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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1983

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This…

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Abstract

In the last four years, since Volume I of this Bibliography first appeared, there has been an explosion of literature in all the main functional areas of business. This wealth of material poses problems for the researcher in management studies — and, of course, for the librarian: uncovering what has been written in any one area is not an easy task. This volume aims to help the librarian and the researcher overcome some of the immediate problems of identification of material. It is an annotated bibliography of management, drawing on the wide variety of literature produced by MCB University Press. Over the last four years, MCB University Press has produced an extensive range of books and serial publications covering most of the established and many of the developing areas of management. This volume, in conjunction with Volume I, provides a guide to all the material published so far.

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Management Decision, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Jonathan C. Morris

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within…

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Abstract

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within and shows that these are in many, differing, areas across management research from: retail finance; precarious jobs and decisions; methodological lessons from feminism; call centre experience and disability discrimination. These and all points east and west are covered and laid out in a simple, abstract style, including, where applicable, references, endnotes and bibliography in an easy‐to‐follow manner. Summarizes each paper and also gives conclusions where needed, in a comfortable modern format.

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Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Book part
Publication date: 10 July 2014

Chinthaka Balasooriya, Augustine Asante, Ranmalie Jayasinha and Husna Razee

The internationalisation of academia has significantly altered the higher education environment. Interactions between academic staff and students from a range of social…

Abstract

The internationalisation of academia has significantly altered the higher education environment. Interactions between academic staff and students from a range of social, political and cultural backgrounds are now commonplace. Within this context, it is important to explore the professional and personal impact of internationalisation on academics and academic environments. This chapter synthesises the global literature on academic mobility and migration through the lens of personal reflections by three international academics at an Australian-based university. The reflections focus on the complexities of transitioning to a new academic environment, the unique challenges often encountered by international academics, and how these impact on their teaching and research experiences as well as on their professional identity. The nature of the adjustments and changes in lifestyle that academics make when transitioning to an overseas academic environment are explored, with reference to implications for future developments in academic mobility.

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Academic Mobility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-853-2

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Jason Ryan, Sari Silvanto and Haakon T. Brown

The purpose of this paper is to examine empirically whether teaching methodologies that emphasize international experiential learning have a significant role in fostering…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine empirically whether teaching methodologies that emphasize international experiential learning have a significant role in fostering or encouraging greater international mobility. To that end, it assesses whether MBA programs that emphasize experience‐based learning in the form of international travel, exchanges and internships have more internationally mobile graduates than programs that do not. It also discusses the broader role of experiential learning in teaching students skills relevant to international business.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses data from the Financial Times Global MBA Rankings and the A.T. Kearney/Foreign Policy Globalization Index to assess whether international experiential learning is conducive to the future international mobility of graduates. It employs a multivariate data analysis methodology to examine whether the international experience and exposure received during an MBA is a predictor of subsequent international mobility.

Findings

This study finds that MBA programs that use experiential teaching methods that emphasize international travel, exchanges and internships tend to have more internationally mobile graduates than those that do not, even after the influence of foreign students and location have been controlled for.

Originality/value

Relatively few studies have examined the question of whether the international experiential teaching methods that many MBA programs use, such as exchanges, internships and travel, have an impact on the subsequent international mobility of graduates. This is an important research area as many MBA programs have embraced experiential learning techniques as the centerpiece of their efforts to train more culturally sensitive, adaptable and internationally‐minded graduates to work both domestically and overseas.

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Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Book part
Publication date: 2 August 2021

Veronika Rozhenkova

Over the last few decades, internationalization has become one of the major aspects of many universities’ development agenda. Such internationalization initiatives as…

Abstract

Over the last few decades, internationalization has become one of the major aspects of many universities’ development agenda. Such internationalization initiatives as study abroad and dual degree programs create greater academic mobility; however, they frequently present a risk of potential brain drain. Brain drain is commonly defined as the emigration of well-educated and skilled individuals from their home to another country, with less developed countries suffering from this phenomenon to a greater extent. Higher education institutions and national governments across the world have been trying to retain these individuals through improving the system of higher education, and increasing job advancement and research opportunities. This chapter examines the phenomenon of brain drain as well as its current trends and implications in the higher education sector. It pays particular attention to the case of Russia with its increased emigration of highly educated and skilled professionals over the last two decades, while also drawing on examples from other countries’ policies and practices. The chapter explores different programs and initiatives introduced on institutional and governmental levels to address the issue of brain drain in the context of internationalization of higher education.

