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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Gillian King, Nicole Thomson, Mitchell Rothstein, Shauna Kingsnorth and Kathryn Parker

One of the major issues faced by academic health science centers (AHSCs) is the need for mechanisms to foster the integration of research, clinical, and educational…

Abstract

Purpose

One of the major issues faced by academic health science centers (AHSCs) is the need for mechanisms to foster the integration of research, clinical, and educational activities to achieve the vision of evidence-informed decision making (EIDM) and optimal client care. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper synthesizes literature on organizational learning and collaboration, evidence-informed organizational decision making, and learning-based organizations to derive insights concerning the nature of effective workplace learning in AHSCs.

Findings

An evidence-informed model of collaborative workplace learning is proposed to aid the alignment of research, clinical, and educational functions in AHSCs. The model articulates relationships among AHSC academic functions and sub-functions, cross-functional activities, and collaborative learning processes, emphasizing the importance of cross-functional activities in enhancing collaborative learning processes and optimizing EIDM and client care. Cross-functional activities involving clinicians, researchers, and educators are hypothesized to be a primary vehicle for integration, supported by a learning-oriented workplace culture. These activities are distinct from interprofessional teams, which are clinical in nature. Four collaborative learning processes are specified that are enhanced in cross-functional activities or teamwork: co-constructing meaning, co-learning, co-producing knowledge, and co-using knowledge.

Practical implications

The model provides an aspirational vision and insight into the importance of cross-functional activities in enhancing workplace learning. The paper discusses the conceptual and empirical basis to the model, its contributions and limitations, and implications for AHSCs.

Originality/value

The model’s potential utility for health care is discussed, with implications for organizational culture and the promotion of cross-functional activities.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Mitchell G. Rothstein, Ronald J. Burke and Julia M. Bristor

This study investigated a series of hypotheses stemming from Ibarra's (1993) proposed conceptual framework for understanding differences between women's and men's…

Abstract

This study investigated a series of hypotheses stemming from Ibarra's (1993) proposed conceptual framework for understanding differences between women's and men's interpersonal networks. Using a sample of 112 managers, we examined differences between women's and men's network structural characteristics, and the relationships between these characteristics and support benefits obtained. Consistent with Ibarra, we found that certain network characteristics varied considerably between women and men managers. Women and men tended to belong to different networks in their organizations. Although both groups obtained similar amounts of support from their networks, women managers received their support from substantially different networks, characterized by lower levels of status and power in their organizations. Results are interpreted with respect to Ibarra's theoretical propositions concerning differences between women's and men's networks in organizations.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

James Rettig

All seventeen had graciously agreed to my proposal to gather for a small conference to seek consensus. A generous grant from the Pierian Press Foundation would cover all…

Abstract

All seventeen had graciously agreed to my proposal to gather for a small conference to seek consensus. A generous grant from the Pierian Press Foundation would cover all of our expenses for a long weekend at a resort hotel; the only condition of the grant was that we offer our results to Reference Services Review for first publication. Over the past five years each of the seventeen had in turn accepted my challenge to answer the following question:

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Ronald J. Burke, Mitchell G. Rothstein and Julia M. Bristor

Presents descriptive information on interpersonal networks, bothinside and outside of one′s organization, among managerial andprofessional women and men. Sex differences…

Abstract

Presents descriptive information on interpersonal networks, both inside and outside of one′s organization, among managerial and professional women and men. Sex differences were also examined. Data were collected from 57 women and 55 men in early and mid‐career stages using questionnaires. Respondents indicated an average of 4.9 individuals in their inside networks and 2.8 individuals in their outside networks. There was a higher percentage of men in both networks, but the difference was smaller in outside than in inside networks. Respondents interacted with inside and outside network members about once a week. Inside network members held staff rather than line jobs, were at slightly higher organizational levels and were only modestly connected to powerful organizational leaders. Outside networks consisted mostly of friends and spouses. The networks of women and men had some differences. Women′s networks contained more women than did men′s networks. Women also received a greater number of developmental functions from their outside network, with a similar tendency from their inside network as well.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1995

Ronald J. Burke, Julia M. Bristor and Mitchell G. Rothstein

Describes an exploratory study to examine the interpersonalnetworks of managerial women and men. Women and men indicated allpotentially supportive relationships they had…

Abstract

Describes an exploratory study to examine the interpersonal networks of managerial women and men. Women and men indicated all potentially supportive relationships they had both inside and outside their organizations. Data were collected from 57 women and 55 men using questionnaires. Includes also potential antecedents of such relationships (individual demographic, work environment), consequences (job satisfaction, career success, job involvement) and network characteristics (number of individuals, frequency of interactions, development functions provided). Finds that all respondents indicate having network members both inside and outside their organizations. Insiders are more numerous than outsiders. Finally hierarchical regression analyses indicate few effects of developmental functions from network members on work and career outcomes when personal and work setting characteristics are controlled.

