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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2019

Abdul Hafaz Ngah, T. Ramayah, Mohd Helmi Ali and Mohd Imran Khan

This study aims to identify the factors influencing the decision to the Halal transportation adoption among pharmaceuticals and cosmetics manufacturers.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the factors influencing the decision to the Halal transportation adoption among pharmaceuticals and cosmetics manufacturers.

Design/methodology/approach

Base on the technology-organization-environment (TOE) framework, applying the purposive sampling method, data were gathered from questionnaires distributed to the participants of Malaysia International Halal Showcase (MIHAS) and Halal festival (Halfest). Out of 110 questionnaires distributed, only 97 data from 102 respondents could be used for further analysis. SMART-PLS 3.2.7 was used to analyze the data for this study using a structural equation modeling approach.

Findings

Perceived benefits, competitive pressure (COMP) and customer pressure were found to have a significant relationship with the intention to adopt Halal warehousing services, the organizational readiness was found to be a not significant factor in the adoption of Halal transportation. Top management attitudes (TMAs) moderate the positive relationship between COMP and the intention to adopt Halal transportation services.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses on the Halal manufacturers in the pharmaceuticals and cosmetics industry who attended MIHAS and Halfest, which still not adopting Halal transportation activities.

Practical implications

The findings provide useful information to a better understanding of the factors influencing the adoption of Halal transportation among Malaysian Halal cosmetics and pharmaceutical manufacturers. Related parties such as the government, the Halal transport service providers and the customers could use these findings to plan further action to enhance the adoption of Halal transport adoption.

Originality/value

The study revealed the capability of the TOE framework to identify the factors influencing the decision to adopt Halal transportation among Malaysian Halal cosmetics and pharmaceutical manufacturers. TMA was found to have a moderation effect on the relationship between COMP and the intention to adopt Halal transportation.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Kim Hua Tan, Mohd Helmi Ali, Zafir Mohd Makhbul and Azman Ismail

Much has been written about the importance of external integration for the integrity of food products. To achieve food integrity, all actors along the supply chain have to…

Abstract

Purpose

Much has been written about the importance of external integration for the integrity of food products. To achieve food integrity, all actors along the supply chain have to be fully integrated and comply with an assurance system or process. The more complex the supply chain operations are, the greater will be the need for integration. This research paper investigates the impact of external integration on compliance with halal standards, as an example of product integrity within the food industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 1,000 food manufacturers was conducted. Partial least squares structural equation modelling was used to test the effect of external integration on compliance with halal standards.

Findings

The results showed that there were links between halal assurance system and external integration. Nevertheless, it was discovered that only customer integration mediated the relationship between the halal assurance system and product quality and production cost.

Practical implications

The practical implications of the findings extend to managers in the food industry who might pursue supply chain integration as a structure to achieve excellence. The findings suggested that the deployment of a halal assurance system has a positive effect on operational performance. Furthermore, the results show that managers who wish to implement the halal assurance system should carefully invest in an external integration strategy, depending upon the operational performance improvement intended.

Originality/value

This research is one of the first studies to investigate the effects of external integration on halal food in general and is the first empirical investigation of the effect of safeguarding halal integrity on operational performance.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 February 2021

Mohd Helmi Ali, Mohammad Iranmanesh, Kim Hua Tan, Suhaiza Zailani and Nor Asiah Omar

The current complex halal food supply chain (SC) has caused food scandals, which have illustrated the weakness of multiple food quality standards and certification and…

Abstract

Purpose

The current complex halal food supply chain (SC) has caused food scandals, which have illustrated the weakness of multiple food quality standards and certification and audits in ensuring food safety. Drawn on the resource-based view (RBV) theory, the purpose of this study is to explore the impacts of SC integration (SCI) on halal food SC integrity and, consequently, food quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data were collected from 275 halal-certified food companies in Malaysia and analysed using structural equation modelling – SmartPLS3.0.

Findings

The results confirmed that SCI, including internal, supplier and customer integrations, has significant effects on the dimensions of the halal food SC integrity which, in turn, lead to halal food safety and quality.

Practical implications

The importance of SCI in halal food SC is highlighted in this study. The impact of SCI is contexted in halal food SC integrity and food quality. Therefore, it provides a clear understanding to managers of SC applicability in the halal food industry.

Originality/value

Based on the RBV theory, this study contributes to the limited body of research of the relationships among SCI from the context of the halal industry with a specific focus on food supply chain integrity and food quality.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Mohd Helmi Ali, Kim Hua Tan and Md Daud Ismail

The purpose of this paper is to propose a food supply chain (SC) integrity framework in the context of halal food.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a food supply chain (SC) integrity framework in the context of halal food.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a discussion on the development of food SC integrity framework using triangulation of interviews’ insights with literature.

