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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Liyi Zhang and Wei Ma

This paper aims to investigate the use of mobile reading among Chinese college students and to provide a statistical analysis of correlation between the users' educational…

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2459

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the use of mobile reading among Chinese college students and to provide a statistical analysis of correlation between the users' educational level and their mobile reading behavior. The result can be used as a reference for the differentiated marketing of the mobile reading service provider.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on an online questionnaire oriented to Chinese college students, including undergraduate and graduate students. The questionnaire includes questions related to the profiles and mobile reading behaviors of the respondents. The survey lasted from 15 April to 15 June 2010 and 479 responses were received.

Findings

Mobile reading is in its early stages of development and has huge market potential in China. The pay‐reading service only makes up a small, slowly growing share. Well educated users are more inclined to pay for academic papers while other users prefer online literature. In general, mobile reading services have yet to become more and more popular by improving user segmentation, expanding the scope of service and conducting precise price marketing in China.

Practical implications

This study can help mobile reading service providers to gather information on user behavior and launch better mobile reading services.

Originality/value

The paper is one of the first to investigate the market of mobile reading in China. The paper provides suggestions for further improvement of the mobile reading service and help service providers better understand users' demands. Also it may provide some useful information for further research in mobile reading.

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Min Zhang, Mingxing Zhu, Xiaotong Liu and Jun Yang

Because mobile phones offer a new, affordable and easy-to-use portal to reading material, mobile reading is emerging as the most ultra-modern reading approach. From the…

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1391

Abstract

Purpose

Because mobile phones offer a new, affordable and easy-to-use portal to reading material, mobile reading is emerging as the most ultra-modern reading approach. From the perspective of mobile reading service providers, knowledge of customer purchase, and consumption behaviour is critical for their survival and success. This paper aims to provide insights into the factors that influence the purchase e-books.

Design/methodology/approach

Following means-end chain theory, the prospect theory and elaboration likelihood model, a structural equation model is proposed to investigate and identify key factors that drive the purchase intention of experienced mobile readers. In the theoretical model, utilitarian value (UV) and hedonic value (HV) are supposed as formative second-order constructs formed by related payoff.

Findings

Both UV and HV are positively associated with readers’ purchase intention. However, there are no big differences between these two path coefficients. People seem to perceive relatively low payment risk although perceived risk could still negatively affect purchase intention. As a predictor of purchase intention, UV is less important when risk perception increases or when involvement (IV) decreases. Furthermore, this study illustrates that uniqueness and convenience (CV) are significant components of UV, whereas curiosity and flow are components of HV.

Practical implications

Mobile reading providers should highlight the professional and specificity of app such as beautiful cover, page setup that similar to real books and so on. Readers should be allowed to post real-time reviews and communicate with others to improve their sense of satisfaction, participation and belonging. The payment process should be concise and simple through which readers can save their purchase time and effort. Mobile reading service providers should provide trustworthy payment approaches, especially third-party platform and guarantee the CV and safety of payment activity.

Originality value

By focusing on the impacts of relationships among UV, HV, perceived risk and IV to purchase intention, this paper not only provides a theoretical understanding of mobile reading purchase behaviour but also offers practical insights to reading material manufactures and app developers for promoting such a process.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2021

Hoi Yin Yu, Yan Yung Tsoi, Anthony Hae Ryong Rhim, Dickson K.W. Chiu and Mavis Man-Wai Lung

A rising trend has been observed to minimize extraneous cognitive load when reading by enhancing secondary knowledge through technology. For the readers to comprehend…

Abstract

Purpose

A rising trend has been observed to minimize extraneous cognitive load when reading by enhancing secondary knowledge through technology. For the readers to comprehend information more efficiently in their cognitive architecture, instructional procedures, which are secondary knowledge, should be aligned with the modern technology environment. With continual, rapid technological advances in modern society, people have changed their news reading habits after using mobile devices such as smartphones, tablets and e-readers.