Details

International Journal of Career Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6214

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1995

Mitchell G. Rothstein and Liane M. Davey

Examines gender differences in networking characteristics andbenefits in a sample of university faculty. Generates hypotheses fromIbarra′s theoretical framework for…

Abstract

Examines gender differences in networking characteristics and benefits in a sample of university faculty. Generates hypotheses from Ibarra′s theoretical framework for explaining differences between women′s and men′s interpersonal networks. Finds significant differences between women and men, but, contrary to Ibarra′s theory of interpersonal networks, some of these differences favour women.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Filip Roodhooft and Alexandra Van den Abbeele

The aim of this paper is to shed light on the procurement process of consulting services within the public sector and to benchmark the obtained results with practices in…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to shed light on the procurement process of consulting services within the public sector and to benchmark the obtained results with practices in the private sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A two‐stage research design has been used. First, in‐depth personal interviews were conducted with six users of consulting services. The second stage involved a cross‐sectional survey of purchasers of a broad range of business advisory services. This included private as well as public purchasers.

Findings

It was found that the procurement process of consulting services in the public sector differs significantly from that of private companies. Further analyses indicate that purchasers from public and private organizations are equally satisfied with the results of consulting services.

Research limitations/implications

The results of the study indicate that public sector organizations may need to develop new buying skills in market management, specification, competitive process, negotiation regulation and monitoring.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that a more high‐level management involvement is needed, recognizing the importance of the procurement function within the public sector and supporting highly trained staff in implementing strategic procurement initiatives.

Originality/value

The study provides unique insights on how consulting services are purchased in the public sector as well as in the private sector. Furthermore, the paper illustrates which purchase practices explain the satisfaction level of purchasers of consulting services.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Book part
Publication date: 11 May 2007

Michael Shalev

The difficulties that MR poses for comparativists were anticipated 40 years ago in Sidney Verba's essay “Some Dilemmas of Comparative Research”, in which he called for a…

Abstract

The difficulties that MR poses for comparativists were anticipated 40 years ago in Sidney Verba's essay “Some Dilemmas of Comparative Research”, in which he called for a “disciplined configurative approach…based on general rules, but on complicated combinations of them” (Verba, 1967, p. 115). Charles Ragin's (1987) book The Comparative Method eloquently spelled out the mismatch between MR and causal explanation in comparative research. At the most basic level, like most other methods of multivariate statistical analysis MR works by rendering the cases invisible, treating them simply as the source of a set of empirical observations on dependent and independent variables. However, even when scholars embrace the analytical purpose of generalizing about relationships between variables, as opposed to dwelling on specific differences between entities with proper names, the cases of interest in comparative political economy are limited in number and occupy a bounded universe.2 They are thus both knowable and manageable. Consequently, retaining named cases in the analysis is an efficient way of conveying information and letting readers evaluate it.3 Moreover, in practice most producers and consumers of comparative political economy are intrinsically interested in specific cases. Why not cater to this interest by keeping our cases visible?

Details

Capitalisms Compared
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-414-0

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Book part
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Natalie Kuldell and Rudolph Mitchell

We describe an introductory class in biological engineering that uses project-based and mentored inquiry to create a supportive, exciting, and effective learning…

Abstract

We describe an introductory class in biological engineering that uses project-based and mentored inquiry to create a supportive, exciting, and effective learning environment. Freshman students at MIT work in small teams and with senior MIT students to design a biotechnology that addresses a real-world challenge of their choosing. Students gain familiarity with the tools and vocabulary for biodesign first through some hands-on experiences with synthetic biological systems and later by working in teams to define, present and then refine their ideas. A multiyear study of the class experience and impact included postsurveys and semistructured interviews of two freshman cohorts and a retrospective survey of three freshman cohorts. Data support the claim that students perceive academic gains through their project-based classroom experience. Freshmen reported they are better able to understand content in some of their other MIT courses, are better able to read scientific articles, and now think differently about biology. Moreover, they indicated the class was valuable in learning technical content and synthetic biology. We find this project-based class helps students make meaningful connections to scientific ideas, to personal goals and to a vision of their future selves.

Details

Inquiry-Based Learning for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (Stem) Programs: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-850-2

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