Findings

Current industry practices such as standards have not been sufficient in embracing the concept of food SC integrity. As the food SC is complex, food SC integrity framework is proposed as a solution. This paper proposes food SC integrity framework for halal food. It consists of four dimensions, namely: raw material, production, service, and information integrity. In addition, key elements for each dimension are derived from the interviews’ insights.

Research limitations/implications

The framework provides the evidence that the safeguarding of halal food integrity does not rely solely on certification; but it requires an extensive effort beyond certification.

Practical implications

Safeguarding of food integrity should involve all stages and actors of the SC. Religious standards should incorporate SC integrity profiling through a controlling mechanism to promote higher food product integrity.

Originality/value

Food SC integrity framework is important to religious food as it plays a significant role to the population. This study contributes to a newly developed SC integrity framework in the context of halal food.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Mohd Helmi Ali, Yuanzhu Zhan, Syed Shah Alam, Ying Kei Tse and Kim Hua Tan

The purpose of this paper is to establish a conceptual model adopted from a strategy-structure-performance paradigm for investigating the fit between the supply chain…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish a conceptual model adopted from a strategy-structure-performance paradigm for investigating the fit between the supply chain integration and halal food supply chain integrity and the impact of halal food supply chain integrity on firms’ performance in a Malaysian context.

Design/methodology/approach

This study comprises a sample of a halal manufacturing firm in Malaysia. A cross-sectional research design was used in this study. Data were gathered based on mailed and personally administered questionnaires. SmartPLS was used to analyse the 254 valid responses.

Findings

The research findings indicate that internal integration and strategy have positive impact on halal food supply chain integrity. The study results confirmed that customer integration and supplier integration contributes to halal food supply chain integrity. It also finds that halal food supply chain integrity has a significantly positive impact.

Research limitations/implications

The results suggested that a strategic collaboration with the supplier pivoted around the quality and integrity of the raw materials should be undertaken.

Practical implications

The results from this study supports that the managers should adopt all halal food supply chain integrity components to achieve a superior performance. Even though some of the components did not yield significant results in terms of their relationships with firms’ performance, these dimensions were generally related to the standardised industry requirements, such as certifications.

Originality/value

The findings are original and unique and are based on established theories from the literature on supply chain management practices. The research findings are useful to academics and policymakers interested in fostering a halal supply chain in Malaysia.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 117 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Norafni @ Farlina binti Rahim

Islamic finance and Halal product sectors are thriving successfully. This chapter is a general review of the perception of Asian consumers on Islamic finance and Halal…

Abstract

Purpose

Islamic finance and Halal product sectors are thriving successfully. This chapter is a general review of the perception of Asian consumers on Islamic finance and Halal sectors in the global Halal economy.

Methodology/approach

The first section will briefly describe the Halal concept in both Islamic finance and Halal industries, and the growth of both sectors in Asian countries. The second part highlights the review of Asian consumers’ perception towards Islamic finance products and Halal products.

Findings

The review found that the consumers’ perception towards the Islamic finance products and Halal products is distinctive. This is due to the diversity of Asian countries in terms of geography, religion, culture, ethnic, school of thoughts (madzahib), income per capita and government’s involvement.

Originality/value

The third part of the chapter concentrates on planning towards Halal marketing, which involves the move and future challenges in different layers of industries to gear up and strengthen the Halal economy.

Details

Advances in Islamic Finance, Marketing, and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-899-8

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2019

Mahfoudh Abdulkarem Al-Musali, Mohammed Helmi Qeshta, Mohamed Ali Al-Attafi and Abood Mohammad Al-Ebel

The purpose of this study is to report on the level of audit committee (AC) effectiveness on the top capitalized firms in GCC countries and to empirically investigate the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to report on the level of audit committee (AC) effectiveness on the top capitalized firms in GCC countries and to empirically investigate the hypothesized influence of ownership types on the level of AC effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical data were drawn from annual reports of 119 top listed firms in Gulf Co-operation Council (GCC) nations at the end of 2011. Ordinary least squares regression analysis was constructed to examine the relationships between ownership types and the level of AC effectiveness.

Findings

The findings revealed that family, government and institutional ownership, in addition to board independence, all have significant positive association with AC effectiveness, and they serve as a complement to AC effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of the study are important for policy makers and regulators as they could use them to understand the relationship between different corporate governance mechanisms and formulating best strategies that would help them to improve and adopt an optimal governance system constituted from interacting governance mechanisms.

Originality/value

This study is one of few that have examined the interaction between different corporate governance mechanisms. It provides insights about the relationship between AC effectiveness and other governance mechanisms in the GCC context.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 27 February 2021

Sue Chern Ooi, Siti Seri Delima Abdul Malak and Ayoib Che Ahmad

The main objectives of this case are to provide an opportunity for case users to understand the organisational governance framework in a farmers' association and how to…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The main objectives of this case are to provide an opportunity for case users to understand the organisational governance framework in a farmers' association and how to build an effective organisational board. More specifically, the teaching objectives of this case are as follows: to provide an overview of the functions of different types of governance structures in a farmers' association. To understand the importance of good governance practices in a farmers' association and for its stakeholders. To relate democratic theory, stakeholder theory, agency theory and stewardship theory with the governance practices of a farmers' association. To critically evaluate the board governance in a farmers' association and recommend measures to enhance the practices.