Design/methodology/approach

This research employed a quantitative survey to compare the changes in the news reading habits of the undergraduate (UG) and postgraduate (PG) students in the Library and Information Management program of a university in Hong Kong after using mobile devices to read electronic news. A total of 102 responses were collected, which comprised 51 UGs and 51 PGs, respectively (the student population for the program was around 100 UGs and 100 PGs).

Findings

Survey results showed that mobile devices had changed the respondents’ habit of reading news to read more content on phones, with a variation on news categories. Such changes included the duration and location of news discussion among the respondents that shorter periods were used to read and that more people read while traveling and in restaurants. Notably, reading the news helped respondents in their learning. Most respondents preferred to read electronic news by using mobile devices. The convenience of reading and discussing news may also cause a potential threat that intensifies disputes, arguments or even bullying on controversial issues.

Originality/value

This study confirmed that the usage of the mobile devices changed the respondents’ habit of reading news. This user group constitutes the future generation of information specialists in various disciplines. This study fills the research gap of finding students’ reading habits when using mobile devices, especially in East Asia. Educators are encouraged to recommend relevant news content to students to improve their general knowledge base and arouse their interest in reading and discussing related news topics.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Book part
Publication date: 21 November 2018

Grace Oakley and Umera Imtinan

In this chapter, we discuss initiatives that aim to improve children’s literacy in low- and middle-income (LMI) countries through m-learning. These projects, predominantly…

Abstract

In this chapter, we discuss initiatives that aim to improve children’s literacy in low- and middle-income (LMI) countries through m-learning. These projects, predominantly introduced by governments and international aid organisations, often involve the provision of e-books and apps including game-based apps, to be used either inside or outside school. In some cases, lesson plans and content for teachers in poorly resourced schools are also delivered via mobile devices. After a general overview, we briefly describe a selection of projects with reference to m-learning and literacy theory and research. It is indicated in this chapter that the use of mobile devices to improve literacy opportunities for children in LMI countries has a great deal of potential but that, in many cases, there are limitations in pedagogical design and implementation practices, not to mention restricted views of what literacy is and might be for children in these locations.

Details

Mobile Technologies in Children’s Language and Literacy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-879-6

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Book part
Publication date: 22 May 2013

Barbara McClanahan and Anne Stojke

Purpose – Describes the various ways mobile devices are becoming part of the 21st century classroom and how best practices of reading instruction are applied to the use of…

Abstract

Purpose – Describes the various ways mobile devices are becoming part of the 21st century classroom and how best practices of reading instruction are applied to the use of these devices to support struggling readers.Design/methodology/approach – Situates mobile devices within the framework of other information and communication technologies (ICTs), especially as related to struggling readers. Following that discussion, uses of various mobile devices are addressed based on the learning/reading task rather than a specific device.Findings – Uses of mobile devices in the classroom often build on or simply “digitize” traditional reading/learning strategies. Other implementations of the devices can take students beyond such basic approaches to engage them in multimedia and New Literacies to create their own texts and multimedia projects that enhance reading skills rather than just consume them.Research limitations/implications – The field of mobile devices in the classroom is quite new and extremely fluid. It is certain that there are other great applications and strategies being implemented in schools all over the world. More research to gain further understandings is needed.Practical implications – While obviously not exhaustive, this chapter offers instructors and researchers an opportunity to become aware of the issues related to mobile devices in the classroom and to launch their own exploration of this field.Originality/value of paper – It is hoped that instructors and researchers will be inspired to try out some of the strategies and/or devices discussed and find even more inventive ways to positively impact learning for their students.

Details

School-Based Interventions for Struggling Readers, K-8
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-696-5

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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Shang Gao, John Krogstie, Trond Thingstad and Hoang Tran

The purpose of this paper is to develop a mobile service, based on anonymous location-based data, to help students find available reading rooms on a university campus. To…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a mobile service, based on anonymous location-based data, to help students find available reading rooms on a university campus. To evaluate this mobile service, both a usability test and a technology acceptance test were carried out.

