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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Michael Nwogugu

The purposes of this article are to evaluate models of stock market risk developed by Robert Engle, and related models (ARCH, GARCH, VAR, etc.); to establish whether…

2208

Abstract

Purpose

The purposes of this article are to evaluate models of stock market risk developed by Robert Engle, and related models (ARCH, GARCH, VAR, etc.); to establish whether prospect theory, cumulative prospect theory, expected utility theory, and market‐risk models (ARCH, GARCH, VAR, etc.) are related and have the same foundations.

Design/methodology/approach

The author critiques existing academic work on risk, decision making, prospect theory, cumulative prospect theory, expected utility theory, VAR and other market‐risk models (ARCH, GARCH, etc.) and analyzes the shortcomings of various measures of risk (standard deviation, VAR, etc.).

Findings

Prospect theory, cumulative prospect theory, expected utility theory, and market‐risk models are conceptually the same and do not account for many facets of risk and decision making. Risk and decision making are better quantified and modeled using a mix of situation‐specific dynamic, quantitative, and qualitative factors. Belief systems (a new model developed by the author) can better account for the multi‐dimensional characteristics of risk and decision making. The market‐risk models developed by Engle and related models (ARCH, GARCH, VAR, etc.) are inaccurate, do not incorporate many factors inherent in stock markets and asset prices, and thus are not useful and accurate in many asset markets.

Research limitations/implications

Areas for further research include: development of dynamic market‐risk models that incorporate asset‐market psychology, liquidity, market size, frequency of trading, knowledge differences among market participants, and trading rules in each market; and further development of concepts in belief systems.

Practical implications

Decision making and risk assessment are multi‐criteria processes that typically require some processing of information, and thus cannot be defined accurately by rigid quantitative models. Existing market‐risk models are inaccurate – many international banks, central banks, government agencies, and financial institutions use these models for risk management, capital allocation, portfolio management, and investments, and thus the international financial system may be compromised.

Originality/value

The critiques, ideas, and new theories in the article were all developed by the author. The issues discussed in the article are relevant to a multiplicity of situations and people in any case that requires decision making and risk assessment.

Details

The Journal of Risk Finance, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1526-5943

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 30 November 2002

Jae Ha Lee and Han Deog Hui

This study explores hedging strategies that use the KTB futures to hedge the price risk of the KTB spot portfolio. The study establishes the price sensitivity, risk

25

Abstract

This study explores hedging strategies that use the KTB futures to hedge the price risk of the KTB spot portfolio. The study establishes the price sensitivity, risk-minimization, bivariate GARCH (1,1) models as hedging models, and analyzes their hedging performances. The sample period covers from September 29, 1999 to September 18, 2001. Time-matched prices at 11:00 (11:30) of the KTB futures and spot were used in the analysis. The most important findings may be summarized as follows. First, while the average hedge ration of the price sensitivity model is close to one, both the risk-minimization and GARCH model exhibit hedge ratios that are substantially lower than one. Hedge ratios tend to be greater for daily data than for weekly data. Second, for the daily in-sample data, hedging effectiveness is the highest for the GARCH model with time-varying hedge ratios, but the risk-minimization model with constant hedge ratios is not far behind the GARCH model in its hedging performance. In the case of out-of-sample hedging effectiveness, the GARCH model is the best for the KTB spot portfolio, and the risk-minimization model is the best for the corporate bond portfolio. Third, for daily data, the in-sample hedge shows a better performance than the out-of-sample hedge, except for the risk-minimization hedge against the corporate bond portfolio. Fourth, for the weekly in-sample hedges, the price sensitivity model is the worst and the risk-minimization model is the best in hedging the KTB spot portfolio. While the GARCH model is the best against the KTB +corporate bond portfolio, the risk-minimization model is generally as good as the GARCH model. The risk-minimization model performs the best for the weekly out-of-sample data, and the out-of-sample hedges are better than the in-sample hedges. Fifth, while the hedging performance of the risk-minimization model with daily moving window seems somewhat superior to the traditional risk-minimization model when the trading volume increased one year after the inception of the KTB futures, on the average the traditional model is better than the moving-window model. For weekly data, the traditional model exhibits a better performance. Overall, in the Korean bond markets, investors are encouraged to use the simple risk-minimization model to hedge the price risk of the KTB spot and corporate bond portfolios.

Details

Journal of Derivatives and Quantitative Studies, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2713-6647

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 August 2022

Kai Li and Chenjie Xu

This paper aims to study the asset pricing implications for stock and bond markets in a long-run risks (LRR) model with regime shifts. This general equilibrium framework…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the asset pricing implications for stock and bond markets in a long-run risks (LRR) model with regime shifts. This general equilibrium framework can not only generate sign-switching stock-bond correlations and bond risk premium, but also quantitatively reproduce various other salient empirical features in stock and bond markets, including time-varying equity and bond return premia, regime shifts in real and nominal yield curves, the violation of the expectations hypothesis of bond returns.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers study the joint determinants of stock and bond returns in a LRR model framework with regime shifts in consumption and inflation dynamics. In particular, the means, volatilities, and the correlation structure between consumption growth and inflation are regime-dependent.

