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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Michael A. Bourlakis, Mitchell R. Ness and Constantinos ‐ Vasilios Priporas

The paper reports the results of a study of food shopping behaviour in Greece. It is concerned with establishing the dimensions underlyingshoppers’ evaluations of their…

Abstract

The paper reports the results of a study of food shopping behaviour in Greece. It is concerned with establishing the dimensions underlying shoppers’ evaluations of their regular supermarket store attributes, exploring the existence of shopper segments and subsequently, identifying the segments in terms of shopping behaviour and attitudes to store features. The main research instrument is a survey of adult Greek grocery shoppers in the metropolitan area of the city of Thessaloniki. The empirical results indicate that there are three dimensions that underlie the importance of store features. These are defined respectively as ‘Store design and variety’, ‘Personnel and service’, and ‘Convenient location’. The application of cluster analysis to the dimensions factor scores reveals four clusters. The characteristics of each cluster are described by average factor scores on the dimensions of store features, demographic characteristics, attitudes to store features, store loyalty, and motives for regular store choice.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1991

Leslie Gofton and Mitchell Ness

The twin trends of health and convenience which have resulted inchanging food consumption patterns are outlined. Research amongconsumers confirmed that there is awareness…

1127

Abstract

The twin trends of health and convenience which have resulted in changing food consumption patterns are outlined. Research among consumers confirmed that there is awareness and concern about the relationship between health and diet; food scares have brought confusion; and the better educated are more food‐conscious. Changing lifestyles and the changing role of women are shown to affect food habits.

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British Food Journal, vol. 93 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Li‐Wei Mai and Mitchell R. Ness

Analyses customer satisfaction with mail‐order speciality foods in the UK and examines the relationship between satisfaction with eight attributes of mail‐order speciality…

2623

Abstract

Analyses customer satisfaction with mail‐order speciality foods in the UK and examines the relationship between satisfaction with eight attributes of mail‐order speciality food and their association with overall satisfaction and likelihood of future purchase. Univariate analysis reveals that a high proportion of mail‐order customers experience satisfaction with each of the eight mail‐order attributes, reflected in a high proportion of customers who are satisfied overall and who intend to repurchase the products in the future. Canonical correlation analysis reveals a statistically significant relationship between one set of variables, overall satisfaction and likelihood of future purchase, and another set of variables, the eight mail‐order attributes. Consequently the results indicate that customer satisfaction is associated with service aspects of mail‐order such as the order process and delivery service as well as physical product attributes such as product quality.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 101 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Mitchell R. Ness and Hubert Gerhardy

Illustrates the use of conjoint analysis, a multivariate technique forthe analysis of consumer preferences for multiple attribute productswith an application to freshness…

2675

Abstract

Illustrates the use of conjoint analysis, a multivariate technique for the analysis of consumer preferences for multiple attribute products with an application to freshness and quality attributes of eggs. Establishes general and specific background issues and explains the technique of conjoint analysis. Discusses aspects of research design. Summarizes the empirical results with emphasis on the interpretation of the model and its use for simulation analyses.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 96 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1990

Mitchell R. Ness and Stephen Walker

The results of qualitative and quantitative research intodifferentiation of compounds feeds are presented. The aim of thequalitative research is to define the compound…

Abstract

The results of qualitative and quantitative research into differentiation of compounds feeds are presented. The aim of the qualitative research is to define the compound feeds as product attributes in the context of marketing mix elements in order to understand product differentiation amongst products. The framework of the qualitative research is employed in the quantitative research where price and cost data for feed products are collected and related to the product attributes. Quantitative analysis is employed to identify some characteristics of products. Compound feeds can be defined as a set of product/service attributes. Both prices and costs can be related to these. The quantitative analysis reveals that whilst there is significant variation in the prices and costs of compounds in the same product category, the relative variation is greater for some product groups than others and that these categories form natural product groups.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 92 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1991

Mitchell R. Ness and Stephen Walker

In marketing, products are defined as a series of attributes whichextend beyond the concept of physical aspects of the product. Thisconcept is applied to the definition of…

