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1 – 10 of 16
Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Marina Dabic, Ana Colovic, Olivier Lamotte, Mollie Painter-Morland and Silvana Brozovic

The purpose of this study is to analyze the literature on industry-specific corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyze the literature on industry-specific corporate social responsibility (CSR) practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a multiple-keyword search, the authors identified 302 articles reporting on such practices, published in 99 different academic journals between 1995 and 2014. These articles were analyzed to map the CSR literature, identify which industries have been under greater scrutiny and distinguish trends in the most researched industries.

Findings

The authors’ findings indicate that the CSR studies are very unevenly distributed and that the issues studied and the methods used vary widely across industries. The authors also map this field of study and propose suggestions on where research on industry-specific CSR should go in the future.

Originality/value

The first extensive, systematic analysis of the industry-specific CSR literature is provided. The current research adds value to the literature by highlighting the key issues investigated, as well as those that require further inquiry.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 June 2013

Yoann Bazin

576

Abstract

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

Mollie Painter-Morland

The purpose of this paper is to perform a philosophical interrogation of some assumptions that underpin management education. It offers an analysis of how these…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to perform a philosophical interrogation of some assumptions that underpin management education. It offers an analysis of how these assumptions may influence the promotion the responsible management agenda within business schools.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a theoretical exploration based on a literature review and philosophical analysis.

Findings

The ontological and epistemological assumptions that underpin management education pose barriers to responsible management education. A combination of ontological and epistemological assumptions privilege an instrumental approach based on simplistic utilitarian premises. These assumptions make it difficult to engage with the long term, relational and complex nature of the ethics and sustainability concerns that are central to responsible management education.

Practical implications

Understanding the assumptions that underpin management education may assist in challenging the current paradigm and rethinking our approaches to responsible management.

Originality/value

The paper pursues the tacit assumptions that may underpin empirical findings around the blockages experienced when schools pursue responsible management education. It takes the research into the current state of business school education further by exploring what informs and sustains its current functioning.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 June 2014

Isabel Canto de Loura

The purpose of this paper is to contextualize the potential contribution that experiential learning and a learner-centred pedagogical approach may have when aiming to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contextualize the potential contribution that experiential learning and a learner-centred pedagogical approach may have when aiming to embed sustainability-focused and corporate social responsibility issues in businesses throughout the core curriculum targetted at international cohorts of undergraduate management students.

Design/methodology/approach

A new conceptual framework for experiential learning that draws on both scholarly and experimental learning. Using learner-centred learning, the approach aims to engage each student to act both as a learner and a mentor, thus empowering them into enhancing their own and the overall class’ learning experience.

Findings

Applying the diversity of students’ individual cultural mindsets to analyse and critically evaluate some of the current most pressing organizational and national/international dilemmas in sustainability. The preliminary outcomes seem to indicate that this approach enriches the students’ learning experience and motivates them to become reflective practitioners and sustainability-focused leaders in their future organizational roles.

Research limitations/implications

A framework for an empirical mapping of this important area of teaching and learning (T & L) aimed at a highly international body of undergraduate management students. This is currently under-represented in academic writing and practice, as most of the comparable situations so far mainly address post-graduate cases and do not reflect on the international diversity of the student body.

Practical implications

This research reflects on the importance of embedding diverse views on the same issues based on different cultural and socio-economic perspectives, and therefore it brings value to the students’ experience in view of enhancing their global and international human relations awareness and negotiation skills in view of more meaningful sustainability-focused plans and actions.

Social implications

Students become aware of differences in needs, resources, cultural perceptions, business standards, practices and policies in place in different countries, and they will be committed to embedding sustainability issues in their future life as business practitioners and will be able to ensure the most appropriate business responses to a planet and humanity under pressure.

