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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

MOHAN M KUMARASWAMY

The findings from a set of related investigations into construction megaproject management were integrated into models, frameworks and basic guidelines that would help to…

Abstract

The findings from a set of related investigations into construction megaproject management were integrated into models, frameworks and basic guidelines that would help to improve and integrate (1) work packaging, (2) project participant selection and (3) operational management subsystems. More creative approaches to work packaging and participant selection were seen to significantly support construction industry development and the consequent longer‐term benefits in developing countries. A paradigm of ‘technology exchange’ is proposed as the basis of more viable and mutually beneficial joint ventures which would also facilitate the innovative packaging and integrated management of megaprojects in developing countries. Additionally, it is recommended that hitherto isolated initiatives related to quality, safety or dispute resolution/avoidance should be integrated into synergistic management systems which also incorporate built‐in monitoring and evaluation sub‐systems. In turn, the latter would trigger both short‐ and long‐term remedial measures related to improved project packaging, for example, as well as to personnel training and organizational development programmes.

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Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

MOHAN M. KUMARASWAMY

It is necessary and useful to differentiate destructive from constructive conflict and avoidable from necessary claims; and also to minimize disputes arising from…

Abstract

It is necessary and useful to differentiate destructive from constructive conflict and avoidable from necessary claims; and also to minimize disputes arising from unresolved conflict and claims in construction projects. This paper analyses such needs and proposes means of meeting them through an appropriate classification of construction claims; an estimation of their relative significance in terms of magnitude and frequency; and an identification of the proximate and root causes of the significant claims. A hierarchy of such claims, proximate and root causes is presented, based mainly on data collected from 61 projects and on 46 responses to questionnaires in Hong Kong. Measures of the relative significance of the claims categories are also presented. The results are reinforced by observations from parallel studies in Hong Kong and elsewhere, as well as from the literature. Strategies are suggested to avoid the avoidable and mitigate the unavoidable or unavoided claims, through controlling the controllable causes. Management focus is also recommended on controlling the causes of those categories of claims and disputes that are seen to be significant in terms of higher impact and/or probability of occurrence.

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Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Abstract

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Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

SUNIL M. DISSANAYAKA and MOHAN M. KUMARASWAMY

Time and cost are usually critical to construction clients. Given the many contributory factors, improved quantitative models of time and cost may help clients to predict…

Abstract

Time and cost are usually critical to construction clients. Given the many contributory factors, improved quantitative models of time and cost may help clients to predict project outcomes at the outset, and also at different stages of the project life span. These can also help to compare deviations in significant contributory factors, and to suggest corrective actions. Multiple linear regression (MLR) and artificial neural networks (ANN) were applied in developing such quantitative models in a research project based in Hong Kong. A comparative study indicated that ANN had better prediction capabilities than MLR by itself. Significant factors identified through quantitative models developed, indicated that time over‐run levels were mainly governed by non‐procurement related factors (e.g. project characteristics and client/client representative characteristics), while cost over‐run levels were significantly influenced by both procurement and non‐procurement related factors (e.g. project characteristics, client/client representative characteristics and contractual payment modalities). A parallel approach yielded interesting comparisons of the variations of mean time and cost over‐runs, when comparing groups of projects using different procurement sub‐systems, from the Hong Kong sample.

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Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2007

Mohan M. Kumaraswamy, Florence Y.Y. Ling, Aaron M. Anvuur and M. Motiar Rahman

This paper targets the development of comprehensive approaches to prequalifying teams for Public Private Partnerships (PPPs).

Abstract

Purpose

This paper targets the development of comprehensive approaches to prequalifying teams for Public Private Partnerships (PPPs).

Design/methodology/approach

Research outcomes from a study into “relationally integrated project teams” (RIPTs) were applied to necessarily longer‐term PPP scenarios. A force field model was developed to visualise the importance of stronger relational forces between the many PPP participants for “sustainable RIPTs” (SRITs). A framework was conceptualised to show linkages from relational contracting approaches, through sustainable relationships to sustainable infrastructure. This framework and a basic model for evaluating relational performance, were assessed by a panel of international PPP experts.

