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Article
Publication date: 11 February 2019

Mohamed Abdelhamid, Victoria Kisekka and Spyridon Samonas

The purpose of this study is to understand why individuals choose to avoid using e-services due to security concerns and perceived risk when these factors are affected by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to understand why individuals choose to avoid using e-services due to security concerns and perceived risk when these factors are affected by the perceived degree of government cybersecurity preparedness against cyberattacks.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopt the information systems success model to predict the role of government security preparedness efforts in influencing the determinants of e-services avoidance. The conceptual model includes four variables: security concerns, perceived risk of cyberattacks, perceived government cybersecurity preparedness and e-services avoidance. Data from 774 participants were used to analyze our conceptual model.

Findings

First, the findings show that security concerns regarding personal information safety and perceived risk of cyberattacks are barriers to e-services use, with the former having a stronger effect. Second, the findings showed that perceived government cybersecurity preparedness significantly reduces security concerns and perceived risk of cyberattacks. Third, the post hoc group analysis between individuals with a bachelor’s degree or higher versus those without a bachelor’s degree showed that the effect of both security concerns and perceived risk of cyberattacks on e-services avoidance was greater for individuals without a bachelor’s degree. The same relationship between perceived risk of cyberattacks and e-services avoidance was not supported for individuals with a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Originality/value

Extant privacy research fails to adequately examine the role of institutional factors, such as government efforts, and how these mitigate or amplify cybersecurity concerns and risks related to e-services. This research takes the first step toward addressing this limitation by examining the influence of government cybersecurity preparedness efforts on the determinants of e-services avoidance.

Details

Information & Computer Security, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4961

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Mohamed Abdelhamid and Aleksander Czekanski

This is an attempt to better bridge the gap between the mathematical and the engineering/physical aspects of the topic. The authors trace the different sources of…

Abstract

Purpose

This is an attempt to better bridge the gap between the mathematical and the engineering/physical aspects of the topic. The authors trace the different sources of non-convexification in the context of topology optimization problems starting from domain discretization, passing through penalization for discreteness and effects of filtering methods, and end with a note on continuation methods.

Design/methodology/approach

Starting from the global optimum of the compliance minimization problem, the authors employ analytical tools to investigate how intermediate density penalization affects the convexity of the problem, the potential penalization-like effects of various filtering techniques, how continuation methods can be used to approach the global optimum and how the initial guess has some weight in determining the final optimum.

Findings

The non-convexification effects of the penalization of intermediate density elements simply overshadows any other type of non-convexification introduced into the problem, mainly due to its severity and locality. Continuation methods are strongly recommended to overcome the problem of local minima, albeit its step and convergence criteria are left to the user depending on the type of application.

Originality/value

In this article, the authors present a comprehensive treatment of the sources of non-convexity in density-based topology optimization problems, with a focus on linear elastic compliance minimization. The authors put special emphasis on the potential penalization-like effects of various filtering techniques through a detailed mathematical treatment.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Walid Mansour, Mohamed Ben Abdelhamid, Omar Masood and G.S.K. Niazi

Islamic banking is an increasingly important factor in the UK financial environment. With Islamic banks entering the industry in significant numbers – and competing…

Abstract

Purpose

Islamic banking is an increasingly important factor in the UK financial environment. With Islamic banks entering the industry in significant numbers – and competing directly with the incumbent “conventional” ones – the question of selection criteria of the banks' customers is of obvious interest. The purpose of this paper is to study the decision‐making process of a sample of UK customers and the factors that may influence them.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a sample of 156 UK questionnaire respondents, comprising Muslim and non‐Muslim bank customers alike. The methodological approach is partly borrowed from Masood et al. with the chosen questions aimed at finding out what drives the selection process of bank customers.

Findings

The paper's major findings show that, irrespective of the demographic features and the religion of the respondents, the criterion “low services charges” is the top customers' criteria. The Islamic nature of the bank is, however, placed second, pointing to the importance of religious orientation.

Research limitations/implications

The major limitation of the paper relates to the size of the sample of respondents. The findings of the paper are likely to be of interest to UK banks determining how best to attract customers in the new era. Future research may usefully focus on an international comparison of bank selection criteria by employing an index of religiosity.

