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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2010

George Okechukwu Onatu

High rates of urbanization have concentrated housing needs in urban areas. This has resulted in a large‐scale housing and service backlog. The rapid growth in housing…

Abstract

Purpose

High rates of urbanization have concentrated housing needs in urban areas. This has resulted in a large‐scale housing and service backlog. The rapid growth in housing demand represents a mammoth task for both the present and future housing policy in South Africa. Local government in an effort to address this challenge has placed a high premium on informal settlement formalization and mixed‐income housing development. The rationale behind these two approaches is to address urban poverty, segregation and redevelopment. The purpose of this paper is to appraise mixed‐income housing development with the objective of integration along racial and social grounds and to denounce the negative perception that the poor and rich cannot live side by side, as well as to provide evidence‐based public‐private partnership (PPP) in development.

Design/methodology/approach

The investigation will be based on primary and secondary data with great emphasis on the analysis of the findings of Shift, an NGO, in reviewing the success and challenges of mixed‐income housing development. Both published and unpublished literatures were used equally in the study, as well as focus group discussion and interviews with the beneficiaries as well as the principal developers and City of Johannesburg representatives. These findings will be contextualized to Cosmo City in Johannesburg because this happens to be one of the municipalities with a high rate of migration and attendant housing shortage.

Findings

Integration of the poor into the urban system is achievable with effective and efficient PPP. This investigation also finds that the mixed‐income housing development can lead to an inclusive city and bring about change in the paradigm of criminalization of the poor as being not suitable to live side by side with the rich. Poverty and marginalization can be addressed through carefully planned housing typology.

Originality/value

For mixed‐income housing development to be successful and sustainable, this paper shows there is a need for interactive participation of the end user or beneficiaries. Integration along social and racial lines can be achieved through appropriate housing typology. There is a need for inter‐sectoral collaboration and partnership between the public and private sectors in addressing informal settlement challenge and urban poverty in developing countries.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Dustin C. Read and Drew Sanderford

The purpose of this paper is to examine the development of the Brightwalk community in Charlotte, North Carolina, to explore some of the tradeoffs municipalities make when…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the development of the Brightwalk community in Charlotte, North Carolina, to explore some of the tradeoffs municipalities make when engaging in public–private partnerships designed to support the production of mixed-income housing in urban neighborhoods.

Design/methodology/approach

The results of a gray literature review and a series of in-depth interviews conducted with real estate practitioners familiar with the transaction are presented to evaluate the impact of market forces on key investment decisions and project outcomes.

Findings

Public–private partnerships formed to support mixed-income housing development can serve as an effective means of revitalizing economically stagnant urban areas and improving the quality of the affordable housing stock, but they do not always provide members of the development team with an equally strong incentive to satisfy the unique demands of low-income populations or ensure they have a seat at the table when development decisions are made.

Originality/value

The originality of the research lies in its focus on a public–private partnership led by a non-profit organization to facilitate the redevelopment of a dilapidated market-rate apartment complex into a revitalized mixed-income community, which may help municipalities evaluate the pros and cons of participating in similar development transactions.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Book part
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Shomon Shamsuddin and Lawrence J. Vale

This chapter addresses the related questions of how to assess housing redevelopment and what constitutes a successful redevelopment project, based on the HOPE VI…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter addresses the related questions of how to assess housing redevelopment and what constitutes a successful redevelopment project, based on the HOPE VI transformation of Boston’s Orchard Park from one of the city’s most notorious, crime-ridden public housing projects into a mixed-income community that remained overwhelmingly composed of low-income residents.

Methodology/approach

The analysis is based on a unique set of interviews with a sample of residents before and after housing redevelopment occurred. In addition, we draw upon interviews with housing authority staff, official agency file documents, and archival materials.

Findings

We find increased residential satisfaction after redevelopment but lingering concerns about safety and security despite marked declines in crime. Although the redevelopment process displaced some households, residents attributed improvements in living conditions to changes in tenant composition prompted by the housing transformation.

Social implications

The results suggest an alternative model of public housing redevelopment that accommodates a majority of poor, subsidized households with some displacement. Still, loss of housing units, tenant selection, and social problems complicate notions of successful redevelopment.

Originality/value

This chapter contributes to the literature by showing how some low-income families may benefit from housing displacement induced by the redevelopment process. We analyze an overlooked but frequently implemented approach to housing redevelopment under the HOPE VI program to keep the majority of redeveloped units for low-income residents. It is the only study of which we are aware that has collected public housing resident opinions both before and after HOPE VI redevelopment occurred.

Details

Social Housing and Urban Renewal
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-124-7

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Book part
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Javier Ruiz-Tagle

In this chapter, I focus on stigmatization exercised and experienced by local residents, comparing two socially-diverse areas in very different contexts: the Cabrini…

Abstract

Purpose

In this chapter, I focus on stigmatization exercised and experienced by local residents, comparing two socially-diverse areas in very different contexts: the Cabrini Green-Near North area in Chicago and the La Loma-La Florida area in Santiago de Chile.

