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Article

Pieter Ballon

This paper investigates the main trends and uncertainties that will define fourth generation mobile systems and services (4G) in Europe. It outlines two divergent visions…

Abstract

This paper investigates the main trends and uncertainties that will define fourth generation mobile systems and services (4G) in Europe. It outlines two divergent visions on 4G: the so‐called “immediate” 4G vision, consisting of wireless local area networks (WLANs) combined with other wireless access technologies, competing with 3G in the short term, and the so‐called “linear” 4G vision, in which the 3G standard is not replaced until the end of its life cycle by an ultra‐high speed broadband wireless network. Which of these visions will materialise, and what this means for the competitiveness of the main 4G stakeholders in Europe, will be to a large extent determined by which business models are feasible for 4G.

Details

info, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article

Mark de Reuver, Tim de Koning, Harry Bouwman and Wolter Lemstra

The purpose of this paper is to explore how technological and strategic developments enable new billing processes for mobile content services.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how technological and strategic developments enable new billing processes for mobile content services.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews with practitioners are used as input for designing different archetypical role division models for billing and process models. The potential of these process models to reshape the mobile industry is evaluated on three criteria: convenience for the end‐user; potential resource barriers; and the fit with strategic interests of the actors involved.

Findings

Both technological advances and the introduction of new roles and strategies in the mobile domain enable the emergence of alternative billing methods. While network operator‐centric models remain relevant in the short term, in the longer term they will co‐exist with other models in which the customer transaction is owned by the content aggregator, the content provider, the ISP or the payment provider.

Research limitations/implications

The research demonstrates the relevance of analysis at the process level in assessing the feasibility of new role division models at the value creation level.

Practical implications

The emergence of alternative billing providers is expected to change the power balance in the value network and assist in opening up the “walled garden”.

Originality/value

The analysis extends beyond existing discussions on billing in the mobile industry, which typically focus on the value network level, as the process level and the related resources are included. Moreover, the empirical data from the interviews with practitioners at various organizations provide new insights into the feasibility of these models in practice.

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info, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article

Mikko V.J. Heikkinen and Sakari Luukkainen

Mobile peer‐to‐peer communications is an essential phase in the evolution of mobile communications technologies, motivating this research which aims to focus on how

Abstract

Purpose

Mobile peer‐to‐peer communications is an essential phase in the evolution of mobile communications technologies, motivating this research which aims to focus on how established industry stakeholders and new entrants can adapt themselves to the new situation.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on existing literature, the authors identified three distinctive evolution paths for mobile peer‐to‐peer communications and developed an analysis framework for their comparison. The authors validated the analysis by conducting a questionnaire study among domain experts, and analyzed its results using statistical analysis.

Findings

Internet‐driven evolution has high value proposition, is profitable and has subscription fees as an important revenue model. Telecom‐driven evolution creates value, leverages markets, leverages competence, is likely to encounter regulatory intervention and benefits all customer segments. Proprietary evolution has a successful revenue model, results in alliances of competitors and is competence‐enhancing to mobile device vendors.

Research limitations/implications

Future work consists mainly of analyzing quantitatively the implications of the new technologies when they become readily available and evaluating the value analysis framework in other applicable cases.

Practical implications

Internet‐driven evolution enables new business opportunities to independent service operators and equipment vendors by enabling opportunities in profiting from sales of advanced devices and networks. Telecom‐driven evolution benefits mostly incumbent mobile network operators. Proprietary evolution enables limited competition against incumbent actors by independent service operators.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first journal publications on mobile peer‐to‐peer communications from a holistic techno‐economic point of view, beneficial to both academics and practitioners.

Details

info, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article

Pratompong Srinuan, Mohammad Tsani Annafari and Erik Bohlin

The purpose of this paper is to explain the determinant factors of switching behavior in the Thai cellular market before the Mobile Number Portability (MNP) policy is implemented.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explain the determinant factors of switching behavior in the Thai cellular market before the Mobile Number Portability (MNP) policy is implemented.

Design/methodology/approach

A binary logit model and individual survey data from the National Telecommunications Commission 2009 are used to estimate the intention of mobile phone consumers to switch.

Findings

The results show that subscriber characteristics, including age, government officer, self‐employed, internet use, central region, and southern region, are significant in explaining the switching behavior of Thai mobile subscribers. They also indicate that the mobile operators' customers are confronted with different switching costs. The subscribers of the largest mobile operator have the highest switching costs. This study also shows that the largest mobile operators will gain more switching subscribers than smaller operators. The implementation of MNP will help to lower the switching costs of smaller mobile operators rather than of larger operators, as the subscribers of smaller operators are more likely to switch and move to larger mobile operators, as the larger operators provide better quality network coverage. The study shows that the expected impact of implementing MNP without national mobile roaming regulations would be worse for smaller mobile operators. The smaller operators need to compete on both price and quality improvement. In the short run, it would not be possible for the smaller operators to compete with the larger operators due to the inequality in the quality of network coverage.

