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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2021

Mohd Imran Khan, Shahbaz Khan, Urfi Khan and Abid Haleem

Big Data can be utilised for efficient use of resources and to provide better services to the resident in order to enhance the delivery of urban services and create…

Abstract

Purpose

Big Data can be utilised for efficient use of resources and to provide better services to the resident in order to enhance the delivery of urban services and create sustainable build environment. However, the adoption of Big Data faces many challenges at the implementation level. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to identify the challenges towards the efficient application of Big Data in smart cities development and analyse the inter-relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The 14 Big Data challenges are identified through the literature review and validated with the expert’s feedback. After that the inter-relationships among the identified challenges are developed using an integrated approach of fuzzy Interpretive Structural Modelling (fuzzy-ISM) and fuzzy Decision-Making Trial and Evaluation Laboratory (fuzzy-DEMATEL).

Findings

Evaluation of interrelationships among the challenges suggests that diverse population in smart cities and lack of infrastructure are the significant challenges that impede the integration of Big Data in the development of smart cities.

Research limitations/implications

This study will enable practitioners, policy planners involved in smart city projects in tackling the challenges in an optimised manner for the hindrance free and accelerated development of smart cities.

Originality/value

This research is an initial effort to develop an interpretive structural model of Big Data challenges for smart cities development which gives a clearer picture of how the identified challenges interact with each other.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 May 2019

Mohd Imran Khan, Shahbaz Khan and Abid Haleem

Assurance of Halal integrity up to the consumption point requires a supply chain approach. Credence quality attributes of Halal products make adoption and management of…

Abstract

Purpose

Assurance of Halal integrity up to the consumption point requires a supply chain approach. Credence quality attributes of Halal products make adoption and management of Halal practices along the whole supply chain a challenging task. This paper aims to explore and evaluate the barriers in the management of the Halal supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reviews the contemporary literature regarding Halal and management of Halal supply chain and subsequently identifies significant barriers towards managing the Halal supply chain. Further, these barriers are examined quantitatively using Best Worst Method.

Findings

This study has established significant barriers to Halal supply chain management. Moreover, prioritisation of barriers gives a hierarchy to mitigate these significant barriers. The analysis suggests that reduced demand for Halal products is the highly weighted barrier. Improper laws to regulate the Halal industry and lack of policy framework are hindering the effective management of the Halal supply chain.

Research limitations/implications

This study explored a limited number of barriers; it may be possible that some barriers might not have captured. Further, the identified barriers are generic and validated in the context of multicultural societies. Expert opinion has been used to obtain the weight of barriers which may be biased.

Originality/value

To the best of author’s knowledge, no study has categorically explored and presented a holistic framework to mitigate barriers of managing Halal practices in the supply chain.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2021

Mohd Imran Khan, Abid Haleem and Shahbaz Khan

Halal supply chain management (HSCM) is an emerging research area and is in the early stage of evolution. This study aims to identify 11 critical factors towards effective…

Abstract

Purpose

Halal supply chain management (HSCM) is an emerging research area and is in the early stage of evolution. This study aims to identify 11 critical factors towards effective management of a Halal supply chain (HSC) and provides a framework for the HSCM by evaluating Halal practices' impact on sustainability performance measures empirically.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire-based survey has been carried out to collect data for analysis. The statistical analysis is accomplished by exploiting merits of factor analysis and structural equation modelling (SEM).

Findings

The results imply that out of 11 critical factors, nine factors on effective management of the HSC are statistically significant, and impacts of two critical factors are positive but statistically insignificant. In the structural model, the path coefficient of all success indicators are positive and statistically significant. In terms of the path coefficient of sustainable performance measures of HSC, all three dimensions, economic, environmental and social, are positive and statistically significant.

Research limitations/implications

The research extends Halal and supply chain management's literature by proposing Halal as a standard quality control system, as it focuses on wholesome consumption. Effective management of the HSC is positively related to the firms' sustainable performance, thus helping managers make the organisation sustainable in the long term.

Practical implications

The research extends the literature of Halal and supply chain management by proposing Halal as a standard quality control system, which focuses on wholesome consumption. Effective management of the HSC is positively related to the sustainable performance of the firms, thus helps managers in making the organisation sustainable in the long term.

Originality/value

The result of the study underlines that sustainable performance measures are embedded in HSCM. This research develops a new paradigm in the research of HSCM and sustainability.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Abid Haleem, Mohd Imran Khan and Shahbaz Khan

Need for effective adoption of halal certification through assessment and accreditation (HCAA) is imperative for the higher level of customer satisfaction. To achieve…

Abstract

Purpose

Need for effective adoption of halal certification through assessment and accreditation (HCAA) is imperative for the higher level of customer satisfaction. To achieve this, all stakeholders need to be involved in developing the policy. Thus, this study aims to identify barriers to the adoption of HCAA and analyses through structural model of interrelated barriers

Design/methodology/approach

The structural and hierarchical model of barriers to the adoption of HCAA is developed after extensive systematic literature survey along with opinions from various types of experts. Interpretive structural modelling is identified as the appropriate tool in making this model, which is further analysed using MICMAC (Matriced’ Impacts croises-multipication applique’ and classment). Corresponding issues for every barrier as identified may help in further developing the action plan for each stakeholder. Objectives and action plan for various stakeholders were evolved and provided.