Originality/value

A rather innovative T & L approach to embed sustainability issues in undergraduate management students training in a highly international context. This is currently under-represented in academic writing and practice, in spite of the numerous programmes that nowadays bring students from all over the world to study together at higher education/university undergraduate level.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 June 2014

Leanna Lawter, Tuvana Rua and Chun Guo

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how learning styles and learning spaces interact to stimulate deep learning. Specifically the paper investigated the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how learning styles and learning spaces interact to stimulate deep learning. Specifically the paper investigated the interaction of learning styles with ethics education and the ethical climate to influence the likelihood of engaging in ethical behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from two groups of students – those who had completed a business ethics course and those who had not completed a business ethics course. The sample consisted of 180 undergraduate students at a private university in the USA. Data were analyzed using regression analysis to test the hypotheses. A scenario-based measure of the likelihood of engaging in ethical behavior was developed and implemented in the study.

Findings

Both ethics education and ethical climate had a direct impact on a student ' s likelihood of engaging in ethical behavior. The interaction between learning style and business ethics class significantly impacted experiential learners’ likelihood of engaging in ethical behaviors. Results for non-experiential learners as relates to ethical climate were non-significant, but ad hoc analysis indicates ethical climate significantly impacted likelihood to engage in ethical behaviors.

Practical implications

The findings have practical implications for how universities should utilize learning spaces both inside and outside the classroom to be stimulate deep learning and be more effective in sensitizing students to ethical behavior.

Originality/value

The results support using formal and informal learning spaces to stimulate deep learning as it relates to ethics education in universities.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 June 2014

Nikolai Mouraviev and Nada K. Kakabadse

The purpose of this paper is to investigate to what extent one can apply experiential learning theory (ELT) to the public-private partnership (PPP) setting in Russia and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate to what extent one can apply experiential learning theory (ELT) to the public-private partnership (PPP) setting in Russia and to draw insights regarding the learning cycle ' s nature. Additionally, the paper assesses whether the PPP case confirms Kolb ' s ELT.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study draws upon primary data which the authors collected by interviewing informants including a PPP operator ' s managers, lawyers from Russian law firms and an expert from the National PPP Centre. The authors accomplished data source triangulation in order to ensure a high degree of research validity.

Findings

Experiential learning has resulted in a successful and a relatively fast PPP project launch without the concessionary framework. The lessons learned include the need for effective stakeholder engagement; avoiding being stuck in bureaucracy such as collaboration with Federal Ministries and anti-trust agency; avoiding application for government funding as the approval process is tangled and lengthy; attracting strategic private investors; shaping positive public perception of a PPP project; and making continuous efforts in order to effectively mitigate the public acceptance risk.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to ELT by incorporating the impact of social environment in the learning model. Additionally, the paper tests the applicability of ELT to learning in the complex organisational setting, i.e., a PPP.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 June 2014

Isabel Canto de Loura

The purpose of this paper is to contribute an illustrative case study on the application of participatory and learner-centred model, using a highly international cohort of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute an illustrative case study on the application of participatory and learner-centred model, using a highly international cohort of students’ tacit knowledge and shared experiential learning in the context of integrating mainstreaming sustainability-focused topics in business education at undergraduate level.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is about the development of a participative experiential learning pedagogical framework which the authors named “experiential simulation learning approach”, with the acronym ELSA, designed to meet the specific needs of a highly international cohort of rather sustainability-reluctant undergraduate management students.

Findings

Using students’ diverse tacit knowledge and developing a relevant experiential active learning (EAL) model stood out as being a most powerful teaching-and-learning tool. It seemed to help to enhance critical thinking and trigger cohesiveness in class; this favoured a collaborative learning climate which in turn might lead to the tacit acquisition of life-long skills.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitations to the development of this approach were: the lack of context-specific updated and academically reliable bibliography; the undergraduate students’ widespread tendency to refer mainly to “digests” of information (preferably online), rather than engaging in critical analysis of contents in academically acknowledged books and journals; the international undergraduate students’ personal challenges as “foreigners” which may affect them mainly in relation to: group work, independent learning, confidence and communication.

Practical implications

It seems that integrating EAL is quite effective in the context of undergraduate management students, particularly in view of leading rather reluctant students to understand and be willing to positively apply sustainability-based principles to their own change management process and to become active leaders of organisational change.

