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Article
Publication date: 29 October 2018

Mohammed Ismail El-Adly and Amjad Abu ELSamen

This paper aims to measure customer-based brand equity in the context of hotels, and to develop and empirically validate a new scale, named guest-based hotel equity…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to measure customer-based brand equity in the context of hotels, and to develop and empirically validate a new scale, named guest-based hotel equity (GBHE), by incorporating the customer perceived value of hotels as a multidimensional construct in addition to its traditional dimensions (i.e. brand awareness and brand image).

Design/methodology/approach

A structured and self-administered survey was used, targeting 348 hotel guests who were surveyed about their experience with the last hotel they had stayed in during the previous year. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to assess the research constructs dimensions, unidimensionality, convergent and discriminant validity and composite reliability.

Findings

The empirical findings indicate that GBHE is a multidimensional construct with nine dimensions, namely, hotel awareness, hotel overall image and seven dimensions of customer perceived value (i.e. the values of price, quality, self-gratification, aesthetics, prestige, transaction and hedonism). The new scale is found to have excellent psychometric properties; it has demonstrated its predictive power on behavioral intentions.

Research limitations/implications

Although the authors believe that the sample size was reasonable and adequate for conducting CFA analysis, a bigger sample would be better and might increase the robustness of the proposed scale. In addition, to avoid the retrieval failure problem, hotel guests should be surveyed just after their stay in the hotel or not long afterwards. Further, the hotel classification or hotel star rating was not considered in developing and validating the GBHE scale.

Practical implications

The findings of this study provide hotel managers with a new tool to use in assessing the experiential value of the hotel brand equity, other than conventional hotel awareness and brand image. Further, using the multidimensional construct of perceived value provides hotel managers with more insights into what aspects of hotel brand equity they should focus on to influence the behavioral intentions of their guests.

Originality/value

The originality of this research is highlighted in several points. First, it develops and empirically validates a new scale to measure customer-based brand equity in the hotel context, that is, GBHE. Second, it incorporates the customer perceived value of hotels not as a unidimensional construct that is concerned only with cost, but as a multi-dimensional construct which includes in the GBHE scale dimensions that are both cognitive (i.e. of price and quality) and affective (i.e. of self-gratification, aesthetics, prestige, transaction and hedonism) in addition to its traditional dimensions (i.e. brand awareness and brand image). Third, it assesses the predictive power and relative importance of the GBHE dimensions for behavioral intentions (i.e. loyalty to hotels). Finally, no research has been done so far on the brand equity of hotels in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), although it is considered a fertile soil for tourism in the Arabian region.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Mohammed Ismail El-Adly and Riyad Eid

The purpose of this paper is to identify customers’ perceived value constructs of shopping malls from the perspective of Muslim shoppers and to develop items for measuring…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify customers’ perceived value constructs of shopping malls from the perspective of Muslim shoppers and to develop items for measuring these constructs, empirically validate the scale, and carry out an initial investigation of the effect of these dimensions on behavioural outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

By means of a multi-dimensional procedure on a sample of 329 Muslim mall shoppers in the UAE, the authors have developed a scale of measurement of these shoppers’ perceived value of malls through grouping 30 value items into eight dimensions.

Findings

The study constructed and validated a scale of perceived value of malls taking into consideration the mall shopper’s religion (i.e. Islam). The authors name this new scale Muslim MALLVAL. This scale demonstrates that, like any other shoppers, Muslims who shop in malls assess the shopping experience through both cognitive and affective values in addition to the Islamic value of the mall. The study in addition reveals that the dimensions of Muslim MALLVAL have significant positive influences on behavioural outcomes such as willingness to continue shopping and recommendation of the mall to others.

Research limitations/implications

This study is carried out on Muslim shoppers in the UAE context. However, the authors urge other researchers to replicate the study and get replies from different countries and in particular to use the measures developed in this study to test their robustness.

Practical implications

Muslim mall shoppers evaluate not only the traditional aspects of mall value but also the religious identity related aspects that contribute to the value creation. Therefore, mall developers and managers who target Muslim shoppers (residents and/or tourists) should create and maintain the appropriate shopping environment for Muslim shoppers.

Originality/value

This study is the first to provide an integrative scale for the perceived value of shopping malls from the perspective of Muslim shoppers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Mohammed Ismail El‐Adly

The paper aims to determine the attractiveness factors of UAE shopping malls from the shoppers' perspective and then to segment shoppers according to these attractiveness factors.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to determine the attractiveness factors of UAE shopping malls from the shoppers' perspective and then to segment shoppers according to these attractiveness factors.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of university staff and principal component factor analysis were used to identify shopping mall attractiveness factors. Segmentation approach using K‐means cluster analysis was also used to segment mall shoppers due to the identified factors.

Findings

This study revealed six mall attractiveness factors from the shoppers' perspective: comfort, entertainment, diversity, mall essence, convenience, and luxury. It also arrived at three mall shopper segments, specifically, relaxed shoppers, demanding shoppers, and pragmatic shoppers. Each segment was profiled in terms of mall attractiveness attributes, demographics and shopping behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited in that it surveyed UAE University staff as shoppers. Thus, findings may not be representative of UAE shoppers in general.

Practical implications

Identifying mall attractiveness factors for a segmented market gives a better understanding about patronage motives than when it is applied to the market as a whole. This enables mall managers to develop the appropriate retailing strategies to satisfy each segment.