Findings

The significant finding indicates to developing a globally accepted halal certifying organisation, as to contain the mislabelling, and this further needs extensive government and customer support. The customer needs to be more aware of the proper idea of halal. Therefore, to succeed, the industry needs to develop a brand identity with a distinct/unique/clear marketing message, not just certifying products/services as halal.

Originality/value

Specific direction for different stakeholders has been derived along with academic finding for researchers and to further develop the action plan.

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2019

Shahbaz Khan, Mohd Imran Khan, Abid Haleem and Abdur Rahman Jami

Risk in the Halal food supply chain is considered as the failure to deliver the product which complies with Halal standards. The purpose of this paper is to identify the…

Abstract

Purpose

Risk in the Halal food supply chain is considered as the failure to deliver the product which complies with Halal standards. The purpose of this paper is to identify the risk elements associated with Halal food supply chains and prioritise them appropriately towards better management.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used a systematic literature review to identify various risk elements in the Halal food supply chain and consolidate them with the expertise of professionals and academicians. Further, the fuzzy analytic hierarchical process (fuzzy AHP) is applied to prioritise the identified risk elements.

Findings

The findings of the research suggest that “supply-related risks” are the most prominent risk. Raw material integrity issue is a vital element in the Halal food supply chain. The failure of the supplier to deliver material that complies with Halal standards reduces the industrial economic advantage. This study recommends that the integration of internal processes and outsourcing elements can mitigate the risk of the Halal food supply chain by having a holistic view of the processing and delivery of Halal foods.

Research limitations/implications

Systematic literature review and experts’ opinion are used to identify and consolidate risks. For the literature review, only the SCOPUS database is used; thus, there is a chance to overlook some risk elements. Additionally, the fuzzy AHP analysis depends on relative preference weight. Therefore, care should be taken while constructing a pairwise comparison matrix for risk elements.

Practical implications

The findings of the study can help the managers who have a holistic view on risk mitigation of the Halal food supply chain. This study may assist managers to share information about the processing of Halal food from top to bottom to manage risk.

Originality/value

This study may act as a baseline for undertaking future research in the area of risk management of the Halal food supply chain.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Abid Haleem and Mohd Imran Khan

The purpose of this paper is to understand the major critical success factors (CSFs), which are instrumental for effective adoption and implementation of Halal logistics…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the major critical success factors (CSFs), which are instrumental for effective adoption and implementation of Halal logistics (HL) in Halal supply chain (HSC) environment.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 15 CSFs/CSF clusters were identified and used to develop an interpretive structural modelling-based hierarchal and structural model. Further, analysis categorises driving and dependence power of factors. MICMAC has been undertaken to analyse how these CSFs and their hierarchies relate, with paths and levels.

Findings

It was found that there is a need to develop proper guidelines, standards and codes, to train the Halal logisticians. Robust ICT and its appropriate implementation seems as the backbone of the HSC. HL emerges as a key component for the Halal industry to succeed, and the same is required to extend the integrity of the Halal products from the farm to the fork. That’s to develop Halal as an intrinsic characteristic. Thus, organisations should have support from specific CSFs. The paper provides managerial implications, recommendations for effective implementation of HL and further in identifying the pull effect of HL.

Research limitations/implications

The model so developed is contextual and based on the perception of qualified experts, and they can have biasness of Halal meat supply chain.

Originality/value

An academic research taking views from different stakeholders with findings valuable to researchers and the policy planners.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2019

Abdul Hafaz Ngah, T. Ramayah, Mohd Helmi Ali and Mohd Imran Khan

This study aims to identify the factors influencing the decision to the Halal transportation adoption among pharmaceuticals and cosmetics manufacturers.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the factors influencing the decision to the Halal transportation adoption among pharmaceuticals and cosmetics manufacturers.

Design/methodology/approach

Base on the technology-organization-environment (TOE) framework, applying the purposive sampling method, data were gathered from questionnaires distributed to the participants of Malaysia International Halal Showcase (MIHAS) and Halal festival (Halfest). Out of 110 questionnaires distributed, only 97 data from 102 respondents could be used for further analysis. SMART-PLS 3.2.7 was used to analyze the data for this study using a structural equation modeling approach.

Findings

Perceived benefits, competitive pressure (COMP) and customer pressure were found to have a significant relationship with the intention to adopt Halal warehousing services, the organizational readiness was found to be a not significant factor in the adoption of Halal transportation. Top management attitudes (TMAs) moderate the positive relationship between COMP and the intention to adopt Halal transportation services.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses on the Halal manufacturers in the pharmaceuticals and cosmetics industry who attended MIHAS and Halfest, which still not adopting Halal transportation activities.