Design/methodology/approach

The research followed a design science approach, including developing a prototype and evaluating the developed prototype.

Findings

The results from the usability test indicated good usability of the developed mobile service. The results from the technology acceptance test demonstrated students’ intention to use this mobile service. Most respondents indicated that they would like to use this mobile service to find available reading rooms when they are on campus.

Research limitations/implications

The results imply that there are other contexts where anonymous location-based data are also useful. A similar mobile service can be developed for other contexts, such as, hospital complexes, shopping malls, and airports.

Originality/value

To the authors best knowledge, the authors have not found any mobile services aiming at counting the density of people residing in a room by using anonymous user location-based data on a university campus. This research fills this gap by developing the mobile service, called finding reading rooms.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2020

Chin-Feng Lai, Hua-Xu Zhong, Po-Sheng Chiu and Ying-Hung Pu

This study aims to adopt cloud technology and develop a “cloud bookcase system” to make it possible to provide consistent mobile reading experiences to allow readers to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to adopt cloud technology and develop a “cloud bookcase system” to make it possible to provide consistent mobile reading experiences to allow readers to use all kinds of mobile devices to read e-books.

Design/methodology/approach

This study implements a cloud bookcase and uses four indicators (system quality, information quality, service quality, user satisfaction) to evaluate the system for reading e-books.

Findings

After completing the system, the authors used a questionnaire to evaluate the system. The results show that the quality can meet the needs and satisfaction of users. Subsequent interviews with some of the participants also reveal the biggest concerns of readers include library policy, resources and system quality.

Practical implications

System quality, information quality, service quality and satisfaction are adopted as the indicators to assess the ratings from people using mobile devices to read e-books on the cloud bookcase system developed in this study to evaluate whether the cloud bookcase system is a successful information system as well as the relations between mobile device factors and user ratings. The results indicate that the ratings from more than half of the readers for the system, as shown in the various indicators, achieve more than 60%. From the interview results, the results show that some participants also reveal there is still room for improvement in some areas.

Originality/value

This study implements a cloud bookcase and there are three contributions: (1) the cloud bookcase system developed in this study based on related theories proves able to meet the needs of users, (2) this system had high ratings for all four indicators, (3) the interview responses reveal that most people regard system quality as the most important, and some of the people value some of the items more, including library policy, readers' interests and more resources, especially the number of e-books available.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 15 December 2020

Elisa Tattersall Wallin

The purpose of this paper is to clarify issues related to the contemporary study of audiobook practices, in order to aid subsequent research on topics related to reading

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to clarify issues related to the contemporary study of audiobook practices, in order to aid subsequent research on topics related to reading, digital audiobooks and streaming subscription services.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the concept of remediation, this paper covers four messy issues for audiobook researchers, primarily by developing the concept of reading by listening and then exploring the different remediations of the audiobook, clarifying the audiobook as a book and exploring the context of streaming subscription services.

Findings

Reading is here conceptualised according to the human sense used when making meaning from text, with reading by listening suggested for reading done with the help of the ears. Three different forms of remediation can be seen in subscription-based audiobooks, related to format, content and sense. Audiobooks simultaneously follow traditions of reading aloud, remediates the printed book and previous audiobook formats. It is suggested that the content is what makes an audiobook a book. The concepts library model and bookshop model are introduced to understand different audiobook subscription service models.

Originality/value

This is a research area on the rise with several messy issues and the concepts and clarifications in this paper may benefit future research.

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2010

R. Bruce Jensen

The purpose of this paper is to present evidence that academic and school libraries can serve users by offering readings in phone‐compatible files, and describe how to use…

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2088

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present evidence that academic and school libraries can serve users by offering readings in phone‐compatible files, and describe how to use readily available tools to cleanly and effectively format various types of documents for mobile devices.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was made of a variety of utilities for preparing texts to accommodate mobile reading and the products were tested on several types of phones – from the least sophisticated to popular smartphones.

