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Article
Publication date: 30 March 2022

Rajesh Iyer, Barry J. Babin, Jacqueline K. Eastman and Mitch Griffin

This study explores consumers' motivations to purchase luxury and counterfeit products using an international sample. In addition, it also examines the moderating role of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores consumers' motivations to purchase luxury and counterfeit products using an international sample. In addition, it also examines the moderating role of interpersonal influence on this process. This study seeks to examine if the consumers who demand the highest quality express a preference for luxury goods over counterfeit goods.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey research was employed to subjects from the USA, India, China and Russia. Responses from US and India consumers were collected using online software, whereas responses from China and Russia were collected with the help of a local market research firm.

Findings

The findings of the study indicate that consumers tend to show similar reactions based on the luxury and counterfeit consumption process examined here. In terms of interpersonal influence as a moderator, however, the study found it significantly impacts status seekers' attitude toward luxury and how a perfectionist shopper perceives counterfeit consumption.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first in the literature to empirically address both luxury and counterfeit consumption. Further it considers consumers from multiple countries with high levels of luxury good purchases.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2005

Barry J. Babin, Yong‐Ki Lee, Eun‐Ju Kim and Mitch Griffin

The research seeks to extend the notions of utilitarian and hedonic value to account for outcomes of consumer service encounters.

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Abstract

Purpose

The research seeks to extend the notions of utilitarian and hedonic value to account for outcomes of consumer service encounters.

Design/methodology/approach

The research question is examined using a sample of Korean restaurant consumers who used a structured questionnaire to evaluate their dining experience. Structural equations analysis is used to test various research hypotheses and examine the extent to which consumer service value mediates the effect of the environment on customer satisfaction and future intentions.

Findings

Key findings include the ability of the consumer service value scale to account for utilitarian and hedonic value, the role of functional and affective service environment components in shaping consumer satisfaction and future patronage intentions and the relative diagnosticity of positive affect.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need to extend the results to a diverse range of cultures.

Practical implications

Restaurant managers should place increased emphasis on the physical environment as it clearly plays a role in creating positive consumer outcomes and building strong customer relationships.

Originality/value

The use of the consumer value scale (CSV) – particularly in a novel service context.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2000

Julie T. Johnson, Rodger W. Griffeth and Mitch Griffin

Examines turnover functionality (high‐ and low‐performing quitters and stayers) in a business‐to‐business sales setting. Prior research indicates that antecedents of…

3954

Abstract

Examines turnover functionality (high‐ and low‐performing quitters and stayers) in a business‐to‐business sales setting. Prior research indicates that antecedents of turnover frequency and turnover functionality are different. However, this may be an artifact of the way in which turnover has been measured. This study develops a new criterion of turnover functionality. Additionally, common antecedents of turnover frequency were examined to see if they could differentiate between high‐ and low‐performing quitters and stayers. The results indicate that several antecedents associated with turnover frequency are able to discriminate among different groups of high‐ and low‐performing quitters and stayers. Specifically, satisfaction with promotion, supervision, work, and global satisfaction contribute to our understanding of turnover functionality. Additionally, role conflict, role ambiguity, anxiety, evaluation of job alternatives, and intention to quit are also good discriminators of turnover functionality.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 15 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Julie Moulard, Barry J. Babin and Mitch Griffin

The purpose of this paper is to explore how two aspects of place affect consumers’ authenticity perceptions of a wine and their willingness to pay for it. One aspect of…

1621

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how two aspects of place affect consumers’ authenticity perceptions of a wine and their willingness to pay for it. One aspect of place is the wine’s country of origin, specifically Old World versus New World wines. A second aspect of place is the technical terroir. A description of the terroir that is highly specific was expected to be perceived as more authentic and offer more value than a vague terroir description.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 109 US adults participated in an online 2 × 2 experiment in which authenticity, willingness to pay and expertise were measured. ANCOVA and MANCOVA were used to analyze the data.

Findings

Subjects perceived the Old World wine as more authentic and were willing to pay more for it than the New World wine. Additionally, country of origin moderated the effect of terroir specificity on authenticity and willingness to pay. For New World wines, wine with specific information about the terroir was perceived as more authentic and more valuable than wine with vague terroir information. The opposite was found for the Old World wine. Finally, authenticity mediated the effect of this interaction on willingness to pay.

Research limitations/implications

The sample limits generalizability, and the study design involved only a text description of the wine. While the description allowed control, future research should include a measure following an actual taste of the wine.

Practical implications

The implications concern the strength of the Old World wine stereotypes and the means of marketing wines from less traditional wine-producing regions. The Old World wines provide a quality signal that need not be reinforced by a specific description of the technical terroir. In contrast, a specific description of the technical terroir may well send positive signals for wines from New World countries.

Originality/value

This study is the first to empirically demonstrate that two different aspects of place influence a wine’s perceived authenticity.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Lan Xia and Kent B. Monroe

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Foo Nin Ho and Mark Patrick Gallagher

The purpose of this project was to explore and identify factors that influence a consumer to purchase wine during an afternoon of product sampling (wine tasting). A panel…

Abstract

The purpose of this project was to explore and identify factors that influence a consumer to purchase wine during an afternoon of product sampling (wine tasting). A panel of consumers was recruited for an afternoon of wine tasting at vineyards in Napa, California. Several potential hedonistic, utilitarian and logistical factors (i.e. winery facilities, quality of the wine and order in which the winery was visited) were measured using a journal log that was maintained by participants following the tasting experience for a period of one‐month. The conclusions drawn from this study were that group size, confidence in one's ability to purchase wine and overall assessment of a vineyard's wine portfolio were more important than the hedonistic factors in terms of inducing a sale immediately following a taste.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

257

Abstract

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Fuan Li, J.A.F. Nicholls, Nan Zhou, Tomislav Mandokovic and Guijun Zhuang

This paper compares the shopping behavior of Chilean consumers with those in China. Both Chinese and Chilean mall visits are driven, first and foremost, by purchase;…

Abstract

This paper compares the shopping behavior of Chilean consumers with those in China. Both Chinese and Chilean mall visits are driven, first and foremost, by purchase; however, consumers in Chile tend to be less single minded than their Chinese counterparts. Differences also exist between the two populations in their way of selecting the mall, shopping characteristics, and purchase patterns. Most importantly, Chinese shoppers relied more on their mall visits than Chileans in searching for information and finalizing their purchase decisions; at the same time, they were much more cautious in committing themselves to a purchase.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 15 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-728-5

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2007

Ulrich R. Orth

266

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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