water security, in 2015, as a category in the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) Climate A-List, increases the use of impression management (IM) strategies. The purpose is to analyze how companies reacted to programmes of voluntary disclosure of environmental information.

Design/methodology/approach

Mixed-methods research was developed, combining a qualitative and quantitative approach. This study first used a qualitative content analysis of 15 companies’ reports, from the materials sector, which was scored in the CDP Climate A-List, in 2017, to identify the IM strategies adopted. Next, this study conducted a quantitative analysis to test the mean differences of water references between years, industry and region.

Findings

Three types of IM strategies are identified (justification and commitment, self-promotion and authorization). The references identified as self-promotion strategy increased in 2016. This indicates companies reacted to the programmes for voluntary disclosure of environmental information by increasing strategies of legitimization and image promotion.

Research limitations/implications

Further research can be developed, focusing only on sustainability reports and extending the number of companies, the period and sectors under analysis.

Originality/value

This paper shows how the inclusion of a topic such as water security in an environmental ranking of companies, namely, CDP A-List, affects the use of IM strategies in voluntary disclosures.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

Keywords

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