Findings

The results encouraged the collection of factors facilitating successful relationships to build the proposed knowledge base. Literature review and initial interviews provide examples of priorities and lessons learned in relationship building in ongoing PPPs.

Research limitations/implications

Being an integrative theory‐building type exercise bringing together relational contracting, teambuilding and PPP performance research streams, this paper summarises and refers to, rather than provides details of, feeder research. Fleshing out the conceptual framework and model will next proceed beyond the initial testing and sample knowledge elements conveyed herein.

Practical implications

Selecting good teams is essential for successful projects, and more so for PPP projects, given their complexities and longer timeframes. Increasing reliance on PPPs for infrastructure development and asset management enhances this significance.

Originality/value

Synergies are derived from linking relationship‐building and sustainability thrusts in the context of PPP performance. Concepts of “sustainable relationships” and “sustainsivity” (sensitivity to sustainability issues) are introduced.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2019

E.M.A.C. Ekanayake, Geoffrey Shen and Mohan M. Kumaraswamy

The purpose of this paper is to review the state-of-the-art of literature of value management (VM) and to map the VM domain to provide a launch pad for further knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the state-of-the-art of literature of value management (VM) and to map the VM domain to provide a launch pad for further knowledge development and dissemination.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed CiteSpace bibliometric analysis software to systematically, comprehensively and accurately review the VM-related literature and to map the VM knowledge domain.

Findings

The results reveal the current VM knowledge base, clusters, research hotspot, and the evolutionary trajectory while contributing to the development of VM knowledge by providing a dynamic platform for integrating future developments in research.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper to scientific VM knowledge is, therefore, a quantitative and accurate VM knowledge map based on a bibliometric analysis of data from the VM knowledge base, domains and evolution. The findings can be generalised and used as an effective knowledge mapping tool in a specific field of study that could complement and add significant value to the often adopted more traditional literature reviews. This study further recommends that the proposed knowledge map be frequently updated by similar future studies to fill gaps that arise with changing needs, priorities and contexts, as well as to identify corresponding future demands in the VM research domain.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

MOHAN M. KUMARASWAMY

Construction organizations have responded in different ways to the increasing demands for quality. An interim assessment of the benefits and costs of different approaches…

Abstract

Construction organizations have responded in different ways to the increasing demands for quality. An interim assessment of the benefits and costs of different approaches is useful in determining future directions for organizations that have already, or are about to, set up construction quality management systems. Evidence from a series of surveys in Hong Kong indicates that long term strategies are needed, for example targeting ‘total quality management’ or comprehensive quality management systems, with ISO 9000 certification being only one step along this route. Specific issues to be addressed are identified, such as the development of construction‐specific guidelines and the integration of safety and dispute avoidance systems in a comprehensive quality management system. A framework is also proposed to assist in selecting the optimal quality management route for a given construction organization. Lessons learned from Hong Kong and elsewhere can be incorporated in this framework, and will help separate rhetoric from reality in rationalizing the quality management strategies of construction organizations.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2020

E.M.A.C. Ekanayake, Geoffrey Shen and Mohan M. Kumaraswamy

Industrialized construction (IC) has accelerated the technological advancements of construction supply chains (SCs) in Hong Kong (HK). However, the usually fragmented IC…

Abstract

Purpose

Industrialized construction (IC) has accelerated the technological advancements of construction supply chains (SCs) in Hong Kong (HK). However, the usually fragmented IC SCs often lead to friction and turbulence that retard their performance. Streamlining these workflows call for resilient SCs that can proactively overcome various vulnerabilities and avoid disruptions. Having identified supply chain capabilities (SCC) as essential precursors to supply chain resilience (SCR), this paper reports on a vital segment of a study on SCC for IC in HK that focused here on critical SCC (CSCC). Specifically, this paper aims at identifying and probing the CSCC for improving SCR in IC in HK.