Practical implications

The findings provide useful information to a better understanding of the factors influencing the adoption of Halal transportation among Malaysian Halal cosmetics and pharmaceutical manufacturers. Related parties such as the government, the Halal transport service providers and the customers could use these findings to plan further action to enhance the adoption of Halal transport adoption.

Originality/value

The study revealed the capability of the TOE framework to identify the factors influencing the decision to adopt Halal transportation among Malaysian Halal cosmetics and pharmaceutical manufacturers. TMA was found to have a moderation effect on the relationship between COMP and the intention to adopt Halal transportation.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 February 2019

Shahbaz Khan, Mohd Imran Khan and Abid Haleem

Higher level of customer satisfaction for halal products can be achieved by the effective adoption of halal certification through assessment and accreditation (HCAA)…

Abstract

Purpose

Higher level of customer satisfaction for halal products can be achieved by the effective adoption of halal certification through assessment and accreditation (HCAA). There are certain issues that seem detrimental towards the adoption of HCAA. The purpose of this paper is to identify the major barriers towards the adoption of HCAA and evaluate inter-relationships among them for developing the strategies to mitigate these barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

The barriers towards the adoption of HCAA are identified through an integrative approach of literature review and expert’s opinion. The inter-relationship among the identified barriers is evaluated using fuzzy-based decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (fuzzy DEMATEL) technique, which categorises them into influential and influenced group.

Findings

The evaluation of inter-relationship among barriers using fuzzy DEMATEL indicates four influencing barriers and six influenced barriers towards the adoption of HCAA. Further, findings suggest an extensive government, and management support is vital in terms of commitment, resources and actions to realise the benefits attributed with HCAA.

Research limitations/implications

The inter-relationship among barriers is contextual and based on the perception of experts which may be biased as per their background and area of expertise. This study pertains to a specific region and can be extended to the generalised certification system.

Originality/value

The empirical base of the research provides the inter-relationship among the barriers towards the adoption of HCAA which can be effectively used as input in the decision-making process by producers, manufacturers and distributor. The policy maker can analyse the cause group and effect group of barriers to formulate policies that would help in the adoption of HCAA.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 June 2020

Shahbaz Khan, Abid Haleem and Mohd Imran Khan

In a globalised environment, market volatility makes risk management an essential component of the supply chain. Similar to conventional supply chains, a Halal supply…

Abstract

Purpose

In a globalised environment, market volatility makes risk management an essential component of the supply chain. Similar to conventional supply chains, a Halal supply chain (HSC) is also affected by several factors making it vulnerable to risks. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to identify and analyse the elements of Halal supply chain management (HSCM) and their significant risk dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 72 risk elements of HSCM are identified through a review of contemporary scientific literature along with news items and official websites related to risk management of conventional supply chain management, HSC and sustainable supply chain. Further, 42 risk elements are finalised using fuzzy Delphi and then these risk elements are categorised into 7 dimensions. The interrelationships among the risk dimensions as well as risk elements are developed using fuzzy DEMATEL.

Findings

Results suggest that production, planning, logistic & outsourcing and information technology-related risk are prominent risk dimensions. The causal relationships among the significant risk dimensions and elements related to the HSCM may help managers and policy planners.

Research limitations/implications

This study faces a challenge due to inadequate availability of the literature related to risk management in the area of HSCM. Further, this study has used inputs from experts, which can be biased.

Originality/value

To the best of the author's knowledge, it is the first comprehensive study towards investigating the interrelationships among the risks in the context of the HSCM.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 21 January 2020

Abid Haleem, Mohd Imran Khan, Shahbaz Khan and Abdur Rahman Jami

Halal is an emerging business sector and is steadily gaining popularity among scholars and practitioners. The purpose of this paper is to critically evaluate and review…

Abstract

Purpose

Halal is an emerging business sector and is steadily gaining popularity among scholars and practitioners. The purpose of this paper is to critically evaluate and review the reported literature in the broad area of Halal using bibliometric technique and network analysis tools. Moreover, this paper also proposes future research directions in the field of Halal.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper employed a systematic review technique followed by bibliometric analysis to gain insight and to evaluate the research area associated with Halal. Furthermore, data mining techniques are used for analysing the concerned article title, keywords and abstract of 946 research articles obtained through the Scopus database. Finally, network analysis is used to identify significant research clusters.

Findings

This study reports top authors contributing to this area, the key sub-research areas and the influential works based on citations and PageRank. We identified from the citation analysis that major influential works of Halal are from the subject area of biological science and related areas. Further, this study reports established and emerging research clusters, which provide future research directions.

Research limitations/implications

Scopus database is used to conduct a systematic review and corresponding bibliometric study; the authors might have missed some peer-reviewed studies not reported in Scopus. The selection of keywords for article search may not be accurate for the multi-disciplinary Halal area. Also, the authors have not considered the banking/financial aspects of Halal. The proposed four research clusters may inform potential researcher towards supporting the industry.

Originality/value

The novelty of the study is that no published study has reported the bibliometric study and network analysis techniques in the area of Halal.

Details

Modern Supply Chain Research and Applications, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-3871

Keywords

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