Methodology/approach

Data for this study were drawn from 1 year of qualitative research, using interviews with residents and institutional actors, field notes from observation sessions of several inter-group spaces, and “spatial inventories” in which I located the traces of the symbolic presence of each group.

Findings

Despite contextual differences of type of social differentiation, type of social mix, type of housing tenure for the poor, and public visibility, I argue that there are important common problems: first, symbolic differences are stressed by identity changes; second, distrust against “the other” is spatially crystallized in any type and scale of social housing; third, stigmatization changes in form and scale; and fourth, there are persisting prejudiced depictions and patterns of avoidance.

Social implications

Socially-mixed neighborhoods, as areas where at least two different social groups live in proximity, offer an interesting context for observing territorial stigmatization. They are strange creatures of urban development, due to the powerful symbolism of desegregation in contexts of growing inequalities.

Originality/value

The chapter contributes to a cross-national perspective with a comparison of global-north and global-south cities. And it also springs from a study of socially-mixed areas, in which the debate on concentrated/deconcentrated poverty is central, and in which the problem of “clearing places” appears in both material (e.g., displacement) and symbolic (e.g., stigmatization) terms.

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2008

Vedran Vuk

The purpose of this paper aims to explore the reports of housing shortages in post‐Katrina New Orleans especially for low‐income residents in the face of a returning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper aims to explore the reports of housing shortages in post‐Katrina New Orleans especially for low‐income residents in the face of a returning working poor population. Despite the availability of housing vouchers by the New Orleans Housing Authority to any previous residents of New Orleans housing projects, a political uproar has claimed no homes are available and that destroying the previously failing New Orleans housing projects would amount to “forced homelessness.”

Design/methodology/approach

The analysis is done by reflecting on different commentary from persons claiming the housing projects must be preserved while also exploring the failed goals of the same public institutions. Further, a brief overview of the housing situation regarding availability of homes is conducted.

Findings

The findings show that the poor of New Orleans are being misled about available housing, and there is a continuing process of decline in sovereignty of local public policy makers. Politicians benefit by elevating their public persona.

Originality/value

The paper explores the political benefactors of perpetuating falsehoods in order to make political gains.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2019

Biswa Swarup Misra

This paper aims to compute total factor productivity (TFP) growth for India as well as for its 19 major states and to explore the determinants of TFP at the state level by…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to compute total factor productivity (TFP) growth for India as well as for its 19 major states and to explore the determinants of TFP at the state level by considering the spillover effects.

Design/methodology/approach

TFP growth has been obtained using growth accounting equation. Further, the TFP growth estimates were used to derive TFP levels using the translog index procedure. Given the policy focus on building infrastructure and expanding financial access, we have estimated the impact of irrigation, electricity, road, health, education and financial depth on TFP using the Spatial Durbin Model to account for spillover effects.

Findings

Computing TFP growth for two sub periods, namely, 2001-2008 and 2009-2015, the study finds a deterioration in TFP growth for India as well as for 10 of the 19 states under study in the post global financial crisis period. The author find that TFP is positively impacted by irrigation, health and road infrastructure. While financial depth and education were statistically insignificant, installed capacity of electricity had a negative impact on state level TFP.

Research limitations/implications

'The author provides rationale for the empirical findings considering the country context. The findings of this study act as pointers for shaping higher growth on a sustained basis in India. The study helps to assess the productivity growth in the new states, namely, Jharkhand, Chhattisgarh and Uttarakhand, that were carved out in 2000 vis a vis their parent states. This assessment is useful especially for the states of Jharkhand and Chhattisgarh which were created to address economic backwardness in certain pockets of the parent states.

Originality/value

First, it provides TFPG estimates for India as well as 19 major states during the 2000-2015 period. Second, this study helps to understand how TFPG for India as well as each of the 19 states have behaved in the post global financial crisis period. Third, the study helps to assess the productivity growth in the three newly created states in 2000 vis a vis their parent states. Fourth, this is the first attempt which considers the spatial interdependence among the states to estimate the impact of financial and infrastructural development on productivity in the Indian states.

Details

Indian Growth and Development Review, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8254

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Ulrich Kriese

The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of business and marketing strategies pursued by responsible property developers, funds and investors in the USA and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of business and marketing strategies pursued by responsible property developers, funds and investors in the USA and to draw conclusions for future activities in that sector from a transatlantic perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Personal interviews are conducted with 42 developers, fund providers and managers, institutional, nonprofit and major private investors representing more than US$60 billion of responsible property assets under management. The data are complemented by an analysis of promotional documents. A cluster analysis is performed to classify the strategies of the participating companies and institutions and to explore any commonalities and differences.