Originality/value

The result is useful to developing countries considering implementing MNP regulation.

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Article

Christoph Stork

This paper seeks to contribute to the debate about the regulation of termination rates in the context of Africa.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to contribute to the debate about the regulation of termination rates in the context of Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is based on analysis of secondary data and a case study of a regulatory intervention in Namibia and its impact.

Findings

Mobile call termination is a monopoly and not one side of a two‐sided market. Cost‐based termination rates increase competition between operators and lead to lower prices, more subscribers and more investment.

Research limitations/implications

The case of Namibia is presented as an example of termination rate benchmarking as an alternative regulatory strategy to overcome regulatory and institutional bottlenecks in Africa.

Practical implications

African regulators are presented with a tool for removing market distortions.

Social implications

Cost based termination rates will lead to lower retail prices and allow more people to use mobile phones.

Originality/value

The paper presents theoretical and empirical evidence against the waterbed effect and the two‐sided market argument.

Details

info, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article

Donghee Shin and Sungeun Chung

This study aims to analyze how the mobile virtual network operator (MVNO) market in Korea will evolve, the opportunities and/or threats of network operators and how the

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyze how the mobile virtual network operator (MVNO) market in Korea will evolve, the opportunities and/or threats of network operators and how the MVNO market will be forged in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

This study provides competitive analysis, market evaluation and current regulatory assessment of the Korean MVNO marketplace.

Findings

While there are many positive prospects of MVNO in Korea, a series of complicated techno‐economic issues arise.

Practical implications

The current development of MVNO sheds light on the growing challenges of the dynamics of industry, regulation and technology.

Social implications

While MVNOs continue to flourish in some markets, their diffusion in other regions is often very limited and continues to drastically decrease.

Originality/value

The results suggest a sustainable ecosystem of MVNO and propose an appropriate policy to promote MVNO diffusion.

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Article

Lara Srivastava

Outlines Japan’s journey to third‐generation mobile (3G). Posits a number of factors have been responsible for driving Japan in the direction of 3G. Examines developments…

Abstract

Outlines Japan’s journey to third‐generation mobile (3G). Posits a number of factors have been responsible for driving Japan in the direction of 3G. Examines developments in 3G mobile phones and the situation reached in that country. Sums up that there are a number of lessons to be learned from the Japanese experience, notably on market structure.

Details

info, vol. 3 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article

Peter Curwen and Jason Whalley

This paper aims to examine the extent to which the largest international mobile operators are restructuring their network assets to adapt to a rapidly changing environment.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the extent to which the largest international mobile operators are restructuring their network assets to adapt to a rapidly changing environment.

Design/methodology/approach

A number of original databases have been constructed that identify the relevant operators, both current and over an eight-year period, where they operate on a regional basis, their purchases and sales of network assets during those eight years and their unfulfilled aspirations to buy and sell network assets.

Findings

It is reasonably evident that operators have clear strategic objectives when deciding where and when to expand their empires, and that they have a clear preference for regional clustering of assets. However, the paucity of desirable networks for sale means that asset buying has to be opportunistic and that operators come up against problems such as an unwelcoming government or a corrupt regime which makes operators come to regret their initial enthusiasm. In recent years, the emphasis has switched from building empires consisting solely of mobile networks towards the development of multi-play capabilities within a limited number of countries.

Practical implications

Databases are compiled by many organisations for their own purposes. They are usually difficult to interpret because of a lack of explanatory footnotes and often contain mistakes. The authors compile their own unique databases and, therefore, have a better understanding of the reasons why strategic decisions are made that affect the buying and selling of international assets.

Originality/value

The existence of these databases mean that the authors’ work is highly original, even though it is, of necessity, based upon public domain sources.

Details

info, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Understanding 5G Mobile Networks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-036-8

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Article

Anders Henten, Henning Olesen, Dan Saugstrup and Su‐En Tan

This paper has two interrelated purposes. One is to provide an empirical overview of the developments of new mobile systems and services in Europe, Japan, and South Korea…

Abstract

This paper has two interrelated purposes. One is to provide an empirical overview of the developments of new mobile systems and services in Europe, Japan, and South Korea. The other is to examine the discussions regarding the possible explanations for the present lead that East Asia has in new mobile developments. The motivation for making a comparative analysis of mobile developments in Europe, Japan and South Korea is the fact that Japan and South Korea have taken the lead within mobile communications during the last few years, whereas Europe, and in particular the Nordic countries, was leading the way with GSM.

Details

info, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

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