Abstract

In marketing, products are defined as a series of attributes which extend beyond the concept of physical aspects of the product. This concept is applied to the definition of compound animal feeds. The development of the industry is described and evidence presented to establish the degree of seller concentration. Qualitative research, in the form of in‐depth interviews, is employed to identify the relevant product‐service attributes of compound feeds in the context of the marketing mix. Subsequently, some of the more recent changes in the industry are discussed in the context of this framework and from the perspective of impending change in the marketing mix.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1992

Mitchell R. Ness

Corporate social responsibility is a strategic decision whereby anorganization undertakes an obligation to society, for example in theform of sponsorship, commitment to…

5913

Abstract

Corporate social responsibility is a strategic decision whereby an organization undertakes an obligation to society, for example in the form of sponsorship, commitment to local communities, attention to environmental issues and responsible advertising. The impact of organizational decisions on society in the wider sense has been in evidence in the agricultural and food industries in association with merger and takeover activity, environmental pollution, intensive livestock production, hygiene, health and international marketing practices. Social responsibility has been given credibility through the attention given to social issues by the Confederation of British Industry, the European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management and is of immediate relevance to the UK food sector because of the recent initiative of the Institute of Grocery Distribution. First considers social responsibility within a corporate strategy framework and subsequently deals with some theoretical and practical issues in the context of the UK food and agricultural sector.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 94 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Li‐Wei Mai and Mitchell Ness

The objectives of the study are to examine consumer attitudes to mail‐order speciality food products on the basis of a survey of mail order shoppers. The particular…

Abstract

The objectives of the study are to examine consumer attitudes to mail‐order speciality food products on the basis of a survey of mail order shoppers. The particular question which is addressed in the paper is concerned with the benefits perceived by mail‐order speciality food customers. Specifically, it identifies the perceived benefits associated with mail‐order, then establishes the underlying dimensions of these benefits and, finally, investigates the existence of customer segments on the basis of benefits sought. Consumers’ perceptions of the benefits of mail‐order emphasise quality, uniqueness and convenience. However, underlying these attributes are four main dimensions of customer relations and service, convenience, nostalgia and uniqueness. Furthermore, it is possible to identify two consumer segments of active mail‐order shoppers in terms of a product‐oriented group and a mail‐order‐oriented group.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 100 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Mitchell R. Ness and Stephen Walker

Considers the incidence of average cost pricing in the compoundfeed industry in the context of strategic and marketing aspects offirms′ behaviour. The empirical analysis…

972

Abstract

Considers the incidence of average cost pricing in the compound feed industry in the context of strategic and marketing aspects of firms′ behaviour. The empirical analysis uses a cross‐section econometric model derived from the Koutsoyiannis model of average cost pricing and incorporating assumptions about cost and price adjustment. The model is estimated using primary data on prices and costs for a sample of firms in the North of England for main categories of compound feed products. The results indicate support for the hypothesis in association with these adjustment factors which accommodate both cost and strategic influences within product segments of the market.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 97 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Susan Miles, Mary Brennan, Sharron Kuznesof, Mitchell Ness, Christopher Ritson and Lynn J. Frewer

Consumers may encounter a number of potential food hazards through their food choice decisions and consumption behaviour. It is psychologically determined risk perceptions…

4868

Abstract

Consumers may encounter a number of potential food hazards through their food choice decisions and consumption behaviour. It is psychologically determined risk perceptions that drive acceptance of such potential food hazards, and define people's risk‐taking or self‐protective behaviours. As such, it is necessary to understand exactly what consumers are worried about. Food issues of concern to consumers were identified in a previous exploratory focus group study. A list of 18 food safety issues was developed for the purpose of the study reported here, with the aim of comparing worry about the different issues and investigating any demographic differences. Factor analysis indicated that attitudes to the 18 food safety issues reflected two underlying constructs, the first relating to technological food issues and the second to lifestyle food issues. In general, people were more worried about technological food hazards compared to lifestyle hazards. Demographic differences were observed for gender, age and social class, but not for geographical region, or having children; furthermore, experience of food allergy or intolerance increased worry about technological issues.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 106 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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