Case overview/synopsis

The teaching case presents the governance practices in a farmers' association in Malaysia, ZIX-PPK and the various governance challenges that emerged in the PPK subsequent to the appointment of politically affiliated directors. Prior to 2019, ZIX-PPK was an outstanding PPK under the helm of the General Manager, Khadijah. The PPK had continually been recognised as an exceptional and excellent PPK by the Farmers' Organisation Authority and the Muda Agricultural Development Authority. However, the Arahan Pendaftar Bil 1/2019 required changes to the governance structures of ZIX-PPK, with five new directors being appointed by the minister. The appointment threatened the independence and autonomy of ZIX-PPK and affected the dynamic of the board of directors. Khadijah had to search for measures that could improve the board governance in ZIX-PPK. The names, in this case, had been altered but the details were based on an actual event. The data were collected through interviews with key players and with reference to the minutes and other documentation of ZIX-PPK.

Complexity academic level

The teaching case can be used by students in higher education institutions at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels. The case may also be relevant for training purposes to farmers' associations and any non-profit organisations.

Subject code

CSS 1: Accounting and Finance.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 May 2018

Mohammad Ashraful Ferdous Chowdhury, Chowdhury Shahed Akbar and Mohammad Shoyeb

The purpose of this paper is to examine the linkage between Islamic financing principles and economic growth (EG) by taking into consideration two Islamic Financing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the linkage between Islamic financing principles and economic growth (EG) by taking into consideration two Islamic Financing Principles: Risk Sharing and non-risk sharing separately.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study are obtained from the annual reports of all Islamic banks from Bangladesh using Bank scope database and annual report for the period 1984-2014. The research uses an Autoregressive Distributive Lags (ARDL) approach. For robustness, this study also employs a continuous wavelet transform approach.

Findings

The empirical findings reveal that the risk sharing instruments are positively related to the EG of the country. On the other hand, non-risk sharing instruments are negatively related to the EG of the country.

Research limitations/implications

The dominant use of non-risk sharing-based financing has undermined the greater possibility of Islamic banking to contribute more to the EG of the country. Banks and other financial institutions need to pay greater attention to systemic risk created by risk transfer and apply risk sharing methods of financing more vigorously to achieve greater equity, efficient allocation of resources, stability and growth of the financial system and welfare of the society as a whole.

Originality/value

This study has advanced the knowledge by examining the issue of Islamic financing principles and EG. This is probably one of the first attempts to find the linkage between Islamic financing principles and EG by taking into consideration two portfolios: risk sharing and non-risk sharing separately and provide significant insights for policy makers, market players and academicians.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Mohamed Syazwan Ab Talib and Abu Bakar Abdul Hamid

The purpose of this strengths or weaknesses, and its external opportunities or threats (SWOT) analysis study on Halal logistics industry in Malaysia is to identify SWOT in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this strengths or weaknesses, and its external opportunities or threats (SWOT) analysis study on Halal logistics industry in Malaysia is to identify SWOT in the Halal logistics environment and to uncover strategies to leverage on the strengths and opportunities and rectifying the weaknesses as well as overcoming the threats.

Design/methodology/approach

This study comprises two methods: literature review and interviews. Extensive literature reviews were obtained from leading databases and the articles recorded matches or related with the keywords. In addition, the respondents from the interviews consist of middle- and top-level managers with reputable knowledge, expertise and experience in the Logistics and Halal industry. After the literature was reviewed and information was transcribed from the interviews, reduction techniques were used to group and summarize the variables into the four SWOT categories.

Findings

The SWOT categories, consisting of SWOT, are generated from the literature reviews and supported by the respondents’ views and vice versa. Examples of SWOT analyses done are as follows: strength (strong government support), weakness (inconsistent Halal definition), opportunity (Muslims’ population growth) and threat (no uniformity on Halal standards).

Research limitations/implications

The SWOT analysis done for this study only demonstrates the internal and external environments and not the assumption that they are certain to be correct, as they contain every imaginable matter in relation to Halal logistics. Plus, the analysis done does not show how to achieve competitive advantage, merely as a guideline and the SWOT analysis done may be outdated as the environments are constantly changing.

Practical implications

The study hopes to contribute in future studies and act as a guide for the Halal logistics players to have better understanding in their business environment.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind, to incorporate SWOT and Halal logistics. Hence, this study will add in more value to the existing academic research done on SWOT analysis and broadening the Halal and logistics business understanding, not only in Malaysia but globally as well.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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