Originality/value

This is the first study to provide an insight of mall attractiveness factors as identified by different shopper segments in an Arabian environment without ignoring the special cultural differences in the UAE.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 35 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Mohammed Ismail El‐Adly

The main objective of this study is to identify the determinants of TV ads avoiding behavior between light and heavy avoiders in greater Cairo. To achieve the study…

Abstract

The main objective of this study is to identify the determinants of TV ads avoiding behavior between light and heavy avoiders in greater Cairo. To achieve the study objective, five hypotheses have been developed and tested by such statistical techniques as discriminant analysis, t‐tests, MannWhitney tests, and Chi Square tests. A questionnaire has been designed to collect data from a systematic random sample of adults in social clubs and shopping centers in greater Cairo. The number of usable questionnaires in data analysis was 364. The study findings show that all respondents except 3 were doing one or more of TV ads avoiding behavior. Cognitive avoiding represents the most frequently used avoiding behavior by light and heavy TV ads avoiders. The results also demonstrate that perceptions, attitudes toward advertising, and some motives were determinants of TV ads avoiding behavior. On the other hand, it was found that all demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, except types of channels, were not determinants of TV ads avoiding behavior between light and heavy TV ads avoiders. The study concludes with a number of academic and practical recommendations.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Mohammed Ismail El-Adly and Riyad Eid

The purpose of this paper is to identify the dimensions of a shopper consumption experience at the mall level, in relation to previous research on customer-perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the dimensions of a shopper consumption experience at the mall level, in relation to previous research on customer-perceived value. It aims to identify the customer-perceived value constructs of shopping malls (MALLVAL) and develop items for measuring these constructs, empirically validate the scale, carry out an initial investigation of the relationship, if any, among the MALLVAL dimensions, and discuss useful managerial implications based on the exploratory analysis of the statistical relationships between the various MALLVAL dimensions.

Design/methodology/approach

The constructs were tested and validated by means of a multidimensional procedure on a sample of 368 mall shoppers in the UAE. Amos 19 was used for this purpose.

Findings

The study revealed eight dimensions of MALLVAL: first, hedonic value; second, self-gratification value; third, utilitarian value; fourth, epistemic value; fifth, social interaction value; sixth, spatial convenience value; seventh, transaction value; and eighth, time convenience value.

Research limitations/implications

Although the current sample is big and diverse enough and the findings may be representative, the authors urge other researchers to replicate the study and get replies from different countries and in particular to use the measures developed in this study to test their robustness.

Practical implications

Recognition of the importance of the different dimensions of MALLVAL should encourage mall developers and managers to develop mall attributes and shopping environments that provide the different values that compose MALLVAL.

Originality/value

This study makes a number of contributions to the research on customer-perceived value in the mall context in an Arabian environment by developing and validating a multidimensional scale that consists of more different constructs than hedonic and utilitarian values alone.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 43 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Case study
Publication date: 1 April 2011

Ravindra P. Saxena

Retail marketing management.

Abstract

Subject area

Retail marketing management.

Study level/applicability

Undergraduate management; MA; Master's in Business Administration and Master's in Strategic Marketing programs.

Case overview

Opening of the “Dubai Mall” in November 2008 set a new benchmark in retail history. The mall is considered the largest in the world by space and 6th largest in the world in terms of gross leasable area. The Dubai Mall is the UAE's most ambitious retail launch to date. This case examines how in today's highly competitive retail environment, added-value retailing, experiential retailing, or retailtainment has become a major component of the retail strategy mix to establish a competitive advantage. The new phenomenon of “retailtainment” has caught the momentum worldwide and success of Dubai Mall is the live example of its strategic role in the retail mix. The case also highlights the importance of “good location” in the success of retail establishments, whilst examining primary retail location theories and there relation to the phenomenal success of Dubai Mall.

Expected learning outcomes

Through this case study students will be able to: understand the roles of “entertainment” and “location” in retail mix strategy; analyse the new trend of “retailtainment” and “quality location” in creating value-added services and gaining competitive advantage in global competitive retail environment; ascertain the importance and application of “retailtainment” and “strategic location” in the real world's successful example of “Dubai Mall”; and diagnose the role of these learnt concepts in the retailing strategies practiced by other retail establishments in their cities/country.

Supplementary materials

Teaching note.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Kasim Randeree

The purpose of this paper is to investigate challenges in balancing interoperability, food quality and customer satisfaction in halal food supply chains.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate challenges in balancing interoperability, food quality and customer satisfaction in halal food supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed ethnography and grounded theory research methodologies. Research methods were ethnographic content analysis and document content analysis. The research framework encompassed a range of stakeholder groups connected with the halal food supply chain in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), focussing on Islamic jurisprudence, halal food sector analysis, import regulation compliance, halal food certification (HFC), food production, retailing and consumption.

Findings

The research found that supply chain intermediaries are challenged in balancing interoperability issues around non-unified global certification standards. Consequent variability in customer confidence in halal standards was found.

Research limitations/implications

This research focussed on the internal supply chain in the UAE, with future scope in HFC systems among external supplier nations and wider market research on customer perceptions of halal food integrity.

Practical implications

Transferability of the findings is high; to other halal food markets in particular, as well as supply chain systems for halal products across other Islamic economy sectors, notably halal pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. Aligning the halal ecosystem with trends in healthy eating and environmentalism is also considered.

Originality/value

The paper uniquely explores the halal food sector from the perspective of variant stakeholder disciplines in halal sector governance and operation. It exposes vulnerabilities in halal supply chains in a nation with one of the most demanding and diverse agri-food supply systems in the world.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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