Findings

Cell phones are effective, convenient appliances for use as text readers. Though US subscribers have been slower than others to embrace their phones as readers, a fast‐growing segment of users is doing so. Course materials traditionally offered as reserves can easily be made available to students on a device that is familiar and comfortable.

Practical implications

Furnishing content in relevant formats increases user convenience and positions libraries to respond to technological change. Providing readings on mobile phones is a move toward the mainstream of today's networked mobile environment.

Social implications

In the USA, people of color and youths have led others in internet access by phone. Libraries, in acknowledging the primacy of mobile devices in people's information universe and providing them with genuinely usable texts, can claim a place in users' pockets, as the commercial sector has already done.

Originality/value

The techniques presented in this paper are within the capabilities of all libraries and can dramatically broaden their service profile, enabling them to bring materials to readers in new, perhaps unexpected ways.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Maria Pinto, Cristina Pouliot and José Antonio Cordón-García

This paper aims to show data about Spanish higher-education students’ usage, habits and perceptions regarding reading on new digital media to show the potential future of…

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2313

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to show data about Spanish higher-education students’ usage, habits and perceptions regarding reading on new digital media to show the potential future of electronic books (e-books) and reading mobile devices (e-readers, tablets, cell phones, etc) in academia. It explores whether demographics and academic factors might influence e-book reading habits and attitudes and university students’ opinions about e-books vs print books. REWIL 2.0, a purpose-built research tool, was applied to measure students’ opinions about digital reading in different media and formats, considering their academic context, at the confluence of analog and digital materials and learning. Likewise, REWIL 2.0 detects who are e-book readers (eBR) and who are not and produces a statistics indicator to identify five categories of eBRs by their frequency of e-book reading. This research gathered 745 online surveys between April and July 2010 in 15 degree programs at the University of Granada: Spanish philology, English philology, history, mathematics, chemistry, environmental sciences, education, library and information science, law, medicine, biology, dentistry, computer systems, architecture and civil engineering.

Design/methodology/approach

This present study is a transversal applied research, where 745 students were surveyed from 15 different academic disciplines offered at the University of Granada (Spain), representing the five main discipline areas. The survey was carried out by means of a structured online survey, with REWIL 2.0 research tool. To ensure internal consistency of correlation between two different survey items designed to measure e-book reading frequency, Pearson’s r reliability test was applied. Likewise, Persons’ chi-squared statistics were applied to test the hypotheses and to detect if significant correlation existed between academic disciplines and e-book reading frequency measured through a Likert scale.

Findings

The present research is motivated by our interest in discovering what effect the current technological maelstrom and the rapid growth of new portable digital reading devices in the Spanish university environment are having on students’ lives, and the extent to which students have adopted new reading technologies. Their first aim is to establish who is reading e-books in the University? A second aim is to answer the following question: is the academic discipline a determinant factor in e-book reading habits and students’ attitudes about it? The authors began by considering the following hypotheses: University students’ attitudes to e-book reading and the way they use them will be determined by the scientific discipline they study. Students of humanities, social sciences and law will prefer to read traditional format books (printed paper), while students of experimental sciences, health and technical courses will prefer reading e-books. Students’ preferences will be determined by their previous reading experiences.

Originality/value

The main objective of the present study is to learn whether there are any notable differences among university students from distinct disciplines with regard to their attitude and behavior toward e-books. The authors, therefore, set out to identify the segment of the student population that does not read e-books yet (non-eBRs) from those who have already read at least one (eBRs), and within this segment, the readers that have read e-books recently (recent eBRs); find out how frequently university students are reading in different formats (paper and digital), document types (book, written press, etc.) and languages (textual, multimodal, etc.) identify what channels are used to access e-books; find out university students’ opinions on the advantages and disadvantages of reading e-books as compared to traditional print books; and identify the types of improvements or changes to the design–production–distribution–reception chain that students consider might help extend e-book reading.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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