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Article

Atheer Abdullah Mohammed, Abdul Hafeez Baig and Raj Gururajan

The key objective of the study is to understand the best processes that are currently used in managing talent in Australian higher education (AHE) and design a…

Abstract

Purpose

The key objective of the study is to understand the best processes that are currently used in managing talent in Australian higher education (AHE) and design a quantitative measurement of talent management processes (TMPs) for the higher education (HE) sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The three qualitative multi-method studies that are commonly used in empirical studies, namely, brainstorming, focus group discussions and semi-structured individual interviews were considered. Twenty-three individuals from six Australian universities participated in this study.

Findings

The qualitative study explored three key themes and ten subthemes of TMPs that are used in AHE. These were: (1) talent attraction, (2) talent development and (3) talent retention.

Research limitations/implications

This study only targeted one country (Australia) and one sector (HE).

Practical implications

This study offers three major contributions as follows: theoretical, practical and policy aspects. Theoretically, the study provides a value-add to Talent Management (TM) theory through designing a guide (conceptual model) of TMPs for the HE sector. Practically, it collects original qualitative data regarding TM in the HE domain. From a policy point of view, this study adds more debate around adding new ideas to Australian education strategic plans for HE.

Originality/value

This study has a unique methodology because of strengthening the effect of an in-depth case study. For instance, two different techniques were used for data analysis for the same research objective as follows: (1) both manual methods and content analysis software (NVivo 11) and (2) the three-stage approach. Using these techniques for the same purpose in one study can provide greater flexibility to examine the relationship between theory and data.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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Abstract

Purpose

Researchers have been trying to identify different psychological attributes which influence entrepreneurial intention (EI) and role of entrepreneurial education and training programs to develop these attributes among women. Therefore, the purpose of this study is twofold: firstly, to evaluate the difference among psychological attributes before and after an entrepreneurial education and training program. Secondly, to examine the effects of psychological attributes on EI among female students in Saudi Arabia.

Design/methodology/approach

A detailed program was designed with the combination of entrepreneurial education and training program throughout a 14-week semester. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire from 310 female university students studying in a Saudi university and participated in this program. SPSS, version 20, was used to analyze the data.

Findings

Entrepreneurial education and training programs based on active learning and learner-centered approaches play an important role to significantly improve the level of psychological attributes and EI of female students. Furthermore, findings of this study also suggest that psychological attributes (training retention, self-confidence, tolerance of ambiguity, innovativeness and achievement motivation) positively influence EI.

Originality/value

Previous studies only focused on relationship testing among psychological attributes and EI. This research proposes strategies to design entrepreneurial education and training program to improve psychological attributes and EI which can be considered practical version of EntreComp conceptual model.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article

Jenna M. Evans and G. Ross Baker

Health service organizations and professionals are under increasing pressure to work together to deliver integrated patient care. A common understanding of integration…

Abstract

Purpose

Health service organizations and professionals are under increasing pressure to work together to deliver integrated patient care. A common understanding of integration strategies may facilitate the delivery of integrated care across inter‐organizational and inter‐professional boundaries. This paper aims to build a framework for exploring and potentially aligning multiple stakeholder perspectives of systems integration.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw from the literature on shared mental models, strategic management and change, framing, stakeholder management, and systems theory to develop a new construct, Mental Models of Integrated Care (MMIC), which consists of three types of mental models, i.e. integration‐task, system‐role, and integration‐belief.

Findings

The MMIC construct encompasses many of the known barriers and enablers to integrating care while also providing a comprehensive, theory‐based framework of psychological factors that may influence inter‐organizational and inter‐professional relations. While the existing literature on integration focuses on optimizing structures and processes, the MMIC construct emphasizes the convergence and divergence of stakeholders' knowledge and beliefs, and how these underlying cognitions influence interactions (or lack thereof) across the continuum of care.

Practical implications

MMIC may help to: explain what differentiates effective from ineffective integration initiatives; determine system readiness to integrate; diagnose integration problems; and develop interventions for enhancing integrative processes and ultimately the delivery of integrated care.

Originality/value

Global interest and ongoing challenges in integrating care underline the need for research on the mental models that characterize the behaviors of actors within health systems; the proposed framework offers a starting point for applying a cognitive perspective to health systems integration.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article

Jenna M. Evans, G. Ross Baker, Whitney Berta and Jan Barnsley

Large-scale change involves modifying not only the structures and functions of multiple organizations, but also the mindsets and behaviours of diverse stakeholders. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Large-scale change involves modifying not only the structures and functions of multiple organizations, but also the mindsets and behaviours of diverse stakeholders. This paper focuses on the latter: the informal, less visible, and often neglected psychological and social factors implicated in change efforts. The purpose of this paper is to differentiate between the concepts of organizational culture and mental models, to argue for the value of applying a shared mental models (SMM) framework to large-scale change, and to suggest directions for future research.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors provide an overview of SMM theory and use it to explore the dynamic relationship between culture and cognition. The contributions and limitations of the theory to change efforts are also discussed.