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Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2020
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-907-1

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Farveh Farivar, Jane Coffey and Roslyn Cameron

The purpose of this paper is to investigate which sociocultural and work conditions have the potential to change international graduates’ career mobility intentions and

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate which sociocultural and work conditions have the potential to change international graduates’ career mobility intentions and encourage international graduates to stay in the host country when the initial intention was to leave the host country after graduating.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected via a web-based survey from international graduates and analyses suggest 129 (20 percent) of respondents changed their initial career mobility intentions. Data were analyzed using fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis.

Findings

Although previous studies report some pull–push factors such as attractive payment rates and work experience as being important in attracting potential workforce participants, these factors have no influence on changing the career mobility intentions of international graduates. In contrast, the work environment (WE) seems to be a strong condition for changing career mobility decisions. Results also reveal that the influence of sociocultural conditions on initial career mobility intention is more complicated than work conditions and varies from case to case.

Practical implications

The present study adopts the theoretical assumption that migration and mobility is a transition that forms over time and the findings suggest that international graduates’ global career mobility intentions depend on the WE. Therefore, government, higher education and industry development policy makers need to take this factor into account if they are interested in attracting and retaining global talent.

Originality/value

The majority of previous studies have focused on which push–pull factors encourage the recently graduated international student workforce to move or stay in a country while the current study argues which conditions have the potential to change initial career mobility intentions.

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Sari Silvanto, Jason Ryan and Vipin Gupta

This paper aims to develop a clearer understanding of the role of business education and business schools in fostering global mobility. As business schools seek to educate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a clearer understanding of the role of business education and business schools in fostering global mobility. As business schools seek to educate managers who can work globally and adjust to new business and cultural environments, it is important to assess which specific dimensions of business education, such as the location of the school and its curriculum, play a significant role in fostering greater global mobility among business graduates. This also helps how business schools potentially influence global talent flows.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses an empirical research methodology in the form of a multivariate analysis to examine a sample of 91 business schools that are accredited by Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) in the 2015 Financial Times Global MBA Ranking.

Findings

This study finds that international mobility of MBA graduates is mediated both by the design of the curriculum and the location of the business school. MBA graduates from leading business schools that offer greater levels of international experiential learning are more likely to pursue overseas careers after graduation. MBA graduates from leading business schools that are located in economically globalized locations, by contrast, are often more likely to remain in the country where they studied after graduation to pursue local employment opportunities.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the knowledge of how business education influences the international mobility of business graduates and how it influences global talent flows.

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Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 10 no. 01
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

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Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1985

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III…

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Abstract

The librarian and researcher have to be able to uncover specific articles in their areas of interest. This Bibliography is designed to help. Volume IV, like Volume III, contains features to help the reader to retrieve relevant literature from MCB University Press' considerable output. Each entry within has been indexed according to author(s) and the Fifth Edition of the SCIMP/SCAMP Thesaurus. The latter thus provides a full subject index to facilitate rapid retrieval. Each article or book is assigned its own unique number and this is used in both the subject and author index. This Volume indexes 29 journals indicating the depth, coverage and expansion of MCB's portfolio.

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Management Decision, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Sari Silvanto and Jason Ryan

The global migration and movement of talent plays an important role in the economic growth and competitiveness of many nations. In coming decades, it is anticipated that…

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1753

Abstract

Purpose

The global migration and movement of talent plays an important role in the economic growth and competitiveness of many nations. In coming decades, it is anticipated that there will be increased competition between countries to attract the best and brightest. The World Economic Forum (2011) has recommended using nation branding strategies to attract talent. In response to this recommendation, the purpose of this paper is to propose a strategic framework and terminology for branding nations to attract highly skilled workers. Based on a review of the literature, it recommends five strategic vision drivers that can help countries brand themselves in an appealing and compelling way to talented professionals. This paper also recommends the term “relocation branding” to describe the practice of branding nations, regions and cities to attract talent.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the literature on nation branding and talent mobility to propose a conceptual framework of five vision drivers for branding destinations to attract talent. It also discusses how these vision drivers can be used in the context of an overall branding initiative and campaign.

Findings

This paper finds that the determinants of talent mobility are complex and overlapping. Highly skilled temporary and permanent migrants have a broad range of concerns and interests when they voluntarily choose a country to live and work in. This paper argues that, given these complexities, a more tailored and multidimensional understanding of talent mobility is necessary to effectively craft a branding strategy that will appeal to the highly skilled. A clear vision, demonstrating an understanding of the challenges of moving between countries, has to be integrated into the brand from the outset.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the only in-depth studies of nation branding for the purpose of attracting temporary and permanent skilled migrants. The value of this paper is significant as it provides a framework for strategically creating and positioning nation brands to attract highly skilled workers.

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