Findings

The model shows that the term structure of interest rates and stock-bond correlation are intimately related to business cycles, while LRR play a more important role in accounting for high equity premium than do business cycle risks.

Originality/value

This paper studies the joint determinants of stock and bond returns in a Bansal and Yaron (2004) type of LRR framework. This rational expectations general equilibrium framework can (1) jointly match the dynamics of consumption, inflation and cash flow; (2) generate time-varying and sign-switching stock and bond correlations, as well as generating sign-switching bond risk premium; and (3) coherently explain another long list of salient empirical features in stock and bond markets, including time-varying equity and bond return premia, regime shifts in real and nominal yield curves, the violation of the expectations hypothesis of bond returns.

Details

China Finance Review International, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1398

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 26 April 2017

Prince Boateng, Zhen Chen and Stephen O. Ogunlana

Abstract

Details

Megaproject Risk Analysis and Simulation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-830-1

Book part
Publication date: 1 May 2012

John B. Guerard

Stock selection models often use momentum and analysts’ expectation data. We find that earnings forecast revisions and direction of forecast revisions are more important…

Abstract

Stock selection models often use momentum and analysts’ expectation data. We find that earnings forecast revisions and direction of forecast revisions are more important than analysts’ forecasts in identifying mispriced securities. Investing with expectations data and momentum variables is consistent with maximizing the geometric mean and Sharpe ratio over the long run. Additional evidence is revealed that supports the use of multifactor models for portfolio construction and risk control. The anomalies literature can be applied in real-world portfolio construction in the U.S., international, and global equity markets during the 1998–2009 time period. Support exists for the use of tracking error at risk estimation procedures.

While perfection cannot be achieved in portfolio creation and modeling, the estimated model returns pass the Markowitz and Xu data mining corrections test and are statistically different from an average financial model that could have been used to select stocks and form portfolios. We found additional evidence to support the use of Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT) and statistically-based and fundamentally-based multifactor models for portfolio construction and risk control. Markets are neither efficient nor grossly inefficient; statistically significant excess returns can be earned.

Details

Research in Finance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-752-9

Book part
Publication date: 28 October 2019

Angelo Corelli

Abstract

Details

Understanding Financial Risk Management, Second Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-794-3

Abstract

Details

Megaproject Risk Analysis and Simulation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-830-1

Abstract

Details

Tools and Techniques for Financial Stability Analysis
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-846-4

Book part
Publication date: 29 December 2016

Mazin A. M. Al Janabi

Given the rising need for measuring and controlling of financial risk as proposed in Basel II and Basel III Capital Adequacy Accords, trading risk assessment under…

Abstract

Given the rising need for measuring and controlling of financial risk as proposed in Basel II and Basel III Capital Adequacy Accords, trading risk assessment under illiquid market conditions plays an increasing role in banking and financial sectors, particularly in emerging financial markets. The purpose of this chapter is to investigate asset liquidity risk and to obtain a Liquidity-Adjusted Value at Risk (L-VaR) estimation for various equity portfolios. The assessment of L-VaR is performed by implementing three different asset liquidity models within a multivariate context along with GARCH-M method (to estimate expected returns and conditional volatility) and by applying meaningful financial and operational constraints. Using more than six years of daily return dataset of emerging Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) stock markets, we find that under certain trading strategies, such as short selling of stocks, the sensitivity of L-VaR statistics are rather critical to the selected internal liquidity model in addition to the degree of correlation factors among trading assets. As such, the effects of extreme correlations (plus or minus unity) are crucial aspects to consider in selecting the most adequate internal liquidity model for economic capital allocation, especially under crisis condition and/or when correlations tend to switch sings. This chapter bridges the gap in risk management literatures by providing real-world asset allocation tactics that can be used for trading portfolios under adverse markets’ conditions. The approach to computing L-VaR has been arrived at through the application of three distinct liquidity models and the obtained results are used to draw conclusions about the relative liquidity of the diverse equity portfolios.

Book part
Publication date: 9 September 2020

Ying L. Becker, Lin Guo and Odilbek Nurmamatov

Value at risk (VaR) and expected shortfall (ES) are popular market risk measurements. The former is not coherent but robust, whereas the latter is coherent but less…

Abstract

Value at risk (VaR) and expected shortfall (ES) are popular market risk measurements. The former is not coherent but robust, whereas the latter is coherent but less interpretable, only conditionally backtestable and less robust. In this chapter, we compare an innovative artificial neural network (ANN) model with a time series model in the context of forecasting VaR and ES of the univariate time series of four asset classes: US large capitalization equity index, European large cap equity index, US bond index, and US dollar versus euro exchange rate price index for the period of January 4, 1999, to December 31, 2018. In general, the ANN model has more favorable backtesting results as compared to the autoregressive moving average, generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (ARMA-GARCH) time series model. In terms of forecasting accuracy, the ANN model has much fewer in-sample and out-of-sample exceptions than those of the ARMA-GARCH model.

Details

Advances in Pacific Basin Business, Economics and Finance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-363-5

Keywords

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