Findings

Culture and cognition are complementary perspectives, providing insight into two different levels of the change process. SMM theory draws attention to important questions that add value to existing perspectives on large-scale change. The authors outline these questions for future research and argue that research and practice in this domain may be best served by focusing less on the potentially narrow goal of “achieving consensus” and more on identifying, understanding, and managing cognitive convergences and divergences as part of broader research and change management programmes.

Originality/value

Drawing from both cultural and cognitive paradigms can provide researchers with a more complete picture of the processes by which coordinated action are achieved in complex change initiatives in the healthcare domain.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article

Jihad Mohammad, Farzana Quoquab, Fazli Idris, Mohammed Al-Jabari, Nazimah Hussin and Raed Wishah

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between Islamic work ethic (IWE) and employees’ attitude and behaviour in term of perceived organisational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between Islamic work ethic (IWE) and employees’ attitude and behaviour in term of perceived organisational justice, psychological ownership (PSY), and employees’ performance in the Islamic financial institutions in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a sample of 301 employees of Islamic financial institutions and employed structural equation modelling-partial least square technique in order to analyse the data.

Findings

The findings demonstrated that IWE has both direct and indirect effects on attitudinal as well as behavioural outcomes.

Practical implications

Managers who want to enhance their employees’ attitude and behaviour are strongly advised to give proper attention to the concept work ethic. Moreover, they need to conduct training programs to instil these values and to emphasise its crucial role in enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of the organisation.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the body of knowledge on IWE by: testing its ability to predict employees’ performance, their perception of organisational justice, and their feeling of PSY, and examining the mediating effect of perceived organisational justice and PSY between IWE and employees’ performance.

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Book part

Sara A. McComb

Mental model convergence occurs as team members interact. By collecting information and observing behaviors through their interactions, team members’ individual mental…

Abstract

Mental model convergence occurs as team members interact. By collecting information and observing behaviors through their interactions, team members’ individual mental models evolve into shared mental models. This process requires a cognitive shift in an individual's focal level. Specifically, the individual assigned to the team must shift his or her focus from thinking about the team domain using an individual perspective to thinking about it from a team perspective. Thus, mental model convergence may be the key to understanding how individuals are transformed into team members. This chapter presents a framework describing the mental model convergence process that draws on the extant research on group development and information processing. It also examines temporal aspects of mental model convergence, the role of mental model contents on the convergence process, and the relationship between converged mental models and team functioning. Preliminary evidence supporting the framework and the important role that converged mental models play in high-performing teams is provided. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the implications of this mental model convergence framework for research and practice.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Organizations and Time
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1434-8

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Article

Atheer Abdullah Mohammed, Abdul Hafeez Baig and Raj Gururajan

The purpose of this paper is to understand the best processes that are currently used in managing talent in Australian higher education (HE) and to examine the policies in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the best processes that are currently used in managing talent in Australian higher education (HE) and to examine the policies in terms of talent management processes (TMPs) that are derived from objective one. Pragmatic benefits for academic institutions focused on enhancing talent.

Design/methodology/approach

This study selects the mixed method as its research design. In the qualitative study, there were three methods: brainstorming, focus group and individual interviews, followed by the quantitative questionnaire study. The sample consisted of 6 participants for brainstorming, 11 in focus group, 6 individual interviews and 286 participants for the quantitative questionnaire, all conducted in nine Australian universities.

Findings

Three key themes: talent retention, talent development and talent attraction were explored by the qualitative study. The quantitative study tests the level of an importance regarding the three TMPs explored.

Practical implications

This empirical research is one of the first few studies that extended the previous investigation of TMPs in various industries to the HE sector. This research provides more debates for adding more new ideas in the Australian education strategic plans for HE.

Originality/value

This study offers a value-add to talent management literature through designing a quantitative measurement of TMPs for the educational sector. Consequently, there is a deficiency of pragmatic evidence in terms of TMPs in the aforementioned sector. Furthermore, this study provides a clear and comprehensive outline of the extant scholarly research of TMPs from the period 2006–2018.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 69 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Content available
Article

Atheer Abdullah Mohammed, Abdul Hafeez-Baig and Raj Gururajan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate generated themes associated with talent development in the Australian higher education sector. This is because there are…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate generated themes associated with talent development in the Australian higher education sector. This is because there are pragmatic advantages for universities that are focused on developing talents. For example, talent is a primary source of competitive advantage for educational institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

This study depends on the individual interview method as the main tool for data collection. The sample consisted of six participants who are talented. High-level individual interviews were transcribed and thematically analysed using NVivo 11.

