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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Christian Voegtlin, Ina Maria Walthert and Diana C. Robertson

The chapter examines to what extent research from social cognitive neuroscience can inform ethical leadership. We evaluate the contribution of brain research to the…

Abstract

The chapter examines to what extent research from social cognitive neuroscience can inform ethical leadership. We evaluate the contribution of brain research to the understanding of ethical leaders as moral persons as well the understanding of their role as moral managers. The areas of social cognitive neuroscience that mirror these two aspects of ethical leadership comprise research relating to understanding oneself, understanding others, and the relationship between the self and others. Within these, we deem it relevant for ethical leadership to incorporate research findings about self-reflection, self-regulation, theory of mind, empathy, trust, and fairness. The chapter highlights social cognitive neuroscience research in these areas and discusses its actual and potential contributions to ethical leadership. The chapter thereby engages also with the broader discussion on the neuroscience of leadership. We suggest new avenues for future research in the field of leadership ethics and responsibility.

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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Preethi Misha and Marius van Dijke

To date, the vast majority of existing research on unethical leadership has focused on top leaders’ actions and behaviors as the primary catalyst for the permeation of…

Abstract

To date, the vast majority of existing research on unethical leadership has focused on top leaders’ actions and behaviors as the primary catalyst for the permeation of unethical behaviors in organizations. In this chapter, we shift the focus to middle and junior managers and argue that they too have an active role in contributing to the permeation of top-level unethical leadership. More specifically, we adopt a meaning-making lens to investigate how junior and middle-level managers perceive and interpret top-level unethical leadership and how such meaning-making affects their (un)ethical legitimacy. Understanding the role played by lower-level managers becomes vitally important to develop a more holistic picture of the permeation of unethical leadership. Findings from 30 in-depth interviews with top, middle, and junior managers reveal variables such as survival, group membership, and strain as buttressing meaning-making by lower-level managers. Findings also revealed two contrasting aspects, that is, “interactions” within organizational members as well as “silence” by top-level managers playing into individuals’ information processing and attribution capacities during ethical dilemmas. Real cases experienced by participants pertaining to the flow of unethical leadership illustrate how the central bearings play out in managerial practice.

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2018

Raad Abdulkareem Shareef and Tarik Atan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of ethical leadership on followers’ organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and turnover intention and to examine the…

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3277

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of ethical leadership on followers’ organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) and turnover intention and to examine the mediating role of intrinsic motivation in the relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a quantitative research method with a sample of 351 supervisor–subordinate dyads in three large public universities in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. The statistical analysis was conducted using Statistical Package for Social Science software, through multiple regression analyses to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicated that ethical leadership positively related to OCB and negatively related to turnover intentions. The results also showed that intrinsic motivation fully mediates the relationship between ethical leadership, OCB, and turnover intentions.

Originality/value

This study recognized the gap in the literature, and it contributes to the body of knowledge through an examination of the mediating role of intrinsic motivation between ethical leadership, OCB and turnover intention, relying on the cognitive evaluation theory.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 57 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 12 September 2014

Jonathan Furneaux and Craig Furneaux

The purpose of this chapter is to analyse the deviant behaviour of individuals in organisations. Deviants are those who depart from organisational norms. A typology of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this chapter is to analyse the deviant behaviour of individuals in organisations. Deviants are those who depart from organisational norms. A typology of perceived deviant behaviour is developed from the deviance literature, and subsequently tested.

Methodology/approach

Star Trek: Into Darkness text is qualitatively analysed as a data source. Three different character arcs are analysed in relation to organisational deviance. Starfleet is the specific, fictional, organisational context.

Findings

We found that the typology of deviance is conceptually robust, and facilitates categorisation of different types of deviant behaviour, over time.

Research limitations/implications

Deviance is socially ascribed; so better categorisation of such behaviour improves our understanding of how specific behaviour might deviate from organisational norms, and how different behaviours can mean individuals can be viewed positively or negatively over time.

Further research might determine management responses to the different forms of deviance, and unpack the processes where individuals eschew ‘averageness’ and become deviants.

Practical implications

The typology advanced has descriptive validity to describe deviant behaviour.

Social implications

Social institutions such as organisations ascribe individual deviants, both negatively and positively.

Originality/value

This chapter extends our understanding of positive and negative deviance in organisations by developing a new typology of deviant behaviour. This typology has descriptive validity in understanding deviant behaviour. Our understanding of both positive and negative deviance in organisational contexts is enhanced, as well as the utility of science fiction literature in ethical analysis.

Details

The Contribution of Fiction to Organizational Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-949-2

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Article
Publication date: 24 December 2020

Nor Farah Hanis Zainun, Johanim Johari and Zurina Adnan

The objective of this study is to examine the predicting role of Machiavellianism, locus of control and moral identity on ethical leadership. This study also assessed the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study is to examine the predicting role of Machiavellianism, locus of control and moral identity on ethical leadership. This study also assessed the moderating role of ethical role modelling in the linkage between Machiavellianism, locus of control, moral identity and ethical leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 202 public service leaders in Malaysia participated in the study. A quantitative study was conducted and structural equation modelling was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Moral identity poses a substantial influence on ethical leadership. Ethical role modelling is a significant moderator in the association between moral identity and ethical leadership.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the social learning theory by assessing Machiavellianism, locus of control and moral identity as the predictors of ethical leadership among public service leaders in Malaysia. Future study can be further extended to both managerial and support staff to understand the ethical phenomenon in Malaysian public sector.

Practical implications

The study highlights the need for public sector to give considerable attention to moral identity in boosting ethical leadership among public service leaders in Malaysia's public sector. Furthermore, the element of ethical role modelling should not be neglected as this factor is a valid moderator in nurturing ethical leadership among public service leaders.

Originality/value

The study deepens the knowledge on the importance of ethical role modelling as a moderator in assessing the influence of the predictors on ethical leadership. Further, this study demonstrates that public service leaders who reported high moral identity would have higher ethical leadership if they experienced good ethical role modelling.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 41 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2018

Ahmad Nasser Abuzaid

Organizations with committed employees create a sustainable high-performance and stable environment over the long term. Leadership should be a key component determining…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations with committed employees create a sustainable high-performance and stable environment over the long term. Leadership should be a key component determining organizational commitment. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between ethical leadership and its association to employee commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative method was chosen for this study because the objective was to correlate variables and predict a set of outcomes. Employees from 13 commercial banks listed in Amman Stock Exchange completed a survey designed to gather their perceptions of study variables.

Findings

The results show that there is a positive and significant relationship between ethical leadership and two components of organizational commitment, namely, affective commitment and normative commitment. Additionally, the results show that there is no relationship between ethical leadership and continuous commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in the banking sector of Jordan. Therefore, the results may not generalize to other sectors. Additionally, this study might have self-selection and non-response bias. This occurs when the entities in the sample are given a choice to participate. If a set of members in the sample decides not to participate, it reduces the ability to generalize the results to the entire population.

Practical implications

Managers should strive to enhance the levels of both affective and normative commitment in their organizations and that the ethical leadership of managers plays a significant role in developing employees and ethical organizational cultures.

Originality/value

To date, there has been little empirical research regarding the relationship between ethical leadership and its influence on organizational commitment, and, as such, this study has been beneficial in its contribution to the early body of knowledge of ethical leaderships which provides confirmatory evidence about a significant effect that perceived ethical leadership has on organizational.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 34 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Dharmasri Wickramasinghe and Vathsala Wickramasinghe

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating effect of perceived organisational support (POS) on the relationship between participation in decision making (PDM…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating effect of perceived organisational support (POS) on the relationship between participation in decision making (PDM) and affective commitment, and PDM and job satisfaction in lean production in Sri Lanka.

Design/methodology/approach

A random sample of 616 shop‐floor employees engaged full‐time in export‐apparel manufacturing firms, which have implemented a formal lean production system in the whole manufacturing function and where lean production has become the standard of operation for at least one year in Sri Lanka, responded. Regression analysis was used to test hypotheses.

Findings

It was found that POS moderates the relationship between PDM and affective commitment, and PDM and job satisfaction.

Originality/value

The literature suggests that the bottom‐line changes often cited in lean implementation success stories, such as reduced inventories and faster flow times, are not the only results that should be considered. The potential detrimental effects on employees should be considered as well, or turnover and morale problems may sabotage the effectiveness of such implementations. However, the manner in which the lean production environment influences employee behaviour has received scant empirical attention. The findings of this study provide interesting implications to practice and will be a source of general guidance in stimulating future research in this area.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Book part
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Scott J. Reynolds and Eunhee Bae

A cursory review of behavioral ethics research reveals a growing interest in what scholars regularly refer to as the “dark side,” a genre of studies in which concepts that…

Abstract

A cursory review of behavioral ethics research reveals a growing interest in what scholars regularly refer to as the “dark side,” a genre of studies in which concepts that are generally regarded as positive and good are shown to be associated with some sort of negative or bad outcomes. We employ philosophical and institutional lenses to explain why any concept would have a dark side and why researchers would be drawn to it. We then take a social scientific point of view to consider how the dark side of various constructs is typically revealed. Finally, we discuss the implications of dark side research, paying particular attention to the negative implications (no irony intended) focusing on the dark side has for the practice of research and the practice of management.

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Marco Tavanti and Anna Tait

This chapter reviews ethical challenges confronting nonprofit administration in relation to organizational managerial practices and leadership behaviors. Through a…

Abstract

This chapter reviews ethical challenges confronting nonprofit administration in relation to organizational managerial practices and leadership behaviors. Through a theoretical model of nonprofit-specific toxic leadership, it reviews the dynamics of destructive leaders, susceptible followers, and conducive environments in cases of unethical and corrupt nonprofit organizational behaviors. It provides a case for prioritizing oversight responsibilities of the board of directors, board supervision, promoting ethical culture in organizational leadership, and implementing policies for addressing destructive and corrupt nonprofit leaders. It reflects on how nonprofit toxic leadership primarily erodes public trust in the nonprofit sector and concludes with practical recommendations for recentering positive behaviors congruent with the nonprofit's social and public good mission.

Details

Destructive Leadership and Management Hypocrisy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-180-5

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Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2021

Wallace A. Burns

There are several permutations of destructive leadership types. Most involve active leadership actions, but some involve passive actions (or lack of leadership). A review…

Abstract

There are several permutations of destructive leadership types. Most involve active leadership actions, but some involve passive actions (or lack of leadership). A review of the literature reveals a relative dearth of root causes of destructive leadership type, but a reasonable sampling of causal factors and predictors of destructive leadership results. The author focuses on three relevant and representative destructive leadership types: Pseudotransformational, Laissez-Faire, and Unethical, and scoured the literature for root causes, causal factors, and predictors related to each. He further compared and contrasted these leadership types to differentiate their similarities and differences and discussed the causal factors and predictors associated with the operationalization of these leadership styles.

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