Design/methodology/approach

After drawing on the plentiful relevant literature, an empirical study using a questionnaire survey and interviews was conducted following the multi-stage methodological framework of this study. Relevant significance analysis of the collected data enabled the selection of CSCC. Next, factor analysis facilitated grouping them under nine underlying components.

Findings

The results reveal 41 CSCC pertinent to achieve resilient SCs in IC in HK under critical capability components of resourcefulness, flexibility, capacity, adaptability, efficiency, financial strength, visibility, anticipation and dispersion.

Originality/value

It is expected that industry practitioners would benefit from prior knowledge of CSCC and their levels of criticalities, so as to prioritize integrating them suitably into SC processes, to develop value-enhanced-resilient SCs. Further, these findings lay the foundations for developing a powerful evaluation model to assess, then improve, SCR in IC in HK by mapping the identified CSCC with relevant critical vulnerabilities, based on study outcomes.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Mohan M. Kumaraswamy, Aaron M. Anvuur and Hedley J. Smyth

The paper seeks to consider relational integration across a network of organisational members. To this end, “relationally integrated value networks” (RIVANS) are…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to consider relational integration across a network of organisational members. To this end, “relationally integrated value networks” (RIVANS) are conceptualised to engage and empower network members towards well‐focused collaboration that adds value. The aim is to identify the routes towards achieving the desirable integration together with the desired “overall value” that includes the hitherto often neglected “whole life” and end‐user priorities.

Design/methodology/approach

Two case studies of enlightened team working are used to examine the power of RIVANS to add value. Deliberations at two subsequent workshops identified the potential for furthering the RIVANS approach and operationalising the value propositions.

Findings

Relational integration in networks adds considerable value to projects. Cross‐fertilisation benefits accrue when RIVANS members also participate in other value networks that also include other facilities managers.

Research limitations/implications

Relational agendas have grown steadily over the last 15 years. There is scope for further development for benefits of clients and the supply network. This is despite an apparent retreat from a focus on differentiation to a re‐emerging cost focus.

Practical implications

Each network can benefit from healthy inputs from, and benchmarking against, other networks. The strengths of each network will be enhanced by the steady development of each of its members, mutual feedback and collaborative learning opportunities.

Originality/value

The need for, and potential impact of RIVANS are heightened in the present major economic downturn. Relationally integrated networks can be more resilient, while adding value and building market share through collaborative efficiencies throughout the life cycles of built assets.

Details

Facilities, vol. 28 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2011

Aaron M. Anvuur, Mohan M. Kumaraswamy and Gangadhar Mahesh

Advocacy for the re‐integration of highly differentiated, at times fragmented, construction project “teams” and supply chains has increased in this era of network…

Abstract

Purpose

Advocacy for the re‐integration of highly differentiated, at times fragmented, construction project “teams” and supply chains has increased in this era of network competition, yet industry targets remain elusive. This paper aims to report on findings of research focused on the development and validation of the building‐blocks for relationally integrated value networks (RIVANS) that seeks to redress this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Complementary theoretical streams are identified through an extensive literature review, and are used to shape and inform discussions of the key RIVANS themes of value objectives, network management, learning, and maturity. Four moderated focus groups hosted in each of two workshops in Hong Kong, are used to validate these themes. Each workshop typically comprised thematic focus group sessions in between introductory presentations and a plenary consolidation session.

Findings

The findings indicate strong support for the comprehensive coverage, appropriateness and practical relevance of the key RIVANS themes. The findings also suggest that public sector clients and procuring agents need empowerment to provide adequate leadership and create the environmental contexts required in RIVANS.

Research limitations/implications

The chosen research approach and context may temper the generalisability of the findings reported in this paper. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to test the proposed RIVANS concepts in other contexts.

Practical implications

Implications for the development of basic implementation templates for RIVANS are discussed.

Originality/value

This paper responds to a clearly identified need for integrative value‐based models of competitiveness in construction.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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