Findings

Business and marketing strategies in responsible property investment (RPI) can be described and characterised within the three dimensions of location, building and people. RPI activities and investors in the USA usually transcend pure green building and aim to contribute significantly to smart growth, to sustainable urban development and revitalization.

Research limitations/implications

The results in this study are not fully representative of the US RPI community, with the study focussing on the core network of developers, real estate funds and large investors. Furthermore, issues of corporate governance and financial performance are omitted from this study. Interviews are conducted in autumn 2008, i.e. at a time when the major financial crisis reached a global scale, potentially influencing participants' perspectives and subsequent responses.

Practical implications

The findings may help RPI practitioners reflect on business and marketing strategies. European developers, real estate funds and investors can benefit in many respects from US experiences.

Originality/value

The research approach, applied to RPI focussing on business and marketing strategies for the first time, provides new insights for practitioners on both sides of the Atlantic. Above all, the findings may initiate further research to deepen the understanding of the RPI business.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Book part
Publication date: 13 April 2011

Bruce D. Meyer and James X. Sullivan

We examine the relationship between the business cycle and poverty for the period from 1960 to 2008 using income data from the Current Population Survey and consumption…

Abstract

We examine the relationship between the business cycle and poverty for the period from 1960 to 2008 using income data from the Current Population Survey and consumption data from the Consumer Expenditure Survey. This new evidence on the relationship between macroeconomic conditions and poverty is of particular interest, given recent changes in antipoverty policies that have placed greater emphasis on participation in the labor market and in-kind transfers. We look beyond official poverty, examining alternative income poverty and consumption poverty, which have conceptual and empirical advantages as measures of the well-being of the poor. We find that both income and consumption poverty are sensitive to macroeconomic conditions. A 1 percentage point increase in unemployment is associated with an increase in the after-tax income poverty rate of 0.9–1.1 percentage points in the long run, and an increase in the consumption poverty rate of 0.3–1.2 percentage points in the long run. The evidence on whether income is more responsive to the business cycle than consumption is mixed. Income poverty does appear to be more responsive using national level variation, but consumption poverty is often more responsive to unemployment when using regional variation. Low percentiles of both income and consumption are sensitive to macroeconomic conditions, and in most cases, low percentiles of income appear to be more responsive than low percentiles of consumption.

Details

Who Loses in the Downturn? Economic Crisis, Employment and Income Distribution
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-749-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Clayton Preston

East Lake Commons is a 67 home mixed-use, mixed-income in-fill community in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. The community planning process began in 1997, and construction was…

Abstract

East Lake Commons is a 67 home mixed-use, mixed-income in-fill community in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. The community planning process began in 1997, and construction was substantially complete by 2000. East Lake Commons successfully incorporates a wide range of ecological and social concepts, including those of Atlanta Regional Commission and the US Environmental Protection Agency. In addition, the project has established new practices such as Handicap Visitability that is influencing national policy makers.

Details

Open House International, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 August 2008

M. Kozlowski and S. Huston

The purpose of this paper is to consider the impact of urban design master plan projects in the Australian context of Brisbane. It first reviewed the general ramifications…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the impact of urban design master plan projects in the Australian context of Brisbane. It first reviewed the general ramifications of urban design projects on property markets. The local impacts of two major projects were then analysed and compared. A limited statistical analysis was conducted to investigate whether local price growth could be attributed to the projects or resulted from generally buoyant market conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopted a largely descriptive approach. It first reviewed the theoretical outcomes urban design projects should deliver. It then looked at the specific details of two distinct urban design projects in Brisbane and descriptively assessed their impact on adjacent local housing markets. It then compared relative aggregated location price growth to isolate discernable project price effects. Finally, the paper anecdotally selected some master designed properties and considered whether their prices were excessive compared to average location rents.

Findings

The paper found conflicting evidence to support the view that urban design projects significantly lifted aggregated location prices. On the one hand, aggregated project location price growth was relatively muted. Other generic demand factors and local differences in housing stock quality swamped project effects. On the other hand, at the individual property level, there was some anecdotal evidence to suggest premiums were paid for urban designed homes. The paper indirectly suggests, then, that any price impacts of urban design projects are subject to rapid distance decay.

Research limitations/implications

The paper conducted only a limited historical review of revitalisation and urban design. A systematic individual, project‐adjacent, property price analysis was not conducted. Rather, the aggregated dwelling price analysis and anecdotal rental review suggested, albeit inconclusively, that the effects of urban design are spatially restricted to the immediate vicinity of projects.

Practical implications

Investors should note likely price impact of planned infrastructure projects is spatially restricted to the immediate environs of the project.

Originality/value

The paper combines an overview of urban design and property market analysis.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

Keywords

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