Findings

Individual interviews have identified four key themes of talent development: performance management, coaching talent, leadership development and talent acquisition.

Research limitations

This study only targeted one country (Australia), and one sector (higher education). Hence, the generalisability of these results is limited to the Australian university sector in Queensland.

Practical implications

This study collects rich and original qualitative data regarding talent development in the higher education domain. Therefore, for instance, the research findings validate what was already found but are significant because practical data rather than theoretical were gathered through a discussion with experts in talent management. This study has a high quality because of strengthening the effect of an in-depth case study.

Originality/value

The study offers a value added to talent management theory through investigating themes of talent development for the higher education sector. This would assist researchers in this field to provide a deeper understanding and develop a theoretical foundation for their further studies. This implication is unique to the advancement of talent management theory.

Details

Journal of Industry-University Collaboration, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-357X

Keywords

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Article

Yaser Hasan Salem Al-Mamary, Mohammed Abdulrab, Mohammed A. Alwaheeb and Naif Ghazi M. Alshammari

This research intends to contribute to the literature of entrepreneurial intentions through determining the factors impacting the entrepreneurial intentions among students…

Abstract

Purpose

This research intends to contribute to the literature of entrepreneurial intentions through determining the factors impacting the entrepreneurial intentions among students in different academic programs. This is in order to enhance and improve entrepreneurship-related procedures within relevant universities.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted by a structured survey questionnaire on 261 students in the University of Hail. The questionnaire was developed based on previous studies. The proposed hypotheses were tested by the use of the structured equation modeling (SEM) via using Amos software.

Findings

The results of the current study support the theoretical integration of the model as most of the hypotheses have been accepted. The results of the survey also show that attitudes toward behavior, self-efficacy, autonomy, risk-taking, pro-activeness and competitive aggressiveness are expressively related with entrepreneurial intention. Yet, social norms and innovativeness are not considerably connected with entrepreneurial intention.

Research limitations/implications

This study seeks to contribute to the relevant literature by integrating the theory of planned behavior (TPB) and the entrepreneurial orientation model (EO). This is in order to identify the factors impacting the intention of entrepreneurship among Saudi university students. As the case in many studies, this present study has some limitations. The main limitation lies in that it would not be possible to generalize the study's findings. This is due to the fact the research is the outcome of examining and studying one Saudi university. Therefore, it would be better to conduct similar studies in other Saudi universities in order to generalize the findings of the study.

Practical implications

The study's results could be of value to policymakers and university administrators in Saudi Arabia universities by which they could be enabled to allocate resources, develop strategies and provide all requirements for the sake of improving entrepreneurial skills among university students. This comprehensive model can be used as a tool for planning and prioritizing resources in bid for providing the required support as this support would reinforce the entrepreneurial opportunity of university students. As such, students would have better thinking about entrepreneurial work and thus would be assisted in achieving their professional goals and the broader goal of nation building.

Originality/value

Since today's youth are viewed as the potential future entrepreneurs, they should be encouraged to achieve the Saudi Kingdom's goals through creating suitable employment opportunities for them by supporting entrepreneurship. Therefore, pointing out the factors impacting the entrepreneurial intention of students will contribute to developing the field of entrepreneurship among young people in Saudi Arabic in general. In addition, realized outcomes would create an exciting new knowledge with regard to the entrepreneurial intention among the youth at the university level.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 62 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article

Abdul Alem Mohammed

This study aims to investigate the impact of perceived values (hedonic and utilitarian), trust and subjective norms on consumers' purchasing intentions of organic food in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the impact of perceived values (hedonic and utilitarian), trust and subjective norms on consumers' purchasing intentions of organic food in Saudi Arabia; it also explores the moderating influence of availability on the relationship between the intentions of consumers and their actual purchasing behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey with 236 consumers of organic food in Saudi Arabia was carried out. The convergent and discriminant validity of latent variables was confirmed. The relationships among them were tested using Partial Least Square Modelling (PLS).

Findings

The results indicate that utilitarian and hedonic values, trust and subjective norms positively affect consumer purchase intention. They also reveal the moderating effect of availability on the relationship between consumers' purchasing intention and their actual behaviour in the Saudi Arabian context.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes to knowledge about the relationships among perceived values, trust, subjective norms, availability and consumer purchasing intentions of organic food, and their actual behaviour in an emerging market. The results enlarge the understanding of consumers' purchasing behaviour in the Saudi Arabian organic food market and point out some opportunities for future research.

Originality/value

The study is original in investigating the factors that influence customers' intention and their actual purchasing behaviour toward organic food in Saudi Arabia. It is a first attempt to test the moderating influence of availability on the relationship between purchase intention and actual purchasing behaviour toward organic food products in an emerging market.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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