Originality/value

The methodological framework hereby presented is quite innovative, as it seems to be among the very first to be implemented in view of enhancing undergraduate students’ learning experience, instead of targeting post-graduate students. This is extremely relevant in regards to embedding sustainability concepts, frameworks and tools, as they prove to be much more significant and long-lasting if integrated in the early stages of training of future business management professionals.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 June 2014

Nicola M. Pless and Markéta Borecká

International service learning is a new trend in management development and a new field of research. International Service Learning Programs (ISLP) are experiential…

Abstract

Purpose

International service learning is a new trend in management development and a new field of research. International Service Learning Programs (ISLP) are experiential corporate volunteering initiatives designed to give employees the chance to work for a short spell abroad (often in a developing or emerging market) on a service assignment with a partner from the social sector (e.g. NGO, social enterprise). The service assignment is a project defined with a social-sector partner on which the corporate employee works full-time on a pro-bono basis and contributes his/her knowledge and expertise in exchange for a rich learning experience. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the use of ISLP in business firms and conducts a comparative analysis of six programs set up by multinational corporations from three industries (health, technology, and accounting and professional services). It identifies characteristics and similarities among programs, discusses differences, offers criteria for program classification and areas for future research. As such, it is an important starting point for quantitative studies.

Design/methodology/approach –

This is a qualitative study based on six ISLP. The data were gathered through desk research, interviews with program representatives and a structured questionnaire containing closed and open-ended questions.

Findings

Regardless of the stated aims (which usually stress value for the participants, the company and the communities), most programs had one clear focus (two programs in the area of leadership development, two in the area of community development) while two showed closely linked foci (with slightly greater emphasis on organization development than on the other areas).

Research limitations/implications

The authors suggest that the type of ISLP has an effect on the learning outcomes. Since companies are still testing usefulness and outcomes of these programs, academic research that provides comparative quantitative data on the outcomes of such programs is of great value for business practice.

Practical implications

This systematic overview and classification of ISLP is a starting point for empirical program comparisons as well as for the evaluation of different service learning approaches. This could prove very useful for other companies planning to set up or refine their own ISLP to achieve certain outcomes.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that compares ISLP run by multinational corporations. It identifies a number of category areas in which they differ (e.g. in placement length, nature of the assignment – individual or in teams, learning methods used) and provides a typology for program classification (leadership development, organization development or community development).

Article
Publication date: 9 June 2014

Jennifer Patterson

The purpose of this paper is to apply experiential learning theory to discuss a UK project-based knowledge transfer partnership (KPT) project between a university and a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply experiential learning theory to discuss a UK project-based knowledge transfer partnership (KPT) project between a university and a third sector organisation offering outdoor and experiential education for around 32,000 inner city children annually. It uses different models to critically consider how different experiential paradigms or world-views support different understandings of project experience in the real world. It examines the nature of experiential learning through project experience, applying a phenomenological inquiry to reflect on how experiential learning is valued academically and culturally. It considers environmental influences to balance the relational practices that represent intangible experiential elements in partnership work.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a postmodern qualitative methodology, this paper applies different frameworks to narrative, a synthesis of data from the project, an interview, literature and reflection to present a critical consideration of experiential learning constructs. It foregrounds the academic value of ethical subjectivity and as such also presents a reflective Feminist auto-ethnographic praxis grounded in the project.

Findings

Experiential learning is critical for human inquiry. Valuing experiential learning methods differently offers ethical applications for facilitating project work and partner relationships.

Practical implications

Applied experiential learning theory supports organisational understanding in project work. An ethics of subjectivity places equal value on expertise in its own environment leading to a facilitated rather than a hierarchical transfer of knowledge, critical for project success. The project is financially successful and has wide reaching social and environmental impact. Thinking differently about provision means a substantial number of children beyond those physically visiting the organisation will benefit through teacher training.

Social implications

The UK government no longer funds outdoor education. This paper demonstrates the importance of fostering environmental relationships for human identity, to support education for sustainable development and wider societal and environmental understandings.

Originality/value

Developed through project process this is a new values-based, environmental, organisational and educational transformational approach to partnership. It is useful in education, working in partnership with businesses and ESD.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

1 – 10 of 16