Originality/value

The paper is of particular value because it focuses on the choice of banking in the context of the recent significant growth in the Islamic banking industry in the UK.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

Content available
Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Bruce Burton

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Youmna Mohamed Abdelghany Youssef, Wesley J. Johnston, Talaat Asaad AbdelHamid, Mona Ibrahim Dakrory and Mohamed Galal Soliman Seddick

The purpose of this study is to investigate conceptually the relationship between the customer’s engagement and equity and to determine whether customer engagement could…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate conceptually the relationship between the customer’s engagement and equity and to determine whether customer engagement could be positively enhanced by business-to-business (B2B) firms to maximize their customer equity, through examining the role of cognitive, emotional and behavioral engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is built on the evolving marketing literature and proposes a comprehensive framework that uses a multidimensional conceptualization for the customer’s engagement and equity constructs; examines the relationships between customer satisfaction, commitment, trust and involvement and customer engagement; and specifies the specific customer engagement dimensions – cognitive, emotional and behavioral – as key mediators of the engagement–equity relationship.

Findings

This paper indicated that customer engagement is a multidimensional construct with three dimensions: cognitive, emotional or behavior engagement. Customer’s satisfaction, commitment, trust and involvement would be regarded as antecedents to customer engagement, whereas customer equity would be regarded a consequence for customer engagement. In addition, this paper identified three drivers of customer equity – value, brand and relationship equities – based on reviewing the previous studies.

Originality/value

This paper integrates philosophies from previous marketing studies of customer relationship management and customer engagement and equity into a B2B environment in a more customer-centric approach.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2021

Amine Zaidi, Ouarda Izemmouren, Bachir Taallah and Abdelhamid Guettala

Earthen construction does not meet today’s requirements due to certain limitations such as low water resistance and its high vulnerability to cracking damage. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

Earthen construction does not meet today’s requirements due to certain limitations such as low water resistance and its high vulnerability to cracking damage. The purpose of this study is to improve the mechanical properties and low durability of adobe blocks by incorporating date palm wastes as a natural reinforcement and lime as a stabilizer.

Design/methodology/approach

Soil from the region of Biskra in Algeria was mixed with sand and lime in suitable ratios. Then, date palm wastes were added to the previous mixture at different ratios (0.3%, 0.6% and 0.9%) by dry mix weight to manufacture adobes. Cubical and cylindrical specimens were prepared and tested in a laboratory to investigate the curing time, mechanical and durability characteristics of the formulated blocks. In addition, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) tests were used to identify the materials.

Findings

It has been observed that the addition of lime to the soil is very beneficial for its stabilization, in particular for an optimum of 12%. The presence of date palm waste in the mixture (soil + lime) generated a significant improvement in tensile strength reaching a rate of about 67%. The same observation was made for the tests of resistance to dry abrasion, resistance to erosion, attack by external sulphate and wetting/drying. However, for cases of compressive strength, water absorption and swelling an unfavorable effect was recorded.

Originality/value

Based on the above-mentioned findings, this paper presents a novel solution to increase the durability of adobe materials using date palm wastes with oven curing at 65°C for about nine days. Adopting such an approach would certainly encourage building durable mud housing on a large scale. This can contribute to solving the acute housing shortage, particularly in poor countries.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2019

Adnan Enshassi, Nour Saleh and Sherif Mohamed

This paper aims to investigate the application of lean construction (LC) techniques in reducing accidents in construction projects.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the application of lean construction (LC) techniques in reducing accidents in construction projects.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative approach was used to collect the required data using a questionnaire survey and descriptive analysis was used to analyse the collected data. The LC techniques that were investigated in this paper are related to the tools of the last planner system (LPS), increased visualisation (IV), 5S, error-proofing, daily huddle meetings (DHMs), first-run studies (FRS), continuous improvement (Kaizen) and accident investigation (5Whys).

Findings

The overall results indicated that LC techniques are poorly implemented in construction projects in the Gaza Strip. The top three LC tools used to reduce the causes of accidents in the Gaza construction projects were 5Whys, 5S and LPS, while the highest three LC techniques applied to reduce the causes of accidents that were applicable were cleaning the workplace and removing materials and machines that are not required; conducting accident investigation and root cause analysis programmes; and using safety signs and labels on site.

Research limitations/implications

There is a lack of information and published studies regarding the links between LC and safety, especially in the Middle East. This paper is limited to the perceptions and geographical boundaries; therefore, it cannot be generalised. However, it could form the basis for useful comparison in the future. Triangulation research method could also be used in future research to minimise the bias and validate the conclusions.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper will stress professionals and construction companies in Gaza to reconsider their behaviour towards using LC techniques. The findings of this paper will aid them to shift their attention and resources towards including LC techniques in their plans to reduce the causes of accidents on construction sites.

Social implications

The findings of this paper will encourage professionals and construction companies in Gaza to reconsider their behaviour towards using LC techniques. The findings will also aid them to shift their attention and resources towards including LC techniques in their plans to reduce and/or avoid the causes of accidents on construction.

Originality/value

Because of the lack of published works that are specific to the Middle East, the authors believe that the originality lies in the paper’s serious attempt to explore the application level of the LC concept to safety in this part of the world. This paper contributes to a better understanding of the applicability of LC techniques in terms of accidents reduction. Findings from this paper provide a clear picture of the current status of using LC techniques to reduce accidents in the Gazan construction projects which drive them to investigate the main barriers and try to overcome them.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction , vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2010

Anurag Shankar Kshirsagar, Mohamed A. El‐Gafy and Tariq Sami Abdelhamid

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the accuracy of life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) for institutional (higher education) buildings as a predictor of actual realised…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the accuracy of life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) for institutional (higher education) buildings as a predictor of actual realised facility costs.

Design/methodology/approach

Research methodology includes a comprehensive literature review to identify issues, best practices and implementation of LCCA in the construction industry. A case study was conducted to evaluate the accuracy of LCCA in predicting facility costs.

Findings

Notwithstanding the benefits of LCCA, its adoption has been relatively slow for institutional buildings. The case study revealed that the average difference between estimated and actual construction cost is 37 per cent, whereas the average difference between the actual and estimated maintenance cost is 48 per cent. There is an average difference of 85 per cent in the actual and estimated administration cost.

Research limitations/implications

While limited to a few buildings, the case study underscores that LCCA methods should not be used for cost predictions of facility performance but rather for comparing total costs of alternative building features and systems, as well as building types. Sensitivity analysis also revealed that the selection of a discount rate would have less impact on recurring costs estimates compared to non‐recurring cost estimates. Facilities managers' involvement in LCCA technique developments and implementations will likely improve its performance during programming phases.

Practical implications

The value of LCCA procedures is limited as a predictor of actual realised facility costs. Educational institutions can use the methods described in this paper to replicate the study and arrive at their own conclusions regarding the LCCA techniques and their potential use in programming stages.

Originality/value

The paper evaluated the accuracy of LCCA for institutional buildings and the potential of LCCA as an asset management tool for institutional buildings and provided suggestions to improve its adoption in facilities management.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Eddie W.L. Cheng, H. Li, D.P. Fang and F. Xie

This paper aims at presenting the analysis of the views of construction participants in China’s construction industry on three major site safety issues. First, data from…

Abstract

This paper aims at presenting the analysis of the views of construction participants in China’s construction industry on three major site safety issues. First, data from three distinctive roles (project managers, safety officers, and foremen) on site safety knowledge were analysed. Results indicate that they have low levels of safety knowledge. This is consistent with the existing literature, implying that safety training and education is a major issue around the world. In addition, the views of project managers and safety officers are further elicited on the second issue (that is, factors affecting site safety) and the third issue (that is, methods for improving project safety management). Results indicate that both parties have quite consistent views. The six most important factors are “lack of attention to safety protection by workers”, “lack of attention to safety management by main contractors/project managers”, “insufficient safety training”, “inadequate safety level”, “tiredness of workers”, and “poor quality of construction materials and equipments”. The five most promising methods are “increase in safety investment in terms of manpower, capital and finance”, “improvement in safety operations”, “no alcohol at work”, “increase in safety training and education for workers”, and “increase in safety inspection”